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Adele Women Association in Nkwanta 'Upper Volta' Ghana

Adele Women Association in Nkwanta 'Upper Volta' Ghana Adele Women Association in Nkwanta 'Upper Volta' Ghana Our mission statement is an important guide for the direction of our campaign. kidsemailimage1.jpg FACT SHEET Purpose/Mission Statement Afrikan children are the children of once mighty nations whose job will be to help Afrikans “RISE” mightier then before. They are the recipients and the children of those who began “CIVILIZATION”. They too like all others have a legacy to uphold of those who gave the world its HUMANITY. This “gift” to the world inhabitants was to the detriment of the Afrikan continent in the main. Final mission is to take Afrikan children to Afrika on a regular basis to learn who they truly are as a people of greatness. Free their minds of contamination by not being born in Afrika. To be born in an uncontaminated Afrika FREE too from its historical wounds. More than four square miles of “LAND” was given to all “Captive Afrikan Survivor Refugees” (CASR) no matter where they were born on the planet Earth who were taken out of the Afrikan Continent by “BRUTE FORCE” and “UNTOLD TERROR”. This “UNGODLY ACT” AND “CRIME AGAINST HUMANITY” rendered “CAPTIVE AFRIKANS” (CA) “LANDLESS’ and “HOMELESS”; PARTICULARLY THOSE IN THE UNITED STATES!!! In January 2003, it was the “Old Man” as he was affectionately called, Torgbe Otamfu Aniewu Mensah who made this “Land Gift” possible by taking Dr. Olayemi Tinuoye to meet with his brother-in-law Nana Awuku Nsana II and the people of Dadaise Adele Traditional Area also known as Kratchi, Nkwanta, in the North Volta Region of Ghana, West Afrika. Negotiations took place with the representatives of the village according to traditional customs agreeing to give this parcel of “LAND” for ‘CAPTIVE AFRIKAN SURVIVOR REFUGEES’ repatriation to their natural homeland, Afrika. All the captors and scavengers of Afrika know who we are, the forced exiled children of AFRIKA. I, having known Dr. Olayemi Tinuoye (Yemi) for close to thirty years, more or less. We met as students at New York University (NYU) in the late 1970’s. He was a very young man in his late teens. Oftentimes we spoke on the return home to Afrika and that he must never consider staying here in the United States, on this I was very adamant along with several other CASR students. (Nzinga, Millie, …..) Yemi assured us that he would assist us in our return home to Afrika. The long held goal we had spoken of was finally coming to fruition. In August of 2003 when Yemi came to the US he brought the good news of what he had done for us. Samuel Burham of Florida was here at the time (one of the Ghana Nkwanta Project Group supporters). We were so elated of the good news it brought tears to my eyes. Later that year a letter was sent to me officially inviting me to Nkwanta to receive the “Land Gift”. In January of 2004, I went to Ghana for the preliminary receivership of the LAND. In April of 2004, the official LAND STAMPING of the land ceremonies were executed along with the enstoolment of I, Adunni Oshupa Tabasi thus becoming a Queen Mother of the village. It was due to my spiritual father, the ‘Old Man’ that I was made a Queen Mother. He told all in the family and in the village that I resembled his grandmother and that she had returned thereby, I became NuNu Afua FriFie II. (FriFie I was his grandmother). TORGBE OTAMFU ANIEWU MENSAH joined the African Ancestors: July 21st 2005 at the age of one hundred and twenty years old (120); He was the 12th child of his parents 14 children. This was his LEGACY to we the forced enslaved captive children of AFRIKA. We must never do anything to bring shame or dishonor to my spiritual father, “The Old Man”. Together, we the children of Afrika who were involuntarily removed from our “Homeland” from birth and many were yet unborn without our permission will return and once again reunite with our family members in Nkwanta and throughout the continent of Afrika. Returning home to Afrika was the GOAL of many, many, many of our enslaved Afrikan ancestors who did not opt to remain in permanent ‘BONDAGE’. Together we will work to build and develop the “LAND GIFT’ that was given for the betterment of all Afrikans. This LAND GIFT will be the INHERITANCE for all yet unborn Afrikan children to inherit. No longer will any Afrikan ever again in or outside of Afrika ever be LANDLESS AND HOMELESS ever again!!! nakwantawomanthumb.jpg “We can no longer wait for others. Waiting can be DEADLY, as we have seen in New Orleans and the Gulf States. If the Ghana Nkwanta Project had been in place those millions or more “Captive Afrikan Survivor Refugees” that were dispersed throughout the 50 states of the U.S. could have all been shipped straight to Ghana and families could have been intact and preserved.

Abia State University

Abia State University Abia State University Abia State University is one of the state owned universities in Nigeria. And best state university in nigeria These state academic institutions were created to expand admissions and bring professional skills, expertise and modern research facilities close to the city and rural dwellers; and have helped talented students to obtain Higher education. The inception of the university was in 1981 in the former Imo State under the name of Imo State University, Uturu, Okigwe. The university was established by Sam Mbakwe when he was Governor of old Imo State. Following the creation of Abia State in 1991, the Uturu campus of the University was ceded to Abia State; and is now known as Abia State University Uturu, Isuikwuato Local Government Area, Abia State, Nigeria. The university is organized in colleges and schools having been founded on the same collegiate system operated by University of Nebraska.

About Diaspocam: La Promo Du Commerce Et De La Culture Camerounaise

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Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University

Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University (ATBU), is a federal university of technology located in Bauchi, northern Nigeria. The university is named after the first Prime Minister of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa. The motto of the university is DOCTRINA MATER ARTIUM, which literally means "Education is the mother of the practical arts". The university is known for having one of the best Engineering programme in Nigeria. The Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University was established in 1980 as Federal University of Technology, Bauchi, Nigeria. The institution's first set of students were admitted in October 1981 for pre-degree and remedial programmes while the degree courses of the School of Science and Science Education began in October 1982. On 1 October 1984, the University was merged with Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria with a subsequent change of its name to Abubakar Tafawa Balewa College, Ahmadu Bello University, Bauchi Campus. The University regained its autonomous status in 1988 following a general demerger of such institutions. This was followed by a subsequent change of its name to Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi.

Access Gambia

Access Gambia Access Gambia Accessgambia.com is the Portal of Gambia related websites & information

ACP Observatory on Migration

ACP Observatory on Migration ACP Observatory on Migration Mission: IOM is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society. As the leading international organization for migration, IOM acts with its partners in the international community to: Assist in meeting the growing operational challenges of migration management. Advance understanding of migration issues. Encourage social and economic development through migration. Uphold the human dignity and well-being of migrants. IOM's Strategic Focus: To provide secure, reliable, flexible and cost-effective services for persons who require international migration assistance. To enhance the humane and orderly management of migration and the effective respect for the human rights of migrants in accordance with international law. To offer expert advice, research, technical cooperation and operational assistance to States, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders, in order to build national capacities and facilitate international, regional and bilateral cooperation on migration matters. To contribute to the economic and social development of States through research, dialogue, design and implementation of migration-related programmes aimed at maximizing migration's benefits. To support States, migrants and communities in addressing the challenges of irregular migration, including through research and analysis into root causes, sharing information and spreading best practices, as well as facilitating development-focused solutions. To be a primary reference point for migration information, research, best practices, data collection, compatibility and sharing. To promote, facilitate and support regional and global debate and dialogue on migration, including through the International Dialogue on Migration, so as to advance understanding of the opportunities and challenges it presents, the identification and development of effective policies for addressing those challenges and to identify comprehensive approaches and measures for advancing international cooperation. To assist States to facilitate the integration of migrants in their new environment and to engage diasporas, including as development partners. To participate in coordinated humanitarian responses in the context of inter-agency arrangements in this field and to provide migration services in other emergency or post-crisis situations as appropriate and as relates to the needs of individuals, thereby contributing to their protection. 1 To undertake programmes which facilitate the voluntary return and reintegration of refugees, displaced persons, migrants and other individuals in need of international migration services, in cooperation with other relevant international organizations as appropriate, and taking into account the needs and concerns of local communities. To assist States in the development and delivery of programmes, studies and technical expertise on combating migrant smuggling and trafficking in persons, in particular women and children, in a manner consistent with international law. To support the efforts of States in the area of labour migration, in particular short term movements, and other types of circular migration.

ACT Chinese Australian Association

ACT Chinese Australian Assoc ACT Chinese Australian Association A Chinese community organisation, to promote to Chinese culture and to promote the Chinese community networking. Orgainse monthly activities for members and friends and regular functions to celebrate the major Chinese festivals. Provide support for our senior community members.

Action Ministries Inc.

Action Ministries Inc. Action Ministries Inc. Action Ministries Inc. is a nonprofit that provides an extensive network of community partners and volunteers with the tools and expertise to lead fellow Georgians out of poverty. By meeting basic needs of hunger relief, housing and education, Action Ministries removes barriers that prevent thousands of Georgians from breaking the cycle of poverty and realizing their potential. Mission and Vision Action Ministries mobilizes communities to address the challenges of poverty by focusing on hunger relief, housing and education. We envision communities in which the cycle of poverty is broken and everyone has the tools needed to reach their full potential. At Action Ministries, we have a hands-on approach to caring for our community’s most vulnerable citizens. When we see neighbors in need, we take action … A child is hungry, and we provide a nutritious meal. A family is homeless, and we offer shelter and support. A veteran struggles to adjust to civilian life, and we reach out with a helping hand. A struggling individual seeks a brighter future, and we connect her with educational resources. We start with meeting these basic needs, and we end up transforming lives … With food in their stomachs, children can learn and grow. With a roof overhead, families can take the necessary steps toward stability. With support networks in place, veterans can share their strengths and talents with others. With the right education and life skills, people can become self-sufficient. Our vision is to break the cycle of poverty and ensure that everyone has the tools they need to reach their full potential. In recent years, we have become much more strategic in our pursuit of this goal, building a strong organizational infrastructure and focusing on best practices and key programs that can be replicated statewide. Under the direction of President and CEO John R. Moeller Jr., Action Ministries has become a leader in assisting people in need and mobilizing communities to tackle the challenges of poverty. Action Ministries has developed a dynamic and highly effective model that leverages volunteer hours, philanthropic support and in-kind contributions to achieve greater results through an extensive network of community partners and volunteers. We provide the tools and expertise to lead people out of poverty and work hand-in-hand with churches, Scout troops, community groups, local businesses and countless others. As a result, we have a reach far beyond many other nonprofit organizations. Every client served, every volunteer engaged, and every friend of the organization is an important part of the Action Ministries family. Together, we make a difference in the world by leading people out of poverty. Through Action Ministries Inc. sites located in Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Covington, Gainesville, Decatur, Rome, and programs such as Housing, Feed the Hungry and Smart Lunch, Smart Kid, we enable our partners to play a more vital role in their local communities. Action Ministries programs help our vulnerable neighbors in need lead more independent lives. Our volunteers come from varied backgrounds, including congregations, businesses and community organizations. This support helps make it possible for those in need to thrive in their newly transformed lives. Founded in 1963, Action Ministries is an independent, 501(c)(3) nonprofit registered as a charitable organization in the state of Georgia.

ActionAid Denmark / Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke

ActionAid Denmark, Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke ActionAid Denmark / Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke Action Aid Denmark fights poverty by promoting the political empowerment of the world?s poor. MS supports long-term development work, education programmes and campaigns as well as exchange of experience and knowledge between people. MS is part of ActionAid International.

Adamawa State University, Mubi

Adamawa State University, Mubi Adamawa State University, Mubi Adamawa State University, Mubi was established in January 2002 by the Adamawa State University law No. 10 of 2001. The University is located in Mubi town, in the Northern Senatorial District of Adamawa State, Nigeria. Mubi is geographically located within latitude 10.27 and longitude 13.28 and has an elevation of 1906 feet above sea level situated at the foot of the Mandara Mountains separating Nigeria from the Republic of Cameroun. It is characterised by a pleasant weather and beautiful scenic horizons. The town is the sect of the Emirate of Mubi with a First Class Emir.?

Addis Ababa University

Addis Ababa University Addis Ababa University The Mission of Addis Ababa University is to produce competent graduates, provide need based community service and produce problem-solving research outputs through innovative and creative education, research and consultancy service to foster social and economic development of the country.

Adekunle Ajasin University

Adekunle Ajasin University Adekunle Ajasin University The Ondo State University, now Adekunle Ajasin University was established as a state-owned university in December 1999 by the governor of Ondo State in Western Nigeria, Chief Adebayo Adefarati. It is named after Michael Adekunle Ajasin, the former Ondo State governor and educator who signed the law establishing the Ondo State University in 1982. It is located in Akungba Akoko, a small town near Ikare-Akoko.

Adelaide Kannada Sangha

Adelaide Kannada Sangha Adelaide Kannada Sangha The Adelaide Kannada Sangha (AKS) is a not for profit?organisation which promotes the cultural diversity provided by the people of?Karnataka?and?Kannada?speaking backgrounds. Through artistic programs involving dance, music and folklore, the Kannada community of Adelaide has been spreading the beauty of the Kannada language for more than 17 years and hopes to continue doing so in the future.

Adelaide Marathi Mandal in South Australia

Adelaide Marathi Mandal in South Australia Adelaide Marathi Mandal in South Australia Adelaide Marathi Mandal represents and upholds Marathi culture in Australia through different traditional and innovative programs. It belongs to all individuals who have an affinity for Marathi culture, food, Language, arts, Literature, history and music. For all people in South Australia and Adelaide who share this common bond, AMM endeavours to provide a platform for them to meet, socialise, and celebrate festivals and events while sharing the joyous spirit of Maharashtra. AMM is a non-profit organisation with a mission to: Promote, preserve, and cherish Marathi culture by promoting local talent in Adelaide and bringing quality programs from India in arts/education/religion/history and literature. Pass on the Marathi cultural heritage to the next generation covering all the aspects. Be a ?home away from home? for the new migrants and help them assimilate into Australia by promoting a sense of belonging.

Adelaide Metropolitan Malayalee Association (AMMA)

Adelaide Metropolitan Malayalee Association, AMMA Adelaide Metropolitan Malayalee Association (AMMA) Adelaide & Metropolitan Malayalee Association, popularly known as ?AMMA? is a non-profit community and cultural organisation, established by ?Malayalees? or people talk the language ?Malayalam? from the state of Kerala in the Indian sub-continent. It is a voluntary organization committed to the growth and togetherness of it?s members and provides assistance to new immigrants. AMMA community has been very active in promoting and preserving the arts and culture from their state of origin as well as appreciates the arts and respects the culture of others in the society. AMMA community also shares their cultural heritage by organizing joint programs in collaboration with other Indian and non-Indian community organisations in Australia. Besides, arts and culture our community is enthusiastically engaged in various indoor and outdoor sports and games as well, in order to retain it as a vibrant immigrant community. AMMA community members are proud to say that we belong to a caring, collaborative and culturally rich community in Adelaide originated from ?incredible India?, a land of great cultural diversity.

Adelaide Tamil Association in South Australia

Adelaide Tamil Association in South Australia Adelaide Tamil Association in South Australia Adelaide Tamil Association (ATA) is a non-profit, cultural organization serving the Adelaide Tamil community and will strive to maintain tamil culture, educational and community activities. Membership of the Adelaide Tamil Association is open to South Australians who have a keen interest and desire to foster the Tamil Culture, language and social interaction with other Tamils here in South Australia. ATA values the contributions of its members and volunteers, who continue to enrich this Tamil community and preserve its tradition in Adelaide.

Advance

Advance Advance Advance is a community of global Australians who are able to make a difference for Australians, Australian companies and Australia around the globe. We are devoted to the exchange of knowledge, connections and ideas to: Inspire and empower other global Australians to succeed in the world Build entrepreneurial Australian companies globally Grow global career opportunities for global Australians Create opportunities to be a ‘brain resource’ for Australia. A virtual meeting place of Australia’s most dynamic dreamers and achievers, Advance turns the collective goodwill and experience of our members into a vibrant resource of ideas, advice, inspiration and opportunities. Our ultimate aim is to create a global community of Australians, alumni of Australian universities and 'friends of Australia' that benefits: Australian companies with global growth aspirations Young Australians who want to make their mark Established leaders who want to give back to the next generation of Australian talent Global Australians that want to be a ‘brain resource’ to Australia through their knowledge, connections and expertise Join the fastest growing community of global Australians, an online and live community that sets the stage for people to forge friendships, share knowledge, share experience, spawn new business ideas, discuss global issues and support, challenge and influence.

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA ADVANCE AUSTRALIA Advance is a community of global Australians who are able to make a difference for Australians, Australian companies and Australia around the globe. We are devoted to the exchange of knowledge, connections and ideas to: Inspire and empower other global Australians to succeed in the world Build entrepreneurial Australian companies globally Grow global career opportunities for global Australians Create opportunities to be a ‘brain resource’ for Australia. A virtual meeting place of Australia’s most dynamic dreamers and achievers, Advance turns the collective goodwill and experience of our members into a vibrant resource of ideas, advice, inspiration and opportunities. Our ultimate aim is to create a global community of Australians, alumni of Australian universities and 'friends of Australia' that benefits: Australian companies with global growth aspirations Young Australians who want to make their mark Established leaders who want to give back to the next generation of Australian talent Global Australians that want to be a ‘brain resource’ to Australia through their knowledge, connections and expertise Join the fastest growing community of global Australians, an online and live community that sets the stage for people to forge friendships, share knowledge, share experience, spawn new business ideas, discuss global issues and support, challenge and influence. Advance is a community of global Australians who are able to make a difference for Australians, Australian companies and Australia around the globe. We are devoted to the exchange of knowledge, connections and ideas to: Inspire and empower other global Australians to succeed in the world Build entrepreneurial Australian companies globally Grow global career opportunities for global Australians Create opportunities to be a ‘brain resource’ for Australia. A virtual meeting place of Australia’s most dynamic dreamers and achievers, Advance turns the collective goodwill and experience of our members into a vibrant resource of ideas, advice, inspiration and opportunities. Our ultimate aim is to create a global community of Australians, alumni of Australian universities and 'friends of Australia' that benefits: Australian companies with global growth aspirations Young Australians who want to make their mark Established leaders who want to give back to the next generation of Australian talent Global Australians that want to be a ‘brain resource’ to Australia through their knowledge, connections and expertise Join the fastest growing community of global Australians, an online and live community that sets the stage for people to forge friendships, share knowledge, share experience, spawn new business ideas, discuss global issues and support, challenge and influence.

AFAC

AFAC AFAC Esta Asociación es iniciativa de varias familias que hemos adoptado en China. AFAC nace en 1996 de la mano de varias familias que querían adoptar en China y actualmente cuenta con unas 800 familias asociadas de toda España (Enero 2015). La intención en aquel momento fue exclusivamente facilitar información y soporte a todas aquellas personas que a través de la adopción en China, estaban dispuestas a dar una familia, un hogar, un futuro de normalidad a unas niñas y niños que sobrevivían en orfanatos Así pues, la asociación nace de la necesidad en que se encontraron las familias adoptantes en China de conseguir por si mismas lo que las administraciones no siempre eran capaces de ofrecer: Información actualizada, soporte, ánimo y sonrisas. En Enero de 2.011 fuimos Declarados Utilidad Pública, y en estos momentos en el que la adopción está sufriendo un fuerte descenso, la Asociación, sin olvidar su intención inicial, se ha convertido en una O.N.G. orientada en su totalidad a la colaboración y cooperación en China. Nuestra máxima satisfacción es poder ayudar en los orfanatos en los que la mayoría de niños sufren necesidades especiales, y que muchas veces, sin nuestra ayuda, serían únicamente “niños invisibles”. Nuestros recursos materiales y financieros se basan principalmente en las cuotas de los socios, las aportaciones de empresas y particulares y los ingresos que se obtienen de la venta di libros en nuestra tienda on-line , con lo que realizamos importantes proyectos destinados a mejorar la calidad de vida de los niños en los orfanatos chinos. Buscamos todo tipo de financiación, pero es imprescindible una asociación fuerte y con muchos socios para abrir las puertas necesarias. No podemos hacer otra cosa que animaros a colaborar con AFAC. AFAC es una Asociación inscrita en el Registro de Asociaciones 21106 sec. 1a. con el número G61789897

Afenmai Association of Georgia (AWC)

Afenmai Association of Georgia, AWC Afenmai Association of Georgia (AWC) Afenmai Association of Georgia ("AWC") was incorporated in May of 2006 as a State of Texas' non-profit corporation to serve as an umbrella organization of all Afenmai affiliated associations, unions or organizations throughout North America and beyond.

Afghani Embassy in Washington D.C., United States

Afghani Embassy in Washington D.C., United States Afghani Embassy in Washington D.C., United States Afghani Embassy in Washington D.C., United States

AFI/Universite de l'Entreprise en abrege

AFI, Universite de l'Entreprise, AFI/l'UE AFI/Universite de l'Entreprise en abrege AFI, Universite de l'Entreprise, AFI/l'UE is ...

Afri Diaspora

Afri Diaspora Afri Diaspora Nana-Ama Kyerematen is the Founder and Managing Editor of Afridiaspora.com, a webzine dedicated to showcasing and promoting Literature from Africa and the diaspora. As the founder and curator of the premiere African Literature Festival in the United States, she seeks to provide a platform for aspiring and established great African writers, be them at home in Africa or the diaspora. Born in Accra, Ghana, she has an MBA in Financial Management and has worked in the Alternative Investment space at various Investment Banks and transnational financial firms for over a decade. She currently works in Investor Relations for a large multistrategy hedge fund in New York. Ayobami Adebayo writes fiction and creative non-fiction. She is an editor at Saraba Literary Magazine. Tolu Daniel is a short story writer and has been published on Naija Stories, African Stories and the Muwado David Asumda is a Lawyer and the Dean of Law at Zenith University College, Accra, Ghana. Elizabeth Akua-Nyarko Patterson is the Founder and Executive Director of the Girls Education Initiative of Ghana.

Afri-Impact

Afri-Impact Afri-Impact Background Health systems across Africa remain weak, in spite of the vast sums of money spent on health system development and health care delivery by international aid organisations and governments. Some of the reasons for this include a lack of coordinated working by the different stakeholders in the health sector, as well as support that often does not align with the health care priorities of African countries. Also priority health research into local health needs is insufficient. Consequently health programming on the continent is most often not evidence-based, resulting in ineffective and inefficient health interventions and poor health care delivery. Health worker migration has also proven to be a significant contributor to keeping Africa's health systems inherently weak. What is Afri-Impact? Afri-impact is a project that aims to impact on health improvements on the African continent by profiling a wide range of health projects, opinions and ideas in a manner that positively contributes to health system development and health care delivery. It has as part of its remit, to positively impact on evidence-based health improvements on the continent by achieving exposure for health projects regardless of size, and promoting the sharing of information. It utilizes its platform including its presence on social media to proffer not only perspective, but also generate discussion about global health issues especially as it affects Africa and Africans. What is Afri-Impact's mission? The mission of Afri-Impact is to organise and profile knowledge and experience in a manner that serves as a catalyst for improvements to health systems across Africa. To fulfil its mission, Afri-Impact pursues the following strategic objectives: To establish and maintain a means of profiling the work of health personnel and organisations involved in sustainable health systems development and health care delivery on the continent. To profile the work of Diaspora health institutions actively engaged in partnership working with health institutions on the continent To establish a channel of communication and experience sharing between health personnel and organisations working on similar health projects on the continent, thus ensuring the sharing of lessons learned as well as best practices. To facilitate a process of matching specific public health skill sets within Africa and the Diaspora to institutions and projects in Africa with specific health care development and delivery needs. To facilitate a process of stakeholder peer support. Authors Enyi Anosike Enyi Anosike Enyi Anosike is a medical doctor with training and experience in the fields of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. He is creator of the Afri-Impact project, an idea conceived on the back of his experiences training and working as a medical doctor in Africa, with an interest not just in clinical care, but also in contributing to developing systems of health care delivery sensitive to the population dynamics as well as aspirations of African countries. Enyi's extensive tutoring and interactions with colleagues and experts in the fields of health services quality management and health systems development have also played an important part in shaping the thrust of Afri-Impact. Enyi currently serves as a Trustee and Chair of training unit of AmaudoUK, a U.K based charity actively involved in mental health services development in Nigeria, West Africa. He is also a Trustee of the Public Health Foundation of Nigeria. Oke Anosike Oke Anosike Oke Anosike is a project developer, process Engineer and blogger, and he currently holds the position of senior process engineer within the pharmaceutical industry. He is a co-creator of Afri-impact, and serves as project manager of the project. Oke who is Nigerian, is one of a wave of young Africans that are utilizing the power of networking and web-enabled openness to help move the continent forward. Oke sees connecting, profiling and sharing experiences as a means of breaking the cycle of poverty, under- development and exploitation that currently bedevils Africa, and this has motivated his involvement in the Afri-Impact project. Oke's blog 'anosikeeng' utilizes a simplified approach to answering process and project engineering questions which often bother graduate Engineers. In his day job, Oke's significant contribution to the energy industry has led to the rapid growth of environmentally friendly evaporative cooling units that serve U.K's manufacturing sector. The Afri Impact team The Afri Impact team The Afri Impact team includes contributors to the 'Perspectives' and 'projects' section of the website

AFRIBIZ FOUNDATION

AFRIBIZ FOUNDATION AFRIBIZ FOUNDATION To bring together people, organizations, and resources inside and outside Africa to create, nurture and grow a sustainable continental ecosystem, which is inclusive of those who live on and outside the African continent economically and socially, interdependent and fully engaged with the global economy, and promotes freedom and growth. This is accomplished through implementing economic ecosystems that are linked together, working synergistically and synchronously across the globe, and place people as the foci.

Africa 2.0

Africa 2.0, AFRICA 2.0 FOUNDATION Africa 2.0 Our vision is to be a significant catalyst of accelerated and sustainable growth on the African continent, building an inspiring and prosperous Africa. Africa 2.0 is more than a network – all of our 600+ members, from across Africa and the Diaspora, are visionary leaders in their own right and together they make up an unstoppable community dedicated to the transformation of Africa. Founded in 2010 by Mamadou Toure, Africa 2.0 provides a platform and unifying vision for these emerging and established African leaders to leapfrog the development of Africa with sustainable solutions. We are often described as a D-ink Tank - a think tank that Does things - because, we focus on these main areas: IMPACT INITIATIVES: We run a variety of programmes that drive progress under our 10 strategic pillars, with a particular focus on youth empowerment through entrepreneurship. Our flagship initiative is Start Up Africa, a year round initiative that is kicked off with a high profile pitching event for businesses that solve Africa’s biggest problems. It provides entrepreneurs with access to capital, the network and media exposure, business incubation, investor-ready toolkits and mentorship to make their businesses a success. ADVOCACY & CAMPAIGNS: We lead the way in building a unified voice for Africans everywhere through our WeAre1ne movement and showcase the best of Africa through our #FABA For Africa By Africa campaign. We also mobilise communities around our strategic pillars. For example our ZeroEbola campaign (led by our Healthcare taskforce) that set out a communication and engagement framework for affected communities to mobilise around in a synchronised way. This activity is underpinned by ongoing COMMUNITY BUILDING: our Annual Leadership Symposium and other events, Chapter activities, partnerships and online engagement through social media and newsletters.

Africa Agribusiness

Africa Agribusiness Africa Agribusiness Africa Agribusiness started in 2011 but our experts have roots stretching back decades, allowing us to blend the energy of a startup with the experience of a more seasoned organization. Our Magazine exists in order to connect Africa’s agricultural sector to the rest of the world. By doing so, we hope to act as a catalyst to the development of Africa’s agricultural sector. We will inform and connect African farmers, business persons, and governments with modern technologies, practices, ideas, and materials (increase Africa’s human capital). We hope that this will help African nations develop independent and vibrant agricultural sectors which will lead to decreases in malnutrition and general increases in health and well being for the continent. Furthermore, we hope to help connect Westerners to Africa so that they can gain a greater understanding of African culture and agribusiness opportunities which exist in Africa (increase direct and indirect foreign investment in Africa). While we also want to promote trade between African nations. This approach should help lead to sustainable agricultural development and could lead to growth in other sectors of the economy via linkages. In order to accomplish these goals AAM publishes a bi-monthly magazine which is distributed in the United States, African nations, and published on the internet. Our magazine focuses upon engaging the outside world with Africa, getting vital information on farming techniques, identifying comparative advantages, helping our readers learn how to invest in the agricultural sectors of certain countries, connecting non-profits, help farmers learn how to access modern farming equipment, and supporting community efforts for development. We have scholarly articles along with more personal articles, so as to balance the content of the magazine and make it more acces-sible to a larger audience. If your organization, business, or you as an individual are interested in working with us, please go to our website at: www.africaag.org or contact us at info@africaag.org. We offer affordable, quality advertisements and can assist in translating, graphic design, and internet promotions. Furthermore, if you are a writer, journalist, professional, or someone with an opinion or information who would like to be published send us an article and we will review your article for publication. If you are interested in becoming a licensed distributor or advertisement salesperson, of AAM please feel free to contact us.

AFRICA AMERICA HIGHER EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS

AFRICA AMERICA HIGHER EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS, AAHEP AFRICA AMERICA HIGHER EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS AAHEP assists in training/qualifying African women of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics for PhD degrees in US universities. They return to Africa to teach and lead, bringing to Africa a new intellectual and academic culture that will help elevate battered African universities. AAHEP was formed in 2007, and believes that women are half the sky and hold in their grasp Africa's fate. AAHEP is a Diaspora group that epitomizes the best of the Diaspora - giving back to Africa that which can not be corrupted (education) and that which will last for many generations to come. At a time when the world is defending itself from bigotry and terrorism, AAHEP's women's education is the best, most inexpensive antidote possible. STEM PhDs are superior to all else America can give to Africa.

Africa and the African Diaspora

Africa and the African Diaspora Africa and the African Diaspora Reference website about Africa and the African Diaspora

Africa and the Diaspora Timeline

Africa and the Diaspora Timeline Africa and the Diaspora Timeline Africa and the Diaspora Timeline

Africa Australia Infrastructure Conference

Africa Australia Infrastructure Conference Africa Australia Infrastructure Conference Africa Australia Infrastructure Conference ? Africa Australia Infrastructure Conference (AAIC) is a business enabling international forum that is focused on building business relationships between African and Australian Infrastructure stakeholders. AAIC is a one-stop international conference designed to present every delegate with a great opportunity to meet and interact with African and Australian infrastructure decision-makers drawn from key sectors.

Africa Book Centre

Africa Book Centre Africa Book Centre The Africa Book Centre Limited was founded on 1 April 1989 to provide books and music from and about the continent of Africa. We ship to most countries in the world (see our terms and conditions).?

Africa Business Club of Columbia

Africa Business Club of Columbia Africa Business Club of Columbia The Africa Business Club of Columbia Business School is dedicated to increasing awareness of business opportunities on the African continent within the Columbia Business School community. Our activities are professional, educational and social in nature, and are open to all members and alumni of Columbia Business School.

Africa Business Roundtable

Africa Business Roundtable Africa Business Roundtable In 1988, a group of 25 prominent business leaders convened at the Headquarters of the African Development Bank in Abidjan, to advise the then Bank President on strategies to enhance the role of private enterprises in African development. As a result, a Private Sector Development Unit was set up in the Bank for direct ADB financing of African private enterprise. After a span of two years, this informal grouping of business leaders saw the wisdom of mobilizing the African private sector into a coherent body capable of re-engineering the continental role of private enterprise as the engine of growth for Africa. Thus in March 1990, at a historic meeting in Cairo, the African Business Roundtable (ABR) was born.

Africa Business Roundtable (ABR)

Africa Business Roundtable, ABR Africa Business Roundtable (ABR) Africa Business Roundtable (ABR) believes Africa's private sector is the commercial engine for the continent's overall economy. ABR seeks to emphasize the economic partnerships, which unites the Public Sector, Developmental Partners and the Private Sector for economic rejuvenation. ABR Members are drawn from all the regions of Africa, from Cairo to Cape Town. For more information visit : www.abrnet.org The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) is a VISION and STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK FOR AFRICA?s RENEWAL. The NEPAD strategic framework document arises from a mandate given to the five initiating Heads of State (Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa) by the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) to develop an integrated socio-economic development framework for Africa. The 37th Summit of the OAU in July 2001 formally adopted the strategic framework document. NEPAD is designed to address the current challenges facing the African continent. Issues such as the escalating poverty levels, underdevelopment and the continued marginalisation of Africa needed a new radical intervention, spearheaded by African leaders, to develop a new Vision that would guarantee Africa's Renewal. For more information visit : www.nepad.org AfricaRecruit is an organisation that facilitates and enables capacity building in Africa using the Diaspora as one of the engines of investment. AfricaRecruit strongly believes, acknowledges from experience and observation that the Diaspora for one reason or another, are a very valuable resource and powerful force or tool for rebuilding their country. This engagement can be for the Diaspora to channel their resources to ventures in their country through secondary or tertiary avenues, while they remain in the Diaspora. For more information visit : www.africarecruit.com BEN Television is the first multi-cultural, urban and cosmopolitan channel operating from United Kingdom (SKY EPG number 184). BEN Television is a ?free- to-air channel and can be received on the Sky Television network. BEN Television is the largest provider of wholesome infotainment content, targeting a black and ethnic audience across Europe; its appeal reaches across the cross-cultural audience from a younger generation, through to the more mature, professional and affluent consumer. BEN Television's satellite footprint covers UK, Europe and parts of North Africa and reaches more than 7 million homes on the Sky satellite network. BEN Television's potential audience is 30 million digital satellite homes. For more information visit : www.bentelevision.com

Africa Center

Africa Center, Museum for African Art Africa Center The Africa Center, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, multidisciplinary institution, provides a gateway for engagement with contemporary Africa. The Center’s work is premised on the idea that this emerging market of one billion people, characterized by extraordinary diversity and complexity, is inescapably relevant to building a prosperous, secure, and desirable future. Minutes from the United Nations and located at One Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue adjoining Harlem in New York City, The Africa Center will operate locally and globally to transform our understanding of the world’s oldest continent, which also boasts its youngest population. Encompassing culture, policy, and business, The Africa Center promotes partnership, collaboration, dialogue and understanding between African artists, business leaders and civil society and their counterparts in the United States and beyond. The Africa Center will host visual, performing, and digital arts presentations; develop and disseminate innovative educational tools; convene focused, thoughtful peer-to-peer exchanges; and sponsor results-oriented policy research. In its first three years of being fully operational, the Center will focus primarily on three themes that resonate particularly powerfully in New York City: urbanization, managing diversity, and empowering and engaging young people. This fertile starting ground recognizes the fact that Africa is the most rapidly urbanizing continent on the planet; home to extraordinary religious, cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and environmental diversity; and demographically is the youngest region in the world. These themes will inform our work across our three major lines of activity. Program Culture: Building on its history as the Museum for African Art, the Center will be a home for exhibitions, performances and showings of visual, performing, and digital art from Africa. It will allow the continent to speak for itself. But it will be more than a venue – we aim to foster new collaborations and dialogues between African artists and those in the United States, and the African diaspora. Policy: The Center will focus its efforts on linking research capacity with change agents on the ground in Africa, building transcontinental teams to find policy solutions. We will also work to build a broader constituency for good policy through educational initiatives that aim to bring basic “Africa literacy” to a wide range of audiences. Business: The Center will help the private sector to navigate 53 distinct business climates, will make hard-to-obtain data available and understandable, and will facilitate peer-to-peer introductions. We will help potential partners find each other, and share best practices from the continent. The Center will also play a role in institutionalizing the content and value of the Business Forum that accompanied the U.S.-Africa Summit in August 2014. The Center seeks a constant dialogue among these lines of effort to build a more holistic understanding of contemporary Africa and maximize the potential for inspiration and innovative new partnerships. Culture influences policy; it’s often the vanguard of social and political change. Policy enables or inhibits business. We will bring these elements together to grow the relationship between Africa, the United States, and the rest of the world. Why Africa today? “Africa is the new frontier for business. With unprecedented growth in the natural resources sector and the services industry, at last Africa is turning a corner. What underpins the growth story is the improvement in governance, transparency, gender and human rights over the last decade. By 2035, Africa’s labour force will be larger than China. 15 of the 20 fastest growing cities in the world between 2015 and 2020 will be African. Today, Africa’s top trading partner is the EU followed closely by China. The US is a very distant third. That was not the case some years ago. The US needs to reconnect with Africa. That is why the Africa Center is relevant.” Mo Ibrahim, Entrepreneur and Philanthropist Why is a building necessary? “New York’s Africa Center commands a powerful international presence, which will draw upon the rich cultural, social and political legacy and history of the diaspora together with the inimitable cultural beat of New York, itself. This pairing is immediately captivating and will resonate with the contemporary African community and beyond. New York is a global city, which has welcomed the diaspora – and the Center is a fantastic platform from which to deliver this message to the world.” David Adjaye, Architect Why New York? “This is the African century. There’s a sort of static electricity around Africa at the moment that is exciting. I think, in a way, New York would be less relevant without a piece of that. New York has always been the global crossroads and now for the first time there is a clear sign post saying ‘Africa this way’ . . . fun, educational, imaginative. The Africa Center is great for the continent but it’s even greater for New York.” Bono, Musician, Activist and Philanthropist Why is a center the answer? “Africa’s role in global affairs is expanding and deepening. New York is a great city where much of the world’s politics and business is conducted. Africa needs a strong and vibrant presence in the city. . . the Africa Center, through dialogue and debate, will promote public understanding of African issues and present African perspectives on questions of world significance. The Africa Center, which reflects the ambition and vitality of a continent on the rise, will add a new and innovative dimension to New York’s long engagement with Africa.”

Africa Center for Strategic Studies

Africa Center for Strategic Studies Africa Center for Strategic Studies Vision Security for all Africans championed by effective institutions accountable to their citizens. Mission To advance African security by expanding understanding, providing a trusted platform for dialogue, building enduring partnerships, and catalyzing strategic solutions. History Following bipartisan discussions with U.S. European Command (EUCOM), the House National Security Committee in June 1995 requested that the Department of Defense develop an “African Center for Security Studies” that would “encourage a broader understanding on the African continent of military matters compatible with democratic principles and civilian control.” In March 1998, President Bill Clinton made the first major trip to sub-Saharan Africa by a U.S. president in over 20 years. While there, he discussed promoting a U.S.-Africa partnership for the 21st century based on mutual respect and mutual interest, and announced the intention to establish a regional Africa center “designed in consultation with African nations and intended to promote the exchange of ideas and information tailored specifically for African concerns,” according to a White House fact sheet from April 1998. In March 1999, the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) was formally established in Arlington, Virginia, with Dr. Nancy J. Walker as the Center’s first director. The Africa Center’s first event was its Senior Leaders Seminar, held in Dakar, Senegal, in May 1999. The Dakar seminar brought together 115 senior-level civilians, flag-level military officers, and representatives of civil society from Africa, Europe and the United States for two weeks of intense academic work. Fifty African nations were represented. In 2004, the Africa Center was co-located with the National Defense University, with ACSS situated in a group of historic pre–Civil War buildings in the heart of Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, D.C. ACSS is dedicated to promoting good governance and democratic values in the defense and security sectors around the globe, and to establishing long-term active communications with African leaders across the continent, as well as deepening the discussion and debate on African security issues in order to see a more peaceful and prosperous continent. The Africa Center accomplishes this through a comprehensive program of seminars, symposia, conferences, research, and other academic programs, as well as through a range of outreach activities and programs in Africa, Europe, and the United States.

Africa Confidential

Africa Confidential Africa Confidential Africa Confidential is one of the longest-established specialist publications on Africa, with a considerable reputation for being first with in-depth news and analysis on significant political, economic and security developments across the continent. Our track record owes much to our comprehensive network of local correspondents, and the connections we’ve built up throughout Africa since we started publishing back in 1960. Why 'confidential'? This continent-wide, on-the-ground coverage enables us to identify and monitor upcoming issues long before they are picked up by the general media – and analyse their real significance for our readers. What’s more, all our contributors write for us on the basis of strict anonymity, a principle that was established from the outset in 1960 to ensure writers’ personal safety in the turbulent, early years of post-colonial African independence. Hence the newsletter’s title. Who reads Africa Confidential? Today, Africa Confidential is read fortnightly by a wide range of institutions and individuals around the world, all of them united in their need for timely, accurate and incisive analysis of contemporary African developments. Our subscribers include: agencies of national governments - including defense, national intelligence, foreign affairs and the diplomatic corps risk advisory firms working in areas as varied as political, market & reputational risk, due diligence, anti-corruption (FCPA and UK Anti-Bribery Act) and KYC (Know Your Customer) multilateral institutions - including the IMF/World Bank, European Union and African Union universities and other academic institutions, in their departments of African Affairs, International Relations, International Development, and others a wide range of international NGOs and think tanks working in the areas of humanitarian affairs, relief aid, anti-corruption/good governance and economic development multinational corporations and companies across a wide variety of commercial sectors, from mining, energy and telecommunications, to financial markets and automotive To preserve our readers’ information advantage, Africa Confidential is only available by subscription. You’ll not find it on high street newsstands or other public outlets. Moreover, none of our commentary, news and analysis is syndicated to the international news services, re-sold to any of the web-based information aggregators like Reuters or LexisNexis, or aggregated on free sites like Google News. So when you subscribe to Africa Confidential, you can be sure of receiving original, timely reporting and insightful analysis - actionable intelligence not available from any other media source. That’s why, more than 50 years after its founding, Africa Confidential remains at the forefront of reporting on the continent’s key political, economic and security developments.

Africa Confidential

Africa Confidential Africa Confidential With almost 40 years' experience of analysing political and economic developments,?Africa Confidential?has an unrivalled track record in forecasting both general trends and specific events in Africa.

Africa Destiny

Africa Destiny, African diaspora Africa Destiny We are a collective of Africans from around the world whose primary focus has been on Pan African trade and economic development. The future belongs to those who best invest their resources toward their own visions of sustainable development. For many Africans raised throughout the Diaspora of the West, The Sun is Rising in the East. For people of African lineage around the world this sunrise ushers in an era of potential economic empowerment to rival or exceed any such period affecting the destiny of a civilization in world history. With the pace of communications, technological innovation and economic development moving at the fastest rate ever, we now have the potential to develop access to natural resources, engineering skills, human capital and strategic planning at unprecedented scale. There are over a billion African people scattered all over the planet and our continental homeland contains the greatest untapped natural resources of the whole planet. This is a time of great excitement over what this combination of elements means for our global vision of empowerment. We have seen some of our willing trade partners, such as China, Brazil, India, Korea and others move from under the heels of colonial domination to the front line of economic and industrial competitiveness against their former imperialist masters. These nations have now become masters of their own human potential, development resources and political capital. They are investing this capacity in massive quantity toward a future which they deem critical for their survival. Now it is our turn as one billion Africans to look inward toward our own immense resourcefulness and to initiate a volcanic eruption of our own self-determination.

Africa Diaspora Awards (ADA)

Africa Diaspora Awards, ADA Africa Diaspora Awards (ADA) 1 - Background: The Africa Diaspora Awards (ADA) ceremony is an event which celebrates, honours and recognises achievement from within the African Diaspora community.The Awards will be one of the most significant events within the African and broader diaspora community; it is anticipated that it will become a major annual event. A pioneering, unique and prestigious event, the African Diaspora Awards is an event which pays tribute to African success across all walks of life; emphasising achievement and highlighting inspirational role models in the fields of business, sport, entertainment, philanthropy and popular arts and culture. These awards celebrate diversity and multiculturalism and the achievements of the contemporary and historical African diaspora community in the UK. The African diaspora in the UK has, over the past decade, achieved greater recognition for their positive contrbution to Africa's development as well as to that of the United Kingdom. This is a momentous time for the wider African diaspora, and for Africa; in recognition of the achievements and sacrifices on which any success is based , the Awards provide a unique and prestigious celebration of the African Diaporans who have followed their dreams and overcome hardship to achieve success. 2 - Vision: ? Highlight the positive contributions the African diaspora community makes to the UK and to Africa. ? Recognise and reward the contributions of migrants to the UK Community. ? Recognise the achievements of multiculturalism and help to promote new thinking on multiculturalism. ? Highlight and recognise the partnerships and achievements between the African diaspora and Africa. ? Highlight the entrepreneurial spirit and resilience of the African diaspora and multicultural communities in the UK.

AFRICA DIASPORA FOR TRADE ENTERPRISE AND DEVELOPMENT

AFRICA DIASPORA FOR TRADE ENTERPRISE AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA DIASPORA FOR TRADE ENTERPRISE AND DEVELOPMENT Create a strong formal network of Africans in diaspora in Ireland and around the world in the interest of supporting Africa-centered enterprises. Share ideas, resources, funding and expertise from Africans in the diaspora into Africa. Initiate diaspora sustainable economic developments across Africa including business start-up, information banks, funding, business incubators, institutes of technology, training networks, centres of excellence, support offices, etc. Encourage the export of high value goods and services to Africa, partnerships and collaborations with African companies. Enhance Africa's economic growth strategic mission in Africa by utilising the knowledge and deep-rooted connections of indigenous Africans living abroad Link with other African diaspora movements around the world. INDUSTRY: Education, Entrepreneurship, Economic Growth and Development, Investment/Trade ACTIVITIES: Consulting/Training, Research/Development, Events, Communications, Fundraising, Volunteering/Mentoring, Investment/Business Development, Technical Assistance/Capacity Development

Africa Diaspora in UK

Africa Diaspora in UK Africa Diaspora in UK Harnessing the human and financial capital from the Diaspora to Agricultural growth in Africa. Africa Diaspora Investment forum 2006 will be to foster an ongoing dialogue between the Diaspora, Policy makers, trainers, skills developers and potential investors on the way forward and how best to productively channel the alternative finances and skills of the Diaspora to harness the agricultural sector in Africa. The conference is designed to showcase success stories in the Agriculture sector, its challenges and opportunities with recommendations on the steps that Diaspora can take to ensure that their human or financial capital counts towards the promotion of a sustainable Agriculture development in Africa.

AFRICA EUROPE DIASPORA DEVELOPMENT PLATFORM

AFRICA EUROPE DIASPORA DEVELOPMENT PLATFORM, ADEPT AFRICA EUROPE DIASPORA DEVELOPMENT PLATFORM ADEPT’s mission is to improve and enhance the capacity and impact of the African diaspora organisations that are involved in development activities in Africa. This aim is pursued through delivery of services to diaspora organisations and individuals both in Europe and Africa. In particular, ADEPT will help diaspora organisations in the EU, Norway and Switzerland to: • Optimise their development engagement in Africa • Professionalise their organisations and activities • Create effective partnerships between/in Europe and Africa • Expand and improve their development activities in Africa • Influence the policy and practice of development cooperation. INDUSTRY: Entrepreneurship, Human Rights/Democracy/Governance, Gender Equality/Women's Empowerment, Other, Economic Growth and Development ACTIVITIES: Advocacy, Research/Development, Events, Communications, Volunteering/Mentoring, Investment/Business Development, Policy Development, Program Implementation, Technical Assistance/Capacity Development ADEPT is a service delivery platform working with African Diaspora Development Organisations (ADDOs) in Europe that are active in the development of Africa. ADEPT will work and engage with 84 countries (28 EU countries, plus Switzerland and Norway, and 54 African countries). We serve as a point of reference for those interested in migration, diaspora and development in Africa. We work with: diaspora organisations and enterprises governments and policymakers development and international agencies civil society organisations and academia ADEPT is funded by the European Union and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation Background Information The creation of ADEPT is part of an ongoing process originally inspired by the decisions of African and EU leaders to formally involve African diaspora groups in development processes in Africa, as reflected in the Joint Africa-EU Strategic Partnership (Lisbon, December 2007; Declaration of the Ministerial Conference on Migration and Development (Tripoli, November 2006); and the Declaration of the Euro-African Ministerial Conference on Migration and Development (Rabat, July 2006). In 2008 and 2009, the Africa Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) organised two groundbreaking policy seminars, bringing together 50 leading diaspora organisations from 10 EU countries as well as policymakers from Africa and Europe. The June 2008 seminar in Brussels was on ‘Engaging African Diaspora in Europe as Strategic Agents for Development in Africa’. The October 2009 seminar in Brussels was on ‘Participation of the Diaspora in the Joint Africa-EU Strategic Partnership’. This second policy seminar was organised in collaboration with the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD), with support from the European Commission and the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. During the proceedings of the October 2009 policy seminar, the African Foundation for Development (AFFORD), which participated in both seminars, drafted a proposal for the setting up of a permanent platform for African diaspora-development organisations in Europe. This proposal outlined the main purpose and activities of an Africa-Europe Diaspora Development Platform. It also set out practical action points to be undertaken to make the proposal a reality. By means of a vote, the diaspora organisations accepted and adopted the proposal. As set out in the Action Points of the AFFORD proposal, a consortium was created and funding was provided for what became the 2011-2013 Africa-Europe Platform pilot project (The formal name was ‘Europe-wide African Diaspora Platform for Development [EADPD]). The five consortium partners of the pilot project were: the African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC), the African Foundation for Development (AFFORD), the Coordination Générale des Migrants pour le Développement (CGMD), the Forum des Organisations de Solidarité Internationale issues des Migrations (FORIM), and the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD). Funding was provided by the European Union with additional support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Germany’s Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ).

Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL)

Africa Fashion Week London, AFWL Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL) Created by Ronke Ademiluyi, Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL) is Europe's largest catwalk event of African and African-inspired design. A collaborative catwalk and exhibition, highlighting the industry’s established and emerged African designers, AFWL is at the forefront of capturing the surge of the African inspired trends in the fashion industry. Our annual event aims to celebrate the work of African and African inspired designers in the UK and worldwide. MISSION: To increase the visibility and awareness of our designers by providing them with an affordable global showcasing platform.

Africa Focus At Harvard

Africa Focus At Harvard Africa Focus At Harvard Certainly, Harvard University offers it all. When it comes to multidenominational and cross-cultural studies, they have a wealth of programs and initiatives.? African studies is one such example. Here, at AfricaFocusAtHarvard.com we explore the vast reservoir of offerings that Harvard has for those interested in Africa, African heritage, African languages and more.

Africa Foundation Stone (AFS)

Africa Foundation Stone, AFS Africa Foundation Stone (AFS) Africa Foundation Stone (AFS) is charity organisation providing a range of services to the local diverse communities. Since its creation (2000) Africa Foundation Stone has been able to create different projects for children, young people and adults in order to tackle underachievement, exclusion, unemployment and crime. In 2005 AFS in association with Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) has successfully launched and is running an international volunteering programme. AFS volunteer programme is innovative as volunteers predominantly are African or African Europeans who are acknowledged professionals within the fields of Participation & Governance, HIV & AIDS and Secure Livelihood. Mission: Africa Foundation Stone (AFS) aims to achieve lasting improvements in the quality of life of disadvantaged people in the communities both in the UK and abroad.It seeks to promote enviromental awareness, health and socail welfare.It also aims to relieve poverty and sickness through international volunteering.

Africa Gathering

Africa Gathering Africa Gathering Welcome to the Africa Gathering Movement and Thank you for supporting us. You too can join this movement to share ideas for positive change. What is Africa Gathering? Africa Gathering draws inspiration from the traditional, symbolic African Baobab tree: the place where people can gather to share knowledge, exchange ideas and learn from each other. Under AG’s tree all speaks openly, from activators to innovators, from artists to technologists. Under our tree we celebrate the change-makers and their work, we connect them to like-minded people, we share their passion for a positive Africa. Gathered under this tree, we bring African ideas and innovations to the rest of the world so that they can be recognised, used and celebrated. We provide an online and offline exchange forum that allows ordinary but amazingly talented African activators to champion their projects and concepts so that their achievements can be given exposure, gain momentum and attract interest from a global audience. What makes us different? We are passionate Africans looking to celebrate our continent’s human capital. We understand the needs of ordinary Africans. Africa is at the heart of everything we do. Under our Baobab tree, we bring together the new generation of social entrepreneurs, activators, investors and dream makers in one place so they can share their ideas, hopes and visions. Unlike other organisations we actively work to get results – rather than just muse about what we could do or pontificate about what we think should be done. We cross technical, social and ethnic divides by giving Africans a place to discuss their own ideas, rather than have someone speak on their behalf. We work with enthusiastic and capable Africans on the ground to help us run our events and collaborate with African initiatives locally to spread the word about the continent’s best innovations. Why should you come to our gatherings? We are targeting everyone who believes that technology can help bring positive change, from big businesses to one-man outfits, educators to entrepreneurs, people who understand Africa and those who want to understand Africa better. Who should come to Africa Gathering? We are an inclusive platform and welcome all sort of people from bottom to top. If you’re a business – to find out what other businesses are doing, to meet an engage with the business community If you’re an investor – to expose yourself to some of the most creative raw talent in the tech/Africa field If you’re an entrepreneur – to meet with other motivated people like you who are passionate about technology and positive social change If you’re an inventor/innovator – come and be inspired by other creative minds. Talk, learn and share. If you’re just interested – you’d be surprised at how much you can help by simply thinking about the ideas that are presented, making suggestions and feeling the atmosphere all helps. If you don’t come you’ll never know how you can fit in.

AFRICA IMPORTERS DIRECTORY

AFRICA IMPORTERS DIRECTORY AFRICA IMPORTERS DIRECTORY AFRICA IMPORTERS DIRECTORY Full Pack This Directory contains the latest and complete information about your potential business partners in several countries across Africa. - Database of listings of Top Companies in 34 African countries - In MS Excel format - Classified under different Trade Categories - Up-to-date database Over 637,000 listings from 34 African countries Most listings with E-mail addresses. Classified under different trade sectors. Also available for direct download in Excel spreadsheet format Instant direct download in Excel format This Directory is essentially produced for international exporters, importers, manufacturers, traders and merchants looking to establish contacts with their business counterparts and importers in Africa. This Directory is a must for export-oriented enterprises looking for business partners in the booming and lucrative markets of Africa.

Africa Inspired

Africa Inspired Africa Inspired Africa Inspired is a UK Charity organisation that offers a memorable and inspirational experience of volunteer work in Africa. The organisation has one common goal, to offer an opportunity to people who want to make a real difference by sharing their skills and expertise to empower African communities and Families to become self reliant. Mission: Africa Inspired's overall aim and vision is to help young Africans become entrepreneurs through mentorship programmes and personal development.The charity looks to enable Africans to expand their ability to reach their full potential and also seeks to open the minds of young Africans to look far beyond their dreams and beyond the traditional journeys to success

Africa Intelligence

Africa Intelligence Africa Intelligence The leading website for professional information on Africa, Africa Intelligence dissiminates confidential information on the African continent's political and economic news. Updated almost daily, its tremendous database houses the archives of all the articles appearing since 1992 in the Indian Ocean Newsletter, Africa Energy & Mining, Maghreb Confidential and the Lettre du Continent, all well the biographies of the most powerful persons in Africa published in the collection "The Top 100 People" and "The Permanent Guides" . The Country Channels propose direct access to information related to a specific country, and links to the best sites related to the country.

Africa is a Country

Africa is a Country, african diaspora Africa is a Country Of course we don’t literally believe Africa is a Country (unlike say rapper Rick Ross). The title of the blog is ironic and is a reaction to old and tired images of “Africa”. We deliberately challenge and destabilize received wisdom about the African continent and its people in Western media — that definition includes “old (nationally oriented) media,” new social media as well as “global news media”. Media here means more than journalism; it is also art, music, film, books, graphic design, etcetera. We don’t spend all our time criticizing though. We also celebrate and feature work that we think complicate the old, ahistoric and objectional images. We want to introduce our readers to work by Africans and non-Africans about the continent and its diaspora that have worked against the old and tired images of Africa. The blog is that, and more. As one of the core members of the collective, Neelika Jayawardane, explains it on our Facebook page, Africa is a Country is also about constructing a state of mind. One where the “nation” operates outside the borders of modern nation states in Africa and its continental and conceptual boundaries. So, yes, the blog announces that Africa is indeed a “country,” an imagined community whose “citizens” must reinvent the narrative and visual economy of Africa. Africa is a Country was founded by Sean Jacobs and developed over time—it wasn’t always clear what it would be become—into a collective of scholars, writers, artists, filmmakers, bloggers, and curators who together produce online commentary, original writing, media criticism, short videos, and photography. If all of that still doesn’t make sense, how’s this: This site is not about famine, Bono, or Barack Obama. Here are some of our projects: Africa is a Country Radio: A monthly round up of audio treats from around Africa and its diaspora with occasional commentary from the community of writers from Africasacountry.com. The host of Africa is a Country Radio is Chief Boima, a DJ and contributing editor for the website. His work aims to challenge genre definitions and categorization by drawing connections across geographic distances, language, and national borders – in the process asserting the contributions of Africans, wherever they are, to the now. Football is a Country: The big idea behind the page is to present a more global, postcolonial (for want for a better word) take on world football. The main focus of the page for the foreseeable future will be African football. What that means is quite broad — both the categories of “African” and “football” will be pretty elastic. As you can imagine, we take into account the forces of migration, media and identity politics. We promise the writing will be witty and insightful, alive to the history of the game and its social and political resonances, and we will not be afraid to make a bit of mischief where necessary. Check out our Facebook page and Twitter account for a taster of the kinds of things we’ll be covering. Football is a Country is edited by Sean Jacobs and Elliot Ross.

Africa Masterweb

Africa Masterweb Africa Masterweb Africa Masterweb is your gateway to Africa. Its primary objective is the cyber consolidation of African resources to enable its people harness them better and in addition provide the much needed information about the continent to prospective investors and the world in general. We will simplify and professionalized African web searches with a Masterweb Search Engine in due course. African Union with her regional economic communities, is well prepared and structured for the cyber age.

Africa Media Association (AMA)

Africa Media Association, AMA Africa Media Association (AMA) Africa Media Association (AMA) ? a media advocacy company that focuses on showcasing positive stories from African-Australian communities in response to the ongoing and overly negative portrayal of these communities in the?mainstream media organisations in Australia and beyond.? AMA is involved in? ?advocacy journalism? and seeks to use the media (openly and transparently)?as?an instrument?to pursue positive social changes for Afro-Australian communitesAMA also organises the Victorian African Community Awards (VACA). The VACAs are an opportunity to highlight the invaluable contribution that various individuals and organisations make to African-Australian communities by adding value to the lives of many and making Victoria a better place to be. VACA also provides an opportunity to celebrate leadership, entrepreneurship and service to the community, as a means to encourage younger African-Australians to go for their dreams and achieve their full potential. Nominations for the awards can be made at the AMA website.

Africa Missions Resource Center (AMRC)

Africa Missions Resource Center, AMRC Africa Missions Resource Center (AMRC) Africa Missions Resource Center (AMRC) is a web-based storehouse of information and outfitting for Christian Missions to Africa. AMRC does not claim to be be the fullest repository of Africa Missions relevant information it does contain helpful, insightful original documents and links to some of the best research and news sites pertaining to Africa and African Christian Missions. This information is targets Christian missions working in Africa and other philanthropic, development, and emergency response agencies working in on the continent of Africa. I am Richard Chowning, a Church Planting Consultant with Pioneer Bible Translators and serve on PBT's International Resource Team. I own and edit AMRC. AMRC was begun in 1994 while I was a Missionary in Residence at Abilene Christian University (1988-97). I served as a church planting missionary among the Kipsigiis people of Kenya for 16 years (1972-1988), and the Aja people of Benin for nine years (1997-2006). rchowning@africamissions.org

Africa Mpya Foundation

Africa Mpya Foundation, AMF Africa Mpya Foundation AMF is a not-for-profit organisation whose primary objective is to reform the role of money in society for the benefit of people and the environment. The founders of Africa Mpya Foundation (AMF) are a group of UK based Africans in the Diaspora. The group comprises of individuals with diverse professional skills, experiences, common roots and a passion for Africa. They were initially brought together by the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) under the Diaspora ChangeMakers programme with the aim of leveraging their expertise for the benefit of communities in both the Diaspora and Africa. AMF is a not-for-profit organisation whose primary objective is to reform the role of money in society for the benefit of people and the environment. This objective will be achieved by connecting the expertise and resources of Africans in the Diaspora with the financial, economic and educational opportunities of the African continent. AMF believes that Africans in the Diaspora will more effectively contribute to the development of Africa and their host communities in the UK if both their individual and collective aspirations are realised. Research has shown that people of African origin in the UK (and indeed elsewhere in Europe) face inordinate difficulties/barriers in accessing bank finance.1 A priority for the Foundation therefore is the establishment of a bank, registered and head-quartered in the UK. It will have an overriding commitment to improving access to finance for the Diaspora community. This has the potential to have transformative effects on not only individuals and businesses in the diaspora community, but also on the host country as well as their countries of origin. The Foundation’s philosophy and its not-for-profit objectives however do not start and end with the establishment of the proposed bank. They will continue in parallel to those of the bank, and it is expected that the proposed bank will devote a proportion of its annual profit to the Foundation’s wider causes in education, health, housing, job-creation, among others, both in Diaspora and Africa. Vision AMF’s vision is: “To be an organisation that contributes to the improvement in the quality of life of both in the Diaspora and Africa”. In this context, quality of life encompasses financial, educational, housing, employment, health, gender, and environment considerations. Mission The mission of AMF is to reform the role of money in society so that it benefits and addresses the needs of people and the environment in order to enable our planet to thrive. Values underlying the Foundation The fundamental values that underpin the AMF’s operations and strategic objectives are as follows: Dedication: A deep dedication to serving the narrow and wider financial, social and economic needs of both the Diaspora and Africa. Integrity: The Foundation will adhere to the highest personal and professional standards of integrity in dealings with all its stakeholders. Ethical base: Ethical considerations will underlie all decisions regarding the Foundation’s operations and interactions with its stakeholders and the wider environment. Transparency: The Foundation will be accountable and transparent in all its dealings with various stakeholders, which will include donors, sponsors, intended programme beneficiaries, staff and the general public. Inclusivity: The focus of the Foundation is on serving the needs of both the Diaspora and African. This however will not preclude other individuals or communities outside this group, who share the Foundation’s ideals and passion, from working for the Foundation or benefitting from its activities and services.

Africa Peace Point

Africa Peace Point Africa Peace Point Founded in 1998, Africa Peace Point (APP) is a non-profit and non-religious organization. APP offers a safe and supportive environment where the grassroots peace initiatives can air their views and learn listening, communication and other conflict resolution techniques that allow them to develop concern for one another.

Africa Platform for Development Effectiveness

Africa Platform for Development Effectiveness Africa Platform for Development Effectiveness Endorsed by the 15th African Union (AU) Summit of July 2010, the Africa Platform for Development Effectiveness (APDEv) was officially launched by the AU on Sunday,27 March 2011 during the 4th AU/ECA Joint Annual Meetings of Conference of African Ministers of Finance, Planning and Economic Development scheduled for 24-29 March 2011 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. APDEv is an African-led and owned physical and virtual multi-stakeholder platform and organizing mechanism for mobilizing African policy makers and practitioners towards achieving sustainable development results. The Platform focuses on 3 inter-related themes of Aid Effectiveness and South-South Cooperation with CapacityDevelopment as a core driver for development effectiveness (DE) fostering ?knowledge and evidence-based innovation processes? which is one of the six cornerstonesof the AU-NEPAD CDSF.

Africa Progress Panel

Africa Progress Panel, APP Africa Progress Panel The Africa Progress Panel (APP) consists of ten distinguished individuals from the private and public sector who advocate for equitable and sustainable development for Africa. Mr Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel laureate, chairs the APP and is closely involved in its day-to-day work. The life experiences of Panel members give them a formidable capability to access a wide cross-section of society including at the highest levels in Africa and across the globe. As a result, the Panel functions in a unique policy space with the ability to target decision-making audiences, including African and other world leaders, heads of state, leaders of industry, plus a broad range of stakeholders at the global, regional, and national levels. The Panel facilitates coalition building to leverage and broker knowledge, and convene decision-makers to influence policy and create change for Africa. The Panel has extensive networks of policy analysts across Africa. By bringing together experts with a focus on Africa, the APP contributes to generating evidence-based policies.

Africa Renewal Online

Africa Renewal Online Africa Renewal Online The Africa Renewal information programme, produced by the Africa Section of the United Nations Department of Public Information, provides up-to-date information and analysis of the major economic and development challenges facing Africa today. Among the major items it produces is the renowned magazine, Africa Renewal (formerly Africa Recovery), which first appeared in 1987. It also produces a range of public information materials, including backgrounders, press releases and feature articles. It works with the media in Africa and beyond to promote the work of the United Nations, Africa and the international community to bring peace and development to Africa.

Africa Society of The National Summit on Africa

Africa Society of The National Summit on Africa Africa Society of The National Summit on Africa The Africa Society is a national nonprofit, nonpartisan and diverse organization formed as a direct outgrowth of the National Summit on Africa, which launched in 1997 with grant support from the Ford Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. This initiative resulted in the largest mobilization of Africa-interested individuals in the history of the U.S., with delegations from every state and territory. After contemplating how best to meet the needs and demands of nearly 20,000 constituents, the Summit?s Board of Directors and Secretariat voted to establish an organization devoted to educating Americans of all backgrounds, ages and statuses about the continent of Africa. To meet this goal, The Africa Society was launched in January 2002 at an event sponsored by one of its primary partners, Discovery Communications, LLC. Since, the Society has developed a wide range of educational programs targeting every age group and academic level.

Africa South of Sahara (Stanford University)

Africa South of Sahara, Stanford University Africa South of Sahara (Stanford University) Africa South of Sahara, Stanford University is ...

Africa Style Daily

Africa Style Daily Africa Style Daily Africa Style Daily (ASD) is the premier site for fashion news, profiles and portraits about Africa and Africans on the continent and in the diaspora. It was founded in 2009 by journalist, Zandile Blay. ASD is part of Africa Daily Groupe (ADG), a digital publishing group focused on thoughtful, thorough reportage on a myriad of topics concerning the continent.

Africa Time For Peace

Africa Time For Peace Africa Time For Peace Africa Time For Peace est une plateforme sur les musiques africaines, favorisant le dialogue interculturel ainsi que la promotion d'artistes.

Africa TV

Africa TV Africa TV Many in the world are heralding the dawn of an “African Millennium”. Culturally and politically, Africa is poised to undergo more changes and wield more influence in the world than ever before. However, much of what is visually documented about Africa is a view from outside, seen through eyes that are not African and, in some cases, not Africa friendly. Only if Africans can present their stories to the world will Africa gain renewed respect and authentically express her promising future. Our mission is to provide a global voice for Africans to tell their own stories to the world. The Company Africa TV One is the world’s leading broadcaster of African ethnic television over broadband internet as measure by the number of African channels and TV stations listed on our network. With over 40 channels from 30 African countries, African TV One has built a proprietary transmission infrastructure to solve the key problem of bringing the audiovisual contents from Africa to the rest of the world. Africa TV One acts as a bridge, a mirror and a window into Africa. It is a mirror in which African Diasporas can look and stay in touch with what is going on in their home countries. It is also a bridge for African-Americans and others of African descent to connect to their cultural and historic roots and it is a window through which those wanting to know more about and be a part of the African experience can look to see its diversity and richness of culture. Africa TV One believes there is a significant demand for high quality, family-oriented, pan-African programming that is not dominated by excessive violence, explicit sexual themes and foul language. The Company has carved a niche by connecting the millions of African expatriates, African-Americans, and Caribbean people living in North America and Europe with a high quality cultural experience that not only they can identify with, but that peoples of all races can enjoy. The demand for high quality pan-African programming has never been greater. Africa TV one viewers represent a very viable market that will continue to expand as more people come to depend on Over-the-Internet video delivery in search of high quality pan-African programming and content. Properly executed, Africa TV One will be credited for the creation of the world’s first global Over-the-Internet video delivery network delivering high quality programming for and about Africa and a pan-African Diaspora.

Africa University

Africa University Africa University Africa University is a, "private, Pan-African and United Methodist-Related institution." It has more than 1,200 students from 22 African countries. It is located 17 km northwest of Mutare, Zimbabwe's fourth largest city.

Africa Works

Africa Works Africa Works Africa Works is a project that allows users experience different aspects of life in Africa - travel, education, business and civil society. We bring you a virtual tour of Africa through videocasts, blogs and photo imagery. In addition, Africa Works provide, on demand, authenticated data and information on country-specific environments to help you make informed decision about traveling, learning or investing in Africa.

Africa Writes

Africa Writes Africa Writes The Africa Writes festival is an annual celebration of contemporary literature from Africa and the diaspora brought to you by The Royal African Society. Every year we showcase established and emerging talent from the African continent and its diaspora in what is now the UK’s biggest celebration of contemporary African writing taking place over an exciting summer weekend. The festival features book launches, readings, author appearances, panel discussions, youth and children’s workshops, and other activities. Our previous headline speakers have been Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ngugi wa Thiong’o with son Mukoma wa Ngugi, Wole Soyinka, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ben Okri and Nawal El Saadawi. About the RAS The Royal African Society is Britain’s prime Africa organisation with more than a century of in-depth knowledge and experience of the continent and its peoples. We foster a better understanding of Africa in the UK and throughout the world, exploring the continent’s history, politics, culture, problems and potential. We disseminate knowledge and insight to make a positive difference to Africa’s development and celebrate the diversity and depth of African culture. About our Partners Africa Writes is organised by The Royal African Society in partnership with a host of like-minded organisations and individuals. This year some of our partners include African Reading Group (ARG!), Afrikult., Arts Council England, Black Reading Group, Bookshy Blogger, British Museum, Brunel University African Poetry Prize, The Caine Prize, Centre of African Studies at The University of London, Commonwealth Writers, Grange Hotels, Granta, Hay Festival, Jacaranda, Journal of African Cultural Studies, Miles Morland Foundation, SIDENSI, The Literary Consultancy, TedxEuston and our main partner, The British Library. About the British Library The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilisation and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website – www.bl.uk – every year where they can view up to 4 million digitised collection items and over 40 million pages. www.africawrites.org www.royalafricansociety.org www.facebook.com/africawrites www.twitter.com/AfricaWritesUK

Africa-America Institute (AAI)

Africa-America Institute, AAI Africa-America Institute (AAI) Founded in 1953, The Africa-America Institute (AAI) is a premier U.S.-based international organization dedicated to strengthening human capacity of Africans and promoting the continent’s development through higher education and skills training, convening activities, program implementation and management. AAI raises funds to develop programs that focus on leadership and management, vocational training and entrepreneurship to help African youth develop leadership skills, become globally competitive and find sustainable employment.

Africa-Do-Business.com

Africa-Do-Business.com, Africa-Do-Business, Africa Do Business Africa-Do-Business.com About the Founder, Juvenal Turatsinze Juvenal Turatsinze Africa Do Business My name is Juvenal Turatsinze. I am the founder of Africa-Do-Business.com. I am qualified as an Agricultural and Food Engineer and I have a Master's Degree in Development Studies. Currently, I am a Freelance Development Consultant. My interventions focus primarily on food security, small industry and enterprise development in African countries. I have 22 years of professional experience of development work in the sectors of food security, rural development, small enterprise development and small industry. I have worked in many African countries, including Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, etc. I have been actively involved in various programmes funded by major international donors and international agencies, including the European Union, the World Bank, USAID, etc. I have initiated development projects that have fundraised more than USD 50 million for poor African communities. In my work as a development expert, I have come to the conclusion that Africa will never eradicate poverty by relying mainly on aid, generosity and charity of developed counties. African countries can only come out of poverty if Africans themselves engage in industry, trade and businesses that create wealth by tapping into immense resources available on the continent. Now, the goal is to Do Business and Trade and not to rely on external Aid; have more African Investment and less Foreign Direct Investment(FDI)... Let us decide to engage and do business in African countries. It is possible to use the resources we have now to start our own business, make profits, generate income, create employment and ultimately reduce poverty in Africa. www.africa-do-business.com is now here to guide you to best investment opportunities and best business project ideas for you to start your own business or help someone else to do it. Please visit us regularly and let others know.... Africans together, Africa will rise! Juvenal Turatsinze Founder and Manager

Africa-Europe Development Platform

Africa-Europe Development Platform Africa-Europe Development Platform As African Diaspora organisations seek an adequate framework to engage migration and development stakeholders, the European Commission in cooperation with the Swiss SDC, the Dutch MFA and the German GIZ have facilitated the Africa-Europe Platform‘s creation as part of the European-wide African Diaspora Platform for Development (EADPD) Project. As an EC funded initiative the creation of the Africa-Europe Platform will foster the valuable contribution to African Development by already established African Diaspora/Migrant organisation based in all 27 EU states including Norway and Switzerland. The Africa-Europe Platform (AEP) is designed to be an inclusive interactive and informative space reflecting the interconnectivity at the heart of migration and development issues. The platform aims are as follow: To strengthen the contributions of the African Diaspora as contributors in Africa’s development via the establishment of an interactive inclusive European-wide platform of African Diaspora/migrant organizations To enhance the coordination, communication and cooperation of development activities undertaken by African Migrant organisations through the development of best practice and knowledge exchange tools and mechanisms. To improve migrant organisations’ capacities to actively take part in platform activities, involve themselves in policy processes and effectively implement development projects. To reinforce channels between Diaspora organisations and their local partners in Africa This initiative is the result of a partnership between the African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) from the Netherland, Forum des Organisations de Solidarité Internationale (FORIM) from France, Coordination Générale des Migrants pour le Développement (CGMD) from Belgium, the African Foundation for Development (AFFORD) from the UK, and the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD). The project kicked-off following a series of meeting in March 2011 and begun its activities through the collaboration of the five organisations. The Africa-Europe’s creation marks a significant step in cementing the African Diaspora’s position into the international development arena and reflects the endorsement of the migration and development sector by International development leaders particularly the European Union.

Africa-Europe Platform

Africa-Europe Platform Africa-Europe Platform The overall objective of AEDP (formerly known as the European-wide African Diaspora Platform for Development (EADPD) Project) is to promote the contribution of the diaspora to the development of Africa through the creation of a network of the African diaspora in Europe: the Africa-Europe Development Platform (hereafter referred to as "AEP", "AEDP" or "Platform"). The AEDP is a network of African diaspora organisations and networks from the 27 EU Member States plus Switzerland and Norway. Through the Platform, the capacity of the African diaspora in Europe to contribute to Africa's development will be made visible and enhanced. It is an innovative space to share knowledge, accumulate ideas and create strategies together to participate meaningfully in the development cooperation process in Africa. In other words, this Platform allows for improvement in coordination, communication and cooperation of development activities undertaken by African migrant organisations, by sharing information, knowledge and expertise. Through the Platform, the African Diaspora in Europe can establish links and partnerships with important stakeholders such as European and African co-development organisations, policymakers in the field of migration and development, the European Union and the African Union.

Africa.com

Africa.com Africa.com Carefully Selected News, Travel, Information & Lifestyle. Our Team: Press Releases Buzz Speaking Media Partnerships

Africa.com - Carefully Selected News, Travel, Information & Lifestyle

Africa.com Africa.com - Carefully Selected News, Travel, Information & Lifestyle Carefully Selected News, Travel, Information & Lifestyle. Africa.com has representative offices in Johannesburg, South Africa; Lagos, Nigeria; Nairobi, Kenya; and New York, USA

AfricaCareerGuidance

AfricaCareerGuidance AfricaCareerGuidance Mission: The mission of the AfricaRecruit Online Career Guidance Service is to provide students and graduates of African University access to information on career opportunities in Africa?s established and emerging sectors. The service will assist graduates/new labour market entrants, seasoned workers, and unemployed in making informed decision on careers choices leading to being employable as opposed unemployable and unemployed. Objectives: The AfricaRecruit online career guidance service is an opportunity to radically change the way information is disseminated in order to reach a wider audience. This career guidance service will be a virtual one-stop career information center for African students and graduates on the range of employment opportunities in established and emerging markets in Africa or respective home nation. This will give access and choice thus making them more marketable. Ultimately, this service will improve the efficiency of education systems and labour market, as the education and employment policies seek to widen choices and create systems that can respond to varying needs across the lifespan.

AfricaFertilizer.org

AfricaFertilizer.org AfricaFertilizer.org AfricaFertilizer.org is a global Internet forum created to disseminate and exchange? information on various aspects of fertilizer, soil fertility and related agricultural issues that impact Africa. Such information will be used to initiate and fuel the African Green Revolution that hundreds of millions of smallholder farmers so desperately need and deserve.

AfricaFiles

AfricaFiles AfricaFiles A network of volunteers relaying African perspectives and alternative analyses to promote justice and human rights.

Africaguinee.com, Dernieres nouvelles de la Guinee et de l'Afrique

Africaguinee.com, Africaguinnee Africaguinee.com, Dernieres nouvelles de la Guinee et de l'Afrique Organigramme de l’équipe d’Africaguinee.com Fondé en Septembre 2006 par le journaliste guinéen Mamadou Kaba Souaré, Africaguinee.com est un site d'informations générales sur la Guinée et l'Afrique. Avec une quinzaine de collaborateurs basés principalement à Conakry (Guinée) et Genève (Suisse), son réseau de correspondants bénévoles en Afrique et en Europe ; Africaguinee.com est devenu un site de référence en Afrique francophone. A la fois neutres et objectives, les informations et analyses fournies par Africaguinee.com sont des références sûres et crédibles pour les personnalités politiques, les institutions guinéennes, les organisations régionales et internationales, les chercheurs et ONG qui s'intéressent à la Guinée et l'Afrique.

African & African Diaspora Studies Program

African & African Diaspora Studies Program African & African Diaspora Studies Program The mission of the FIU African & African Diaspora Studies Program (AADS) is to develop its recognition as a leading Program in the interdisciplinary field of African & African diaspora studies, and related fields of inquiry. Our goal is to be internationally renowned, nationally competitive, and locally meaningful in order to contribute to the University’s objective of serving the people of South Florida, the state, the nation, and the international communities. The undergraduate and graduate instruction and services of the Program are designed to: Provide an excellent university education while challenging and stimulating students and participants to engage in, and develop skills for, critical thinking so that they can contribute to the development of the field and to the betterment of their communities' cultural, aesthetic, social, political, and economic environments; Generate new knowledge and research opportunities in African and African diaspora studies through the support of faculty research and exemplary teaching, and through the organization of stimulating conferences and colloquia of interest and relevance to the diverse populations of South Florida; Be dedicated to expose the university’s student body and external communities to the rich and diverse theoretical, political, and aesthetic bodies of work of scholars, artists, and political figures throughout the history of our fields; Develop original research projects focused on, and of great significance for, the local populations. The African & African Diaspora Studies Program seeks to foster greater understanding of the experiences of peoples of African descent, internationally.

African & Middle Eastern Reading Room

African & Middle Eastern Reading Room African & Middle Eastern Reading Room The African & Middle Eastern Reading Room is the primary public access point for materials housed in the the African and Middle Eastern Division (AMED) which include a variety of vernacular scripts, such as Amharic, Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Yiddish. Covering 77 countries from Morocco to Southern Africa to the Central Asian republics of the former Soviet Union, the division's three sections--African, Hebraic, and Near East--offer in-depth reference assistance, provide substantive briefings on a wide range of subjects relating to these languages and cultures, produce guides to the Library's vast resources and cooperate in developing and preserving the Division's unparalleled collections.

AFRICAN ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES (ACALAN)

AFRICAN ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES, ACALAN AFRICAN ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES (ACALAN) The Statutes of ACALAN were adopted by the Khartoum Summit of the AU Heads of State and Government Affiliate institution: Department for Social Affairs of the African Union Commission Headquarters : Bamako, Mali Vision/Mission: Fostering Africa’s integration and development through the development and promotion of the use of African languages in all domains of life in Africa Core Values: Respect for the cultural values of Africa, especially African languages on behalf of the African Union; Integration of the African continent for an endogenous development; linguistic and cultural diversity as a factor of Africa’s integration and the promotion of African values including an encouragement of mutuality and solidarity amongst Africans Objectives: -To empower African languages in general and Vehicular Cross-Border Languages in particular, in partnership with the languages inherited from colonization; - To promote convivial and functional multilingualism at every level, especially in the education sector; - To ensure the development and promotion of African languages as factors of African integration and development, of respect for values and mutual understanding and peace

African Academy of Sciences

African Academy of Sciences, AAS African Academy of Sciences Vision TO BE THE ENGINE FOR DRIVING SUSTAINABLE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA. Mission The AAS mission is to serve, first, as an honorific society with the primary function of honouring African science and technology achievers and, second, as a development-oriented mobiliser of the entire African science and technology community with the fundamental role of facilitating the development of scientific and technological capacity for science-led development in Africa, promoting excellence and relevance in doing so. Strategy The AAS has been repositioning itself to proactively and aggressively respond to the challenges Africa faces by developing its five-year strategy in 2013 .The Academy’s goal is to help shape Africa’s agenda for science and contribute to developing the field. The AAS elects Fellows, who are proven science, technology and innovation leaders, policy advisors and thinkers most of whom live and work throughout the continent. The Academy also gives prizes, funds research that is relevant to Africa’s challenges, and works with policymakers to develop science strategies. The AAS’ work is covered in three areas: Recognising excellence Implementing science, technology and innovation programmes Providing think-tank functions. THE AAS IS A PAN AFRICAN ORGANISATION HEADQUARTERED IN KENYA, WHICH AIMS TO DRIVE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA THROUGH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION. It has a tripartite mandate of pursuing excellence by recognising scholars and achievers; providing advisory and think tank functions for shaping the continent’s strategies and policies; and implementing key science, technology and innovation programmes. The AAS utilises its membership pool which consists of a community of scientists to engage with governments and policy makers on the continent. The membership comprises individuals who have reached the highest level of excellence in their field of expertise and have made contributions to the advancement of the field on the continent. To date AAS has recognised 330 AAS Fellows and Associate and Honorary Fellows who are proven science, technology and innovation leaders, policy advisors and thinkers most of whom live and work throughout the continent. Relevant specialist committees assess nominees and those that are recommended are subsequently voted in by AAS Fellows and finally approved by the Governing Council. The AAS is the only continental academy in Africa, enjoying the support and recognition of NEPAD and the African Union as well as several governments and major international partners. These bodies also recognise the think-tank functions of the academy and its increasing role in setting the research agenda for the future development of the continent. The AAS is implementing programmes in partnership with pan African and international organisations. In 2015, the AAS launched the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa, a platform created in collaboration with the New Partnership for Africa’s (NEPAD) Agency. AESA is an agenda setting and funding platform to support the development of Africa’s research leadership and promote scientific excellence and innovation to overcome some of Africa’s developmental challenges. The current Strategic Plan of the AAS (2013-2018) identifies six STI areas of focus, namely Climate Change. Health and Wellbeing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Water and Sanitation Food Security and Nutritional Wellbeing Sustainable Energy. THE ACADEMY WAS FOUNDED IN 1985 FOLLOWING A PROPOSAL PRESENTED BY THE RENOWNED ENTOMOLOGIST THOMAS ODHIAMBO AT THE INAUGURAL MEETING OF TWAS, THE WORLD ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, IN TRIESTE, ITALY. Odhiambo led a taskforce on the creation of the Academy, which presented its recommendations at a meeting convened on 10 December 1985. Participants at the meeting unanimously adopted the recommendations, turned the gathering into a General Assembly and drafted and adopted the Academy’s founding constitution, which has since been updated (link). The 33 participants who attended the General Assembly also became the founding fellows of the Academy. The Academy also developed and implemented four strategies between 1989 and 2005 that focused on forestry research, biotechnology, soil and water management, improved food production and policy and advocacy. In 1988 the AAS launched the journal Discovery and Innovation, which focused on all areas of science and ran until 2012. The AAS continued to grow in the ensuing years and bought its current premises in the upmarket suburb of Karen in Nairobi in 1992. THE AAS HAS BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN CONTRIBUTING TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE IN AFRICA. AREAS WHERE THE ACADEMY HAS MADE AN IMPACT ARE: The number of fellows has grown from 33 in 1985 to the current 300. The number of female fellows has also grown significantly since the establishment of the Academy. The AAS gave over a 100 grants for forestry research to African scientists in the 10 years that it ran the Capacity Building in Forestry Research in Africa project. It also facilitated the development of a common position for Africa, which strengthened the continent’s negotiating muscle in the International Forum on Forest. Through the African Forest Research Network the AAS trained 150 postgraduate students and gave grants that helped African institutions to buy equipment and helped to develop the careers of grantees with many presenting at conferences. The AAS’ Capacity Building in Soil and Water Management project, which ran from 1989 to 1993, trained masters students from 10 African countries and funded collaborative projects between 80 research institutions that helped improve run off farming in Eritrea, the management of irrigation in Sudan and for Zimbabwe to find ways to use wetlands in dry regions for farming. The Academy’s African Training Leadership and Advanced Skills provided research grants and internships for women, helping them to develop their careers and organised meetings that provided platforms for scientists to share their research. The AAS has also published profiles of over a 1,000 African scientists, a resource that can be used to identify potential partners and experts to help governments in evidence policymaking. African presidents and senior government officials attended the AAS’ Research and Development Forum for Science-led Development in Africa, which contributed to efforts to raise the profile of science among policymakers. The AAS hosted the World Academy of Sciences Regional Office for sub-Saharan Africa (TWAS-ROSSA) from 2003 to 2014. During this time, the programme honoured over 70 scientists through the TWAS Regional Prize, the TWAS-ROSSA Young Scientists’ Prize, the TWAS-AAS-Microsoft Award for Young Scientists, TWAS Young Affiliates and Biovision travel grant. The AAS also organised the Young Scientists Conferences every year to provide a platform for young scientists to network with their peers and senior scientists and to share their research. The Academy also supported capacity building activities of TWAS’ eight national chapters in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe and facilitated collaboration between its Arab; Latin America and the Caribbean; East and Southâ��East Asia; and the Pacific and Central and South Asia regional offices.

African Achievers International

African Achievers International African Achievers International AfIA is managed by African Achievers International a Company registered in England and Wales and Kenya with a certificate of Compliance with links in a number of countries around the world. It is also a subsidiary program of NILE African Development [NAD] a Charity registered in England and Wales and Kenya. AfIA Social Movement: AfIAs have now shifted from just awards to a social movement; we hope to focus our communication strategy towards high-impact non-profit organisations, social entrepreneurs, business executives, grant-makers and other progressively-minded change makers.

African Advocacy Network

African Advocacy Network African Advocacy Network AAN serves the growing Diaspora with community-based services focusing in legal assistance, social services and psycho-social case management, as well as promoting cultural integration through the arts. AAN couples these programs with experienced and trained linguistic capacity in more than ten languages that span the African continent such as Amharic, Tigrinya, and Arabic to French, Wolof, Berber, Sonufu, and more. AAN is a project of Dolores Street Community Services. SOCIAL JUSTICE: The AAN is committed to the basic belief that every immigrant has dignity and protection under the law. To that degree, our agency stays active in a host of conferences, empowerment activities, and networking with other civil rights and immigrant rights groups. AAN processes legal cases ranging from naturalization, work authorization, to family unification. It has particular experience in preparing asylum applicants for the process. AAN consistently supports and advocates for just immigration policy designed to advance opportunities for immigrants and refugees. AAN is a proud member of the 13 member coalition of the San Francisco Immigrant Legal and Education Network (SFILEN). AAN actively refers clients that face challenging immigration issues to lawyers who provide pro bono and affordable legal services, especially within SFILEN.

African Advocacy network (AAN)

African Advocacy network, AAN African Advocacy network (AAN) African Advocacy network (AAN) serves the growing Diaspora with community-based services focusing in legal assistance, social services and psycho-social case management, as well as promoting cultural integration through the arts. AAN couples these programs with experienced and trained linguistic capacity in more than ten languages that span the African continent such as Amharic, Tigrinya, and Arabic to French, Wolof, Berber, Sonufu, and more. AAN is a project of Dolores Street Community Services

African Affairs Advisory Group

African Affairs Advisory Group African Affairs Advisory Group The African Affairs Advisory Group serves as liaison between the African communities and the county government. The purpose of the African Affairs Advisory Group is to ensure that the County Executive is well informed of and able to act effectively to respond to the needs and concerns of African immigrants living/and or working in Montgomery County. he advisory group meets on the second Thursday of every month at the Silver Spring Civic Building. The AAAG has exceeded its goals every year. The African Affairs Advisory Group serves as liaison between the African communities and the County government. The purpose of the African Affairs Advisory Group is to ensure that the County Executive is well informed of and able to act effectively to respond to the needs and concerns of African immigrants living/and or working in Montgomery County. The Advisory Group is comprised of a chair and vice chair who are designated by and serve at the pleasure of the County Executive and approximately 30 political, religious, and other leaders in the African community. The Advisory Group’s primary tasks include: advise the County government on the needs and concerns of African immigrants in Montgomery County, including but not limited to policy initiatives, budget priorities, economic and other partnership opportunities, and help County agencies with access for the implementation of programs; reach out to the African immigrant community in Montgomery County to bring their needs and concerns to the attention of the County government and to inform them of County programs and resources; identify opportunities for increasing the cultural competence of the County government workforce to better serve African immigrants in the County; identify opportunities for increasing the capacity of nonprofit organizations and faith communities serving African immigrants in the County; and identify opportunities for collaboration of public, community, and private organizations to better serve the County's African immigrant community.

African Affairs Committee

African Affairs Committee African Affairs Committee The African Affairs Committee is committed to strengthening the rule of law and promoting social and economic development in Africa. The Committee closely follows legal, political, economic and social developments in Africa. The primary focus of the Committee is to investigate, understand and report on legal and policy developments on the Continent. In so doing, the Committee regularly sponsors Africa-related speakers and events, many of which are open to the public. Similarly, subcommittees investigate and report on specific issues (such as African business development, gender issues and the administration of justice) to judicial or legal organizations, government officials and other relevant decision-makers. The Committee aspires to build lasting relationships with African leaders and institutions. Meetings with preeminent African jurists, government officials, and other key persons are frequently conducted. These meetings give the Committee insight into current events from an African perspective. The Committee also aims to foster meaningful connections with other individuals and organizations with an interest in Africa, and regularly meets with US-based professional, governmental and advocacy groups.

African Affairs Journal

African Affairs Journal African Affairs Journal African Affairs is published on behalf of the Royal African Society and is the top ranked journal in African Studies. It is an inter-disciplinary journal, with a focus on the politics and international relations of sub-Saharan Africa … African Affairs is published on behalf of the Royal African Society and is the top ranked journal in African Studies. It is an inter-disciplinary journal, with a focus on the politics and international relations of sub-Saharan Africa. It also includes sociology, anthropology, economics, and to the extent that articles inform debates on contemporary Africa, history, literature, art, music and more. Each issue of African Affairs contains new original research articles, as well as briefings on contemporary issues, and research notes on ethical and methodological challenges. There is also a substantial section of book reviews, with occasional review articles. Impact Factor and Ranking Year Impact Factor Ssi: Area Studies Ssi: Political Science 2016 2.577 1 out of 69 18 out of 165 2015 1.904 1 out of 69 23 out of 163 2014 1.945 1 out of 65 16 out of 161 2013 1.554 1 out of 63 23 out of 156 2012 1.474 2 out of 65 27 out of 157 2011 1.544 3 out of 66 18 out of 148 2010 1.490 1 out of 60 20 out of 139 2009 1.660 2 out of 44 10 out of 112 2008 1.264 2 out of 38 2007 1.098 2 out of 37 2006 0.852 3 out of 34 This information is taken from the Journal Citation Reports, published annually by ISI. Abstracting and Indexing Services African Affairs is covered by the following abstracting and indexing services: Abstracts in Anthropology Africa-Wide America: History and Life Anthropological Index Online British Humanities Index CAB Abstracts Criminal Justice Abstracts CSA Worldwide Political Science Abstracts Current Contents® /Social and Behavioral Sciences Expanded academic ASAP Geographical Abstracts Global Health Historical Abstracts Humanities Index/Abstracts/Full Text IBSS Infotrac International Bibliography of the Social Sciences International Development Abstracts International Index to Black Periodicals International Political Science Abstracts Journal Citation Reports /Social Sciences Edition Peace Research Abstracts Periodicals Index Online (PIO) PROQUEST DATABASE : Magazines PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest 5000 PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest 5000 International PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest Central PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest Discovery PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest International Academic Research Library PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest News & Magazines PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest Platinum PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest Political Science PROQUEST DATABASE : ProQuest Research Library Public Affairs Information Services (PAIS) Social Science Research Network (SSRN) Social Sciences Citation Index® Social Scisearch® Sociological Abstracts Tropical Diseases Bulletin Wilson OmniFile Full Text Mega Edition World Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology Abstracts

African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAADS)

African American and African Diaspora Studies, AAADS African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAADS) The Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAADS) is a multidisciplinary department of the College of Arts and Sciences, offering the bachelor of arts, the master of arts, and PhD. A minor at the doctoral level is also offered. It is the mission of AAADS to create and share scholarship of the highest quality dealing with the African American and African diasporic experience; promote the study and understanding of the historical and contemporary connections among Africans, African Americans, and other New World black communities; and affirm the democratic tradition of equal opportunity for all by combating all forms of discrimination based on ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, and religious differences. To fulfill our mission, AAADS introduces students to a wide range of current research and scholarly opinion on the history, culture, and social status of black Americans and their African heritage, as well as a breadth of topics on the African diaspora. As an intellectual enterprise, the department provides an interdisciplanary analysis of the African American and African diasporic experience. As a humanistic discipline in the democratic tradition, AAADS seeks to dispel the myths and expose the attitudes that perpetuate racism in American life. Toward these ends, the department assumes the ongoing responsibility of creating materials and conducting seminal research that aids in the development and shaping of African American and African diaspora studies as a discipline.

African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University

African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University, African American and Diaspora Studies African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University The study of Africans, African Americans and African descent people emerges from a rich, distinguished, and exciting past that continues to influence our present realities. Indeed, the black presence in both the New and Old Worlds has been co-constitutive to the very making of those worlds so much so that studying this presence in its forms and consequences is a foundational moral and educational necessity. To that end, the Program in African American & Diaspora Studies (PAADS) offers an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and comparative study of the lived experiences of Blacks dispersed throughout the world from the continent of Africa, a dispersion (and its causes) referred to as the African diaspora. We examine the histories, politics, economies, social worlds, literatures, music, and visual cultures of multicultural and diverse African descent people in the Americas (North & Latin America), the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa itself. Because all cultures in the Atlantic world and beyond have been deeply affected by the consequences of the African Diaspora, African American and Diaspora Studies has been in the vanguard of shaping important questions and debates worldwide, including those about race, gender, culture, class, identities, labor, sexuality, and color. Through the exploration of these fascinating topics, PAADS encourages the development of strong analytical and critical thinking, oral communication, and writing skills, as well as the ability to approach issues from multiple perspectives. The Program combines coursework, study abroad, service-learning, and internship with personalized faculty-student relationships, conferences, and a lecture series to create a dynamic, enlightening, and life-defining intellectual experience. “If you should penetrate the campus of an American Ivy League college and, challenging a Senior, ask what, in his opinion was the influence of Africa on the French Revolution, he would answer in surprise if not pity, “None.” If, after due apology, you ventured to approach his teacher of “historiography,” provided such sacrilege were possible, you would be told that between African slavery in America and the greatest revolution of Europe, there was of course some connection, since both took place on the same earth; but nothing casual, nothing of real importance, since Africans have no history.” –W. E. B. Du Bois, The Negro in the French Revolution, 1962

African American Art on the Internet

African American Art on the Internet, African American African American Art on the Internet Everything about African American Art on the Internet, African Individual Artists, African Galleries and Sellers, African Art,

African American Baptist Mission Collaboration

African American Baptist Mission Collaboration African American Baptist Mission Collaboration Our Mission: The African American Baptist Mission Collaboration seeks to help rebuild, revitalize and advocate for Haiti in wake of the January 2010 earthquake. The AABMC was formed in February 2010 and is a partnership of five Baptist communities representing more than 40,000 churches and more than 10 million Christians nationwide, most of whom are of African American heritage. AABMC Mission The African American Baptist Mission Collaboration seeks to help rebuild, revitalize and advocate for Haiti in wake of the January 2010 earthquake. Read more about AABMC Mission What We Are Responding To Formed in response to the suffering of our sisters and brothers in the Republic of Haiti following the 12 January 2010 earthquake, AABMC will link resources to achieve the following: To create synergies by collaborating with financial support and technical assistance in responses of relief , recovery and reconstruction of: 5 hospitals/clinics, 50 schools, 500 churches, and 5000 homes To engage in ongoing programs of service delivery and sustainable development Read more about What We Are Responding To Members/Conventions The African American Baptist Missions Collaboration (AABMC) is a partnership of Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention; National Baptist Convention, USA; National Baptist Convention of America; National Missionary Baptist Convention of America; and Progressive National Baptist Convention.

African American Civil War Museum

African American Civil War Museum, African American, Civil War Museum, African American Museum African American Civil War Museum The mission of the African American Civil War Museum is to preserve and tell the stories of the United States Colored Troops and African American involvement in the American Civil War. We utilize a rich collection of primary resources, educational programming and technology to create a meaningful learning experience focused on this pivotal time in American history. We hope your experience will be rewarding as you explore these 19th century heroes with us. For lectures or group visits contact the museum by email at info(at)afroamcivilwar.org

African American Political Pundit

African American Political Pundit African American Political Pundit About: A 2008 DNCC Credentialed Democratic National Convention Blogger. An old school brother who gives his thoughts, opinions and insights on political and social issues of the day. He shares this blog platform with others interested in candid, honest reciprocal conversation about political and social issues impacting our diverse American communities. AAPP is available for political conversations, speaking engagements, panel discussions, interviews, academic discussion groups and other events.

African Ancestry

African Ancestry African Ancestry African Ancestry is the ONLY company that traces your ancestry back to a specific present-day African country of origin and often to a specific African ethnic group when African ancestry is found. Our tests are designed to determine the ancestry of a direct maternal lineage and/or a direct paternal lineage, one at a time.

African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College

African and African Diaspora Studies, Boston College African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College The African and African Diaspora Studies Program at Boston College, originally called the Black Studies Program, began in 1969-1970 along side BC’s “Black Talent Program,” two parts of an effort to recruit talented Black students from across the country to study at this university. This program was a direct response to Father General Pedro Arupe’s 1968 “Inter-Racial Apostolate” letter to Jesuit Colleges and universities and a consequence of discussions begun in 1967 between then BC President Michael Walsh, S.J. and Boston community leaders Mel King and Bryant Rollins. The Black Studies Program was part of an academic initiative to bring more African American students to the university and to make its undergraduate curriculum more broadly reflect a range of intellectual and critical perspectives. With these efforts, BC became one of the first major universities in the United States to establish Black Studies as integral to its academic curriculum. In 1981, BC and the Black Studies Program took a major step forward by appointing Amanda V. Houston, a dynamic teacher and Boston community activist, as permanent part-time Director. Mrs. Houston laid the groundwork for the Black Studies minor, established in 1985, and–in large part–for the structure, goals, and mission of today’s program. While Mrs. Houston’s vision for a Black Studies major has not yet been realized, it is possible to develop and propose an Independent Major in African and African Diaspora Studies. The first independent AADS major graduated in 1990. In 1983, the Black Studies Program–in partnership with the Museum of Afro-American History and the Boston Public Schools–initiated the first in a successful series of “Blacks in Boston” conferences that examined the social, political, and cultural issues faced by the different ethnic groups and organizations that have made up Boston’s “Black” community. This and other outreach efforts helped develop closer connections between BC students and the wider Boston community. In 1993 Professor Frank Taylor, a tenured Associate Professor of Caribbean History, became the first full time faculty member to assume the position of Director of Black Studies; his directorship was defined by an expanded focus on the Caribbean. The 1996 “Blacks in Boston” Conference featured Boston’s Afro-Caribbean connections and, with Prof. Taylor’s encouragement, students and community members made greater use of the John J. Burns Library’s Caribbeana and Nicholas M. Williams Ethnological Collections on Caribbean politics and culture. Also in 1993, the University core requirements were revised to include one course designated “Cultural Diversity” for the entering class of 1997. Several Black Studies offerings fit easily under this rubric, thus Black Studies courses began to enroll an even broader range of BC students from all four undergraduate schools. In July 2005, Associate Professor of English Cynthia Young was hired as the new Director of Black Studies. Under Professor Young’s leadership, the Program grew to include faculty jointly appointed with the departments of English, History, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Theology; its network of affiliate faculty grew exponentially; and the minor’s curricular offerings were expanded to approximately 40 courses per year. In January 2006, the program was renamed the African and African Diaspora Studies Program (AADS) to reflect the minor’s broadened focus on Africa and its world-wide diaspora. Central to AADS’s renewed focus are the “New Directions in African Diaspora Studies Lecture Series,” highlighting new AADS research by national and international scholars and creative writers, and the “Works in Progress Lecture Series” that features presentations by BC scholars. In July of 2009, Rhonda Frederick (Associate Professor of English and AADS), became the Program’s fourth director. Professor Frederick is committed to initiatives begun by Professor Cynthia Young, Professor Frank Taylor, as well as Mrs. Amanda V. Houston, while forging new connections Boston’s African Diaspora communities, joining forces with New England area and international Africana Studies programs, and increasing AADS’s profile within BC academic and intellectual communities. Currently, AADS offers over 40 courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences, enrolling more than 1200 students each year. Its mission is to introduce histories, cultures, and experiences of African descended peoples to the widest range of students; to support serious academic research on Africa and the African Diaspora; to give African descended students and their peers opportunities to examine the depth and breadth of African legacies on this continent and in all parts of our world; to link local Black communities more closely with BC; and to project the significance of realities of people of African descent to the intellectual life of BC and larger communities.

African and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University

African and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University, (AADS) African and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University The African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS) program at Kennesaw State University offers students an interdisciplinary educational experience that fosters an understanding of the global experiences of African and African-descended peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. Students gain an appreciation of the diverse character of humanity, explore the complex historical and cultural relations between Africans on the continent and African-descended peoples in the Diaspora, and engage in a comparative study of issues affecting Africans in the continent and the Diasporas. "Diaspora" has come to mean the migration or dispersion of any group of people from their ancestral homelands � in this case, the African Diaspora in Asia, Europe, Oceania and the Americas. The global, interdisciplinary AADS major and minor provides students a valuable Liberal Arts education, professional and critical thinking skills, and tools for navigating our global world society.

African and Black Diaspora Global Network on HIV and AIDS

African and Black Diaspora Global Network on HIV and AIDS, African and Black Diaspora African and Black Diaspora Global Network on HIV and AIDS The mission of ABDGN is to strengthen the response to emerging HIV and AIDS epidemics among African/Black communities in the Diasporas (ABD). The governing council of the network has global representatives from organizations and networks located in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany. As a unified “network of networks” the ABDGN will facilitate knowledge translation, collaborations, capacity building and foster emerging partnerships needed to build effective responses to address the multiple impacts of HIV and AIDS on the lives of ABD.

African and Black Diaspora Studies at DePaul University

African and Black Diaspora Studies at DePaul University, African and Black Diaspora Studies, DePaul University, ABD African and Black Diaspora Studies at DePaul University African and Black Diaspora Studies (ABD) is an interdisciplinary program at DePaul that provides its students with an opportunity to study the diverse cultures and societies that make up the global African Diaspora. African and Black Diaspora Studies encourages its students to explore the Black experience from a variety of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives including but not limited to historical, artistic, sociological, anthropological, and philosophical approaches. Students may concentrate their study regionally (e.g. Africa, Black America, Afro-Caribbean and Latin America, etc.) or thematically (e.g. literature and culture, politics, gender and sexuality, etc.). ABD prepares its students to be socially-conscious global citizens prepared with the tools of analysis, oral and written communication, and cultural understanding needed to succeed in today's world. ​

African and Caribbean News Across Canada

African and Caribbean News Across Canada African and Caribbean News Across Canada Caribbean Union of Canada Inc. is a Federal Not for Profit Umbrella Organization designed to encompass a network of regional chapters that serve as systemic resources to enable Caribbean Entities and People to build and sustain community development. These Chapters are comprised of city organizations that act as infrastructures to support Caribbean communities all across the regions of Canada. Structurally, the Caribbean Union of Canada is comprised of Community Chapters branching outward to build multiple Organizations across Canada?s cities, creating resources in the designated city for Caribbean and African people. In the structure Caribbean Union of Canada and the National Chapters are network organization(s) for Caribbean Associations, Organizations, Institutions Foundations, Caribbean Businesses, and Caribbean People to create all kinds of transactions, culture, knowledge, history and financial gain under one umbrella thus therefore creating a Caribbean unified economic base. This Organization will create the unity we need, for us to move together forward into the future.

African and Diasporic Religious Studies Association

African and Diasporic Religious Studies Association, ADRSA African and Diasporic Religious Studies Association Founded in April 2012, the African and Diasporic Religious Studies Association is dedicated to supporting scholarship and building community. The need for such an organization became evident during a meeting of scholars of African and Diasporic Religions from Harvard University, Boston University, and Boston College at Harvard Divinity School's Center for the Study of World Religions held in October 2011. While there are Area Studies organizations, Religious Studies organizations and Anthropological organizations through which these scholars often network and present their work, all present agreed that an organization dedicated exclusively to the study of these traditions will provide scholars with the opportunity to network more closely with one another and to workshop and present their research in a more nuanced manner. Additionally, as Jacob Olupona and others have remarked, African and Diasporic Religions have historically been conspicuously absent from the discipline of Religious Studies and inter-religious dialogue. For this reason, although ADRSA is an interdisciplinary consortium, we advocate for the inclusion of these traditions in the Religious Studies dialogue and encourage their analysis using Religious Studies theories, methodologies and frameworks, where applicable. Finally, we aim to bring down the invisible curtain between scholars and communities by engaging with practitioners of these traditions not only as "informants" but as keepers of knowledge and partners in dialogue. To this end, we welcome scholar-practitioners as well as independent scholars from within communities of practice, and community members are always invited to attend our conferences. Mission The African & Diasporic Religious Studies Association (ADRSA) is dedicated to supporting scholarship in African and Diasporic Religions. ADRSA is committed to scholarly and community exchange with a particular focus on bringing underrepresented voices to the fore. Goals ADRSA aims to: Promote scholarly discourse on African and Diasporic Religions as practiced on the continent and throughout the Diaspora Encourage the presentation and publication of research on African and Diasporic Religions, particularly in the field of Religious Studies and other disciplines where it has been historically underrepresented Provide spaces in which professional bonds between scholars in varying disciplines and stages of research may commence and flourish Build and maintain connections between scholars of African and Diasporic Religions and communities of practice

African Angelz Network, Inc

African Angelz Network, Inc African Angelz Network, Inc African Angelz Network, Inc

African Arguments

African Arguments African Arguments Welcome to African Arguments, a comment and analysis site. We publish high quality analysis of African current affairs and politics from inside the continent and through our global network of writers. It is hosted by the Royal African Society and run in partnership with The World Peace Foundation, the International Africa Institute and ECA-CREAC (Expertise on Central Africa). FAQs Who funds African Arguments? African Arguments is supported as a core project of the RAS. However, it has also received a number of grants over the last 4 years +. These include the following: Open Society Initiative (Site overheads 2011 – 2104) Miles Morland Foundation (African Journalism Fund 2015) Humanity United (Making Sense of the Sudans 2014 – 15) United States Institute of Peace (Nigeria Forum 2014 – 15) Expertise on Central Africa (Central Africa Forum 2015) How can I write for African Arguments? Anyone can write for African Arguments. Our only requirement is that the work fulfills our high standards for publication. All submissions should be sent to the editor, James Wan: africanargumentseditor[@]gmail.com. Do you have guidelines for submissions? Yes, but these can be flexible. The most important thing is to communicate with the editor before submission. In general, the editor will advise that you do the following: Write something that is around 1,000 words and certainly no more than 1,500. Write in a ‘journalistic’, rather than ‘academic’ style. Avoid using jargon. Explain complicated concepts or references. Use hyperlinks (the editor can explain how to insert these) rather than footnotes if you want to reference. African Arguments reserves the right to refuse publication. Do you pay? Yes and no. African Arguments has a commissioning budget, but money is more readily available for those who write on specific countries/regions, or those who have a specific professional background. First, a central aim of African Arguments is to support high quality journalism, and professional writing more generally, from African countries. We do this through the African Journalism Fund (AJF), which is a ring-fenced part of our budget that can only be used to commission writers who both work in and are from an African country. Our commissioning rate is $250 per piece (around 1,000 words). We publish approximately 1 new AJF-funded piece per week. We run 3 country/region-specific projects with their own commissioning budget. These are The Nigeria Forum and Making Sense of the Sudans and The Central Africa Forum. All three projects publish approximately 1 commissioned piece per week ($250 for 1000 words). We have a small commissioning budget for freelance journalists. However, it is not sufficient to pay all freelancers who approach us with an idea. We don’t ask people to write for free (unless they offer), so only a small number of our articles are written by freelancers. In this case it is usually articles that, for whatever reason (usually length or subject matter) would not get published if we did not offer. Can I do an internship with African Arguments? We do not run an internship with African Arguments. You can however, apply for an internship with the Royal African Society and then state that you are interested in working on African Arguments (but you will participate in a range of RAS work; including events, communications and admin).

African Arguments

African Arguments African Arguments African Arguments is a pan-African platform for news analysis, comment and opinion. We seek to analyse issues facing the continent, investigate the stories that matter, and amplify a diversity of voices.

African Assistance Center (AAC)

African Assistance Center, AAC African Assistance Center (AAC) 1 - Background: AAC was started in 2000-2001. The purpose of this program is to have a place where Africans will be able to access information such as: health care, job search, job training, rules and regulations and education in the city of Lowell. It will also help the children whose parents are originally from Africa to understand their origin and also help them to maintain the culture of their origin. The program is designed to educate people in the community about drug use, drinking, smoking, STDs, violence and abuse that goes on in our society. It will educate the children in this community about self-esteem. 2 - The African immigrant community in Lowell has grown to more than 5000 people. We do believe that this community can make a difference in the City of Lowell by establishing a positive activity that will help our children to maintain their self-esteem and their origin. The program will provide a worthwhile behavior characteristics that would have a good impact in their physical, emotional, psychological and social activity. This program will help to build a strong relationship in the city of Lowell through interactions that increase the community's recognition of, and respect for, African community role models. 3 - Mission/Goals: - To help adults and children from this community to be active in the city of Lowell. Goals include: - To have a place where Africans can look for information. - To help African children improve their self-esteem and their self-image. - To decrease drug use, smoking, drinking, STDs, violence and abuse in the African community. 4 - Services: AAC intends to provide information and referral to existing services, including those related to housing, health and job training, available in the Lowell area.

African Association for Lexicography

African Association for Lexicography African Association for Lexicography All about: ALASA - African Language Association of Southern Africa ALASA SIG - ALASA Special Interest Group: Language and Speech Technology Development LSSA - Linguistic Society of Southern Africa SAALA - Southern African Applied Linguistics Association SAALT - South African Association for Language Teaching SATI - South African Translators' Institute

African Association of Madison, Wisconsin

African Association of Madison, Wisconsin African Association of Madison, Wisconsin The African Association of Madison serves as a forum to bring together people of African descent and friends of Africa in Madison and Wisconsin in general. The association shall provide services that will promote and encourage the collective cultural, social, educational and economic welfare of its membership and the community. It shall also safeguard the diverse African heritages and traditions inherent in the rich cultures of the continent, and serve as a medium to disseminate these heritages and traditions to the Wisconsin community. The association shall seek to promote developmental programs in Africa.

African Australian Association ACT

African Australian Association ACT African Australian Association ACT PROMOTING A POSITIVE IMAGE OF AFRICA AMONG THE GENERAL COMMUNITY IN AUSTRALIA The African Australian Association ACT aims to 1) promote a greater understanding of Africa, its cultures and heritage in the community; 2) to assist the integration of families and individuals into the community; and, 3) to participate actively in the development of a multicultural society in Australia. The Association runs several activities that aim to improve African participation in the general community. These include participation in the Multicultural Festival and annual Africa Day celebrations held in May.

African Australian Online Resource (AricanOz)

African Australian Online Resource, AricanOz African Australian Online Resource (AricanOz) African Australian Online Resource (AricanOz) ? African Australian ?portal? offering free African events listings, music, study, communities and other links and resources. Set up with the aim of improving community access to the web, showcasing African Australian arts and culture for everyone to enjoy, and raising the profile and understanding of Africa in Australia.Links, info on events, news, music, travel & more.

African Books Collective

African Books Collective African Books Collective 1 - Mission Statement: African Books Collective, founded, owned and governed by African publishers, seeks to strengthen indigenous African publishing through collective action and to increase the visibility and accessibility of the wealth of African scholhip and culture. 2 - Who we are: African Books Collective (ABC) is a non-profit Oxford-based, worldwide marketing and distribution outlet for 2,500 print titles from Africa, of which 800 are also ebooks - scholarly, literature and children's books. Founded, owned and governed by a group of African publishers, its participants are 149 independent and autonomous African publishers from 24 countries. 3 - History: A group of African publishers met in 1985 to address the constraints publishers were experiencing in financing, marketing and distributing their books, and the dearth of African published materials in the North. They founded ABC as a collective self-help initiative to strengthen the economic base of independent African publishers and to meet the needs of Northern libraries and other book buyers. With initial support from funding agencies, trading began in 1989. Whilst adapting to changing markets and methodologies, its founding ethos and aims remain unchanged.?

African Burial Ground

African Burial Ground, African Burial Ground National Monument African Burial Ground A Sacred Space in Manhattan From about the 1690s until 1794, both free and enslaved Africans were buried in a 6.6-acre burial ground in Lower Manhattan, outside the boundaries of the settlement of New Amsterdam, later known as New York. Lost to history due to landfill and development, the grounds were rediscovered in 1991 as a consequence of the planned construction of a Federal office building. New York's African Burial Ground is the nation's earliest known African and African American cemetery. An estimated 15,000 men, women and children were buried here between the late 1600s and the mid 1790s. More...

African Business and Kingdom Leadership Summit

African Business and Kingdom Leadership Summit African Business and Kingdom Leadership Summit This historic Summit, hosted by Archbishop Nicholas Duncan-Williams and his wife, Rosa Whitaker, two pioneering leaders in both ministry and the marketplace will convene the finest African and global leaders in business and ministry. They will connect and collaborate around strategies and solutions to deepen their personal and collective impact in ushering Africa into a new era of inclusive growth, global leadership, Christ-like compassion and sustainable security.

African Business Association

African Business Association African Business Association The African Business Association is a student-run organization of the George Washington University School of Business. We are dedicated to sharing information with the greater George Washington University community about the African business climate, exploring investment opportunities in Africa, and providing additional resources to African students and those with a general interest in Africa. We strive to connect thought leaders from around the world with the GWU School of Business community to share insights and perspectives about the opportunities in Africa. Our events are open to all members of the GWU community, professionals, academics and all those curious to learn more about Africa.?

African Business Club

African Business Club African Business Club The Africa Business Club of Columbia Business School is dedicated to increasing awareness of business opportunities on the African continent within the Columbia Business School community. Our activities are professional, educational and social in nature, and are open to all members and alumni of Columbia Business School.

African Business Club at Columbia Business School

African Business Club at Columbia Business School African Business Club at Columbia Business School The Africa Business Club of Columbia Business School is dedicated to increasing awareness of business opportunities on the African continent within the Columbia Business School community. Our activities are professional, educational and social in nature, and are open to all members and alumni of Columbia Business School.

African Canadian Disability Community Inc.

African Canadian Disability Community Inc. African Canadian Disability Community Inc. The purpose of the Association is (a) to identify solutions and opportunities that enable persons with disabilities to participate fully in Canadian life; (b) to provide education on the role of cultural diversity in developing opportunities for persons with disabilities, particularly persons with disabilities from ethno-racial backgrounds; and (c) to enhance the skills of persons with disabilities through training programs such as health education, computer literacy and job networking.

African Canadian Online

African Canadian Online African Canadian Online The Centre for the Study of Black Cultures in Canada welcomes you to African Canadian Online. Our site provides information on African Canadian artists and their work, links to other Canadian resources on the web, and updates about the activities of the Centre. This website began in 1996 as a course project by students at York University's Atkinson College, and was expanded by another class in the summer of 1998. We invite contributions and updates. Explore African Canadian Online! There are sections on film, theatre, music, literature, visual art, dance, culture, and links to other great sites.

African Canadian Services

African Canadian Services African Canadian Services The African Canadian Services Division is located within the Public Schools Branch of the Nova Scotia Department of Education. The African Canadian Services Division was established in February of 1996 to implement the Department's response to the BLAC Report on Education, Redressing Inequity Empowering Black Learners. The African Canadian Services Division was established in February of 1996 to implement the Department's response to the BLAC Report on Education, Redressing Inequity Empowering Black Learners. Major objectives: develop, promote and deliver programs, resources and services for African Nova Scotian students; encompass all levels of education; advise and guide other divisions of the Branch, and the Department ofEducation, regarding African Canadian Education; promote understanding of African Canadians and their history, heritage,culture, traditions and contributions to society recognizing their origin as Africans; ensure African Canadian students have greater access to post secondary institutions; work with staff in- Branch and across the department to address systemicracism and discrimination, by facilitating implementation of the Racial Equity Policy

African Capacity Building Foundation

African Capacity Building Foundation African Capacity Building Foundation Established in February 1991, ACBF is the outcome of collaboration between African governments and the international donor community. Its mission is to build sustainable human and institutional capacity for sustainable growth and poverty reduction in Africa. ACBF?s vision is for Africa to be recognized for its socio-political and economic capabilities and endowments ? a continent with effective institutions and policies acquired through sustained investment in people and institutions. The Foundation aims to become a leader, major partner, and centre of excellence for capacity building in Africa.

African Capacity Building Foundation

African Capacity Building Foundation, ACBF African Capacity Building Foundation Established in 1991, the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) builds human and institutional capacity for good governance and economic development in Africa. To date the Foundation has empowered governments, parliaments, civic society, private sector and higher education institutions in more than 45 countries and 6 regional economic communities. ACBF supports capacity development through investments, technical support, knowledge generation and sharing across Africa.

African Chamber of Commerce - Dallas Fort Worth

African Chamber of Commerce - Dallas Fort Worth African Chamber of Commerce - Dallas Fort Worth WHAT WE DO: The African Chamber of Commerce-DFW promotes trade, commerce, education, and cultural exchange between the United States and Nations of Africa in the Diaspora. OUR HISTORY: The African Chamber of Commerce-DFW was founded by a few Africans under the leadership of Dr. Obi Duruji. In 1998, Mr. Sanmi Akinmulero became the president and opened the Chamber to the public with it's membership subsequently growing to over 400 members; while still maintaining the core values of the Chamber. We endeavor to make a difference in the DFW Business Community, especially as it relates to building business relationships between the US and Africa, eventuating to make a difference in the communities they serve.

African Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest

African Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest African Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest 1 - The African Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest (ACCPNW) is a membership based, non-profit organization. The mission of ACCPNW is to promote an environment of direct trade and business prosperity between Africa and the Northwest United States. ACCPNW provides also free business seminars to local minority business owners. The training courses range from the process of starting and sustaining a business to the techniques of effective business development. 2 - ACCPNW was established in January of 1998 and held the First Annual Africa Day Business Forum during the World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Meeting in November of 1999. During the past ten years, ACCPNW has continued to establish itself as a focal resource for business partnerships between Africa and the Pacific Northwest. 3 - ACCPNW has partnerships with government trade related organizations and local non-profits as well as a strong network in the local business community. We are a resource for information on U.S. and African trade policy, and an advocate bringing attention to Africa?s increasing trade potential. The Chamber continues to work closely with Congressman Jim McDermott who is well-versed on African trade and the author of the African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA). 4 - The majority of our members are African immigrants who currently reside in the Pacific Northwest. We are working to build and strengthen business capacity for African Immigrants and Refugees residing in Washington State. Many are business owners who are interested in developing business opportunities with their homeland. We also have an active American membership that is interested in developing trade and investment opportunities in the many emerging markets across Africa. ACCPNW has a solid membership base and is continuing to expand. Become a member today!

African collections at the Stanford University Libraries

African collections at the Stanford University Libraries, African collections, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford University, Libraries African collections at the Stanford University Libraries The African collections at the Stanford University Libraries encompass publications, audio-visual materials, archives, manuscripts and electronic resources about and from Sub-Saharan Africa. It is one of the finest African studies collections in the world. Two of the many notable holdings at Stanford include African newspapers and the African map collection at the Earth Science Library.

African Communities Council of Australia (ACCA)

African Communities Council of Australia, ACCA African Communities Council of Australia (ACCA) African Communities Council of Australia (ACCA) Inc. in Western Australia,

African Communities Council of South Australia (ACCSA)

African Communities Council of South Australi, ACCSA African Communities Council of South Australia (ACCSA) African Communities Council of South Australia (ACCSA)

African Communities of Manitoba (ACOMI)

African Communities of Manitoba, ACOMI African Communities of Manitoba (ACOMI) The African Communities of Manitoba, Inc. (ACOMI) is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization which is not affiliated with any political party or religious organization. ACOMI aims at a vibrant, engaged and sustainable African Canadian presence across Manitoba, contributing to a culturally rich and economically prosperous, socially inclusive society. Vision: Our vision is a vibrant, engaged and sustainable African Canadian presence across Manitoba, contributing to a culturally rich and economically prosperous, socially inclusive society. Mission: To act as a charitable organization which carries out and promotes programs, projects and activities for the encouragement, support and advancement of the African community in Manitoba, including the preservation and promotion of its unique culture and human heritage.

African Communities of Manitoba Inc

African Communities of Manitoba Inc African Communities of Manitoba Inc The African Communities of Manitoba, Inc. (ACOMI) is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization which is not affiliated with any political party or religious organization. ACOMI aims at a vibrant, engaged and sustainable African Canadian presence across Manitoba, contributing to a culturally rich and economically prosperous, socially inclusive society. Motto: "Advancing Community Unity and Prosperity". Vision: Vision is a vibrant, engaged and sustainable African Canadian presence across Manitoba, contributing to a culturally rich and economically prosperous, socially inclusive society. Mission: To act as a charitable organization which carries out and promotes programs, projects and activities for the encouragement, support and advancement of the African community in Manitoba, including the preservation and promotion of its unique culture and human heritage. Aims & Objectives: 1) To establish and operate a resource centre to be used for the delivery of food and emergency supplies; literacy programs; employment training and mentoring; referral services; and counselling for the benefit of the community. 2) To advance education by providing secondary and post-secondary bursaries/scholarships to qualified low-income students of African heritage.

African Community Development Foundation (ACDF

African Community Development Foundation, ACDF African Community Development Foundation (ACDF The African Community Development Foundation (ACDF) exists to improve livelihoods by building capacity for self-reliance within African Communities. It was established in the UK in 1999 and is based in the UK and?Africa.

African Community International

African Community International African Community International The African Community International Inc., ?also called the African Center serves the needs of vulnerable and underserved African-born residents; providing diverse services and programs and offering charitable consulting services to the general population. The organization?s operational philosophy is based on support and empowerment with the belief that the end result will lead to a shared promise to work together for a dynamic vision of a community?s future and together to secure that future. You are encouraged to take a tour of this site in order to fully grasp the inherent benefits that African Center provides.

African Community of West Autralia

African Community of West Autralia African Community of West Autralia The African Community in Western Australia provides settlement support, advocacy, community information and education for new African migrants and assists in mediation and conflict resolution. The community also organises social and cultural activities.

African Community Resource Center

African Community Resource Center, ACRC African Community Resource Center Mission The mission of the African Community Resource Center (ACRC) is to assist low-income families and African immigrants, in accessing available resources and to build the capacity for socio-economic development and create a middle class in Africa Focus The African Community Resource Center (ACRC) fulfills its mission by offering a wide variety of social and cultural activities to its target population which includes families, local civic organizations, and businesses. ACRC offers classes, special events and seasonal activities for all ages. The programs hosted by ACRC will serve the African community in Virginia and the larger Washington Metropolis to provide various services with the intention of improving social mobility and thereby reducing poverty. Our year round programming will provide educational enrichment, technical awareness and training aimed at enhancing the well – being of our community’s youth. The programs provided will target at risk youth and offer them services to help develop their academic and social skills. Our goal for the programs targeted to chillden ages 8 to 18 with an objective to help build self – esteem, improve academic performance and encourage students to complete high school and pursue a higher education. Program topics for forums will include: Manhood/Womanhood, Dating and Relationships, Family Values, Self Esteem, Healthy Eating and Fitness, Financial Enrichment and Career Goals setting ACRC will work to create a greater awareness and participation in community activities. ACRC will also work to support outreach, marketing and community activities. ACRC will maintain fiscal integrity and expand community support by increasing business and neighborhood partnerships through obtaining sponsorships for ACRC’s programs and activities. Goal To administer the programs and facilities of the African Community Resource Center, and to assist low-income families and African immigrants by planning activities to provide information to them in order to facilitate their integration to reduce poverty and become more self-sufficient. Objectives Empower Africans with timely information to assist in making informed decisions. Offer an opportunity for the nurturing of budding entrepreneurs and innovative business ideas. Provide an avenue for continuous learning in technology skills acquisition especially for the youth. Create a platform for the youth to set clearer and achievable goals through mentoring, college preparation and counseling programs. Contribute to social mobility through assistance in accessing financial and economic opportunities. Advocating and researching on critical socio-economic issues affecting the community

African Cuisine Magazine

African Cuisine Magazine, ACM African Cuisine Magazine African Cuisine Magazine [ACM] is a platform for all aspects of African food and drink in the Diaspora. It’s not just about restaurants, beers and wines [of course those are important!]. ACM looks at the entire food chain, reporting on issues affecting African foods into the Diaspora, local issues in Africa affecting availability of foodstuff abroad and the perennial problem of export and import restrictions. We also share news and views on the enlarged experience in the Diaspora community by finding new angles to African food and drink and their enjoyment. As such, ACM is determined to raise the quality and quantity of debate on African cuisine in the Diaspora. Our Mission
: To lead the way in reporting on all aspects of African food and drink in the Diaspora.

African Cultural Alliance of North America Inc.

African Cultural Alliance of North America Inc. African Cultural Alliance of North America Inc. The African Cultural Alliance of North America Inc. (ACANA), is an agency founded on a mission to provide cultural sensitive social services, cultural programs, economic and workforce development programs, community engagement and development programs and other services targeting mainly African and Caribbean immigrants in the United States. Since ACANA'S founding in 1999 the agency has achieved all of the above mission statement. Today the agency provides varieties of services to over 4000 mainly African and Caribbean immigrants and other community residents annually. On behalf of the board of directors, executive officers, staffs, volunteers, and stake holders, we are honor and privileged to serve and assist our targeted population. Currently, the agency is now redesigning a strategic plan to expand its services. WELCOME TO ACANA, "We served with respect, dignity and pride". The African Cultural Alliance of North America (ACANA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works to help immigrants, refugees, and asylees in their adjustment and resettlement process in the United States. ACANA was founded in', 'acana, african, refugees, community, organization, asylees, communities, united, services, immigrant, immigrants, services, cultural, including, youth

African Cultural Association

African Cultural Association African Cultural Association The African Cultural Association is a registered charity committed to helping people of African origin as well as the wider community across London. he African Cultural Association was founded in 1984 and registered as a charity with the Charity Commission in June 1995 to provide general advice and information in the areas of social welfare and education to people experiencing hardship in the London region. The Association promotes awareness of the different cultures in multicultural Britain through encouraging service users to come together to share experiences and provide a support network for themselves within the community. We provide guidance, training and support to the vulnerable, unskilled, unemployed and lone parents. We organise women’s groups and youth-centred activities on a regular basis and prominent black festivals and events (e.g. Black History Month). The African Cultural Association is also committed to working with elderly people over the age of 65.

African Cultural Exchange

African Cultural Exchange African Cultural Exchange The African Cultural Exchange at Fordham University serves as a resource for African Students during their first year transition to Fordham, throughout their academic tenure, and beyond. The club also serves the same purpose for African and African American studies students and researchers by educating Fordham students about issues pertaining to African history, culture, and current events.

AFRICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE

AFRICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE AFRICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE AFRICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE is an Association for promoting understanding between peoples of Kenya in Germany..

African Development Association for Progress (ADAP)

African Development Association for Progress, ADAP African Development Association for Progress (ADAP) The African Development Association for Progress (ADAP) is a recognised UK charitable body founded in 2007 with the aim of enhancing the development of people of African Descent.The ability of volunteers to work willingly together for the betterment of themselves, and their community is invaluable to ADAPs core aims and objectives. Mission: ADAP's aim is to create greater networks, growth and sustainability amongst people of African descent, who are willing to contribute their much needed skills, experience and resources through volunteering in various projects and programmes run in the UK and Africa.

African Development Bank

African Development Bank African Development Bank The African Development Bank (AfDB) Group?s mission is to help reduce poverty, improve living conditions for Africans and mobilize resources for the continent?s economic and social development. With this objective in mind, the institution aims at assisting African countries ? individually and collectively - in their efforts to achieve sustainable economic development and social progress.

African Development Bank Group

African Development Bank Group African Development Bank Group The African Development Bank Group – Fast Facts Founded 1964 Constituent Institutions The African Development Bank (ADB) The African Development Fund (ADF) The Nigeria Trust Fund (NTF) Shareholders 54 African countries (regional member countries) 27 non-African countries (non-regional member countries) Mission To promote sustainable economic growth and reduce poverty in Africa. Authorized Capital at December 31, 2013 UA 66.98 billion Subscribed Capital at December 31, 2013 UA 65.21 billion Paid-up Capital at December 31, 2013 UA 4.96 billion Callable capital as of December 31, 2013 (ADB) UA 60.25 billion Total reserves as of December 31, 2013 (ADB) UA 2.86 billion Approved Operations, 2013 317 operations totalling UA 4.39 billion, financed as follows: ADB: UA 1.83 billion ADF: UA 2.27 billion NTF: UA 31.2 million Special Funds: UA 253.4 million Of which: Loans: UA 2.86 billion (93 operations) Grants: UA 697.0 million (114 operations) HIPC: UA 22.3 million (2 operations) Equity Participations: UA 99.5 million (10 operations) Guarantees: UA 431.7 million (6 operations) Loan Reallocation: UA 17.8 million (1 operation) Special Funds: UA 253.4 million (91 operations) Sector Approvals, 2013 Infrastructure: UA 2.05 billion (57.6 percent of total loans and grants) Social: UA 334.8 million (9.4 percent) Multisector: UA 449.2 million (12.6 percent ) Finance: UA 288.0 million (8.1 percent) Agriculture and Rural Development: UA 428.7 million (12.0 percent) Environment: UA 9.2 million (0.3 percent) Urban development: UA 0.3 million (0.01 percent) Total Cumulative Loan and Grant Approvals, 1967–2013 4,003 loans and grants totalling UA 67.22 billion

African Development Center

African Development Center African Development Center 1 - Mission: The Mission of the African Development Center is to grow businesses, build wealth, and increase reinvestment in the African communities of Minnesota. 2 - Our Work: Through workshops and consultations on financial literacy, business development, and home ownership, ADC provides culturally competent services to Minnesota?s African community. ADC is a leader in micro-lending to small businesses, outperforming even the largest banking institutions in the state of Minnesota. For three years now, ADC has been recognized as the number One small business lender of the City of Minneapolis. With the help of 8 dedicated full-time employees, Executive and Finance Committee and Board of Trustees, ADC provides services in 6 languages to communities throughout Minnesota. ADC is dedicated to the economic empowerment and success of African immigrants. Minnesota is home to over one-hundred thousand African immigrants, many of whom face language, cultural, and religious barriers. ADC actively works to reduce these barriers and create a path for African immigrants to achieve financial success.

African Development Center in Minneapolis, MN

African Development Center in Minneapolis African Development Center in Minneapolis, MN The Mission of the African Development Center is to grow businesses, build wealth, and increase reinvestment in the African communities of Minnesota. Our Work: Through workshops and consultations on financial literacy, business development, and home ownership, ADC provides culturally competent services to Minnesota?s African community. ADC is a leader in micro-lending to small businesses, outperforming even the largest banking institutions in the state of Minnesota. For three years now, ADC has been recognized as the number One small business lender of the City of Minneapolis. With the help of 8 dedicated full-time employees, Executive and Finance Committee and Board of Trustees, ADC provides services in 6 languages to communities throughout Minnesota. ADC is dedicated to the economic empowerment and success of African immigrants. Minnesota is home to over one-hundred thousand African immigrants, many of whom face language, cultural, and religious barriers. ADC actively works to reduce these barriers and create a path for African immigrants to achieve financial success.

African Development Foundation

African Development Foundation African Development Foundation USADF supports African-led development that grows community enterprises by providing seed capital and technical support. This empowers those who are least served by existing markets or assistance programs to become a part of Africa?s growth story. 1. How Does USADF Work? "connecting community enterprises with capital and technical support?. - Building a network of African expert support providers. - Identifying community enterprises with potential. - Providing an integrated package of support. -Managing for results. 2. Background: The African Development Foundation Act of 1980 established a new agency with a unique mission to by-pass layers of government inefficiencies by working directly with the most needy communities in Africa. USADF programs respond to local project requests by actively engage the local community group or enterprise in the design and implementation of the projects. This ensures that outcomes will best address the real community needs. 3. Why USADF? USADF?s unique mission is captured in its core operating principles: (1) Focus program activities on marginalized communities in Africa. (2) Invest in Africans and their ideas through participatory development. (3) Ensure projects produce long term social and economic results. (4) Promote African led and managed field project support. (5) Achieve the highest levels of openness and transparency. (6) Support and develop an equal oppurtunity, results driven staff that rewards hard work, dedication to the mission, and personal success. (7) Model high effectiveness and low overhead operations.

African Diaspora

African Diaspora African Diaspora African Diasporas Platform: Helping Africa and the Black Diaspora to Find and Engage with Each Other and with Opportunities Anywhere ... https://www.diasporaengager.com/Africa

African Diaspora

African Diaspora African Diaspora By the 1500s, thousands of Africans had been brought to the New World through slave trade. Captured from their homelands and separated from their communities and families, the Africans were sent to the Americas to work on the plantations or in ... African Diaspora: Selected full-text books and articles

African Diaspora

African Diaspora African Diaspora Web space for our online classroom

African diaspora - Identity, roots the Caribbean Black

African diaspora, The African diaspora, Identity, roots Identity, Caribbean, Black political movements African diaspora - Identity, roots the Caribbean Black Everything about: Identity and roots Identity in the Caribbean Black political movements Reparations This website was created as a further development of a major exhibition examining Bristol’s role in the transatlantic slave trade was held at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery in 1999 and is being maintained for archival purposes. A Respectable Trade? Bristol & Transatlantic Slavery proved to be of one of the most visited exhibits in the history of the museum as it provided the first chance to find out about the slave trade through a major exhibition. This website aims to provide access for more people to see the material available. Material from the Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, Bristol Record Office, Bristol Central Library, the University of Bristol Library and the Society of Merchant Venturers, which was collected together for the exhibition, was photographed for this site. Additional research was carried out at the former British Empire & Commonwealth Museum, John Wesley’s chapel and the John Judkyn Memorial Museum in order to add new items to the site. The dictionary definition of the word diaspora is disperse, sow, scatter. The word comes from the Greek, for ‘scatter through’ and is used to describe the dispersion of people from their homeland. It is usually used to mean a forced dispersion of a religious or ethnic group, but it can refer to the situation of any group dispersed, forcibly or voluntarily, throughout the world. Over several centuries, from the 7th to the 20th, millions of Africans were forced from their homes by the slave trade. It is estimated that between 9 and 11 million people were taken from Africa in the transatlantic slave trade and landed alive in the Caribbean and the Americas. Between one and two million more probably died crossing the Atlantic Ocean. It is thought that about the same number were sold into the northern and ‘oriental’ slave trade, which took black Africans to North Africa, Europe, India and the Arab world. This great forced relocation of people does not fit exactly the definition of a diaspora. The Africans enslaved over the years were not from one religious or ethnic group. They came from different ethnic groups, with different cultures and beliefs. But the word can be used for the African diaspora in its widest sense of dispersal and remembered cultural heritage. The millions of enslaved Africans were dispersed to many different countries, from Brazil to India. But many remembered their past, and kept it alive through religion, storytelling, music, customs and names. Checkout: Slavery Routes http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/routes/ The People Involved http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/people-involved/ Against Slavery http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/against-slavery/ After Slavery http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/after-slavery/ The Three Legs of the Slavery Voyage http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/map/ Learning Journeys http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/map/

African Diaspora - Slave Trade

African Diaspora - Slave Trade, African Diapsora, Slave Trade African Diaspora - Slave Trade Today's African Diaspora is a mixture of willing and unwilling migration from the African continent. What is the African Diaspora? The dispersion of Africans during and after the trans-Atlantic slave trade and others enroute to India as slaves and source of labor. People of African descent with their own communities outside the African continent are also referred to as being part of the Diaspora. This includes, brothers and sisters now in The Americas(new world), Europe, India and Australia. The Origin The dispersion and spreading of African people originally belonging to one nation and having a common culture. From the word "diaspeirein" Latin for disperse, From the word "Dia - + speirein" Greek for scatter or sow and from the word "spora" Greek for sowing or reproduction and spreading

African Diaspora Adopted and Fostered Adults (AFAAD)

African Diaspora Adopted and Fostered Adults, AFAAD African Diaspora Adopted and Fostered Adults (AFAAD) AFAAD connects, supports, and advocates for the needs of the African diasporic adoption and foster care community on a global level through community outreach and education, legislative advocacy, research, and social gatherings. afaad_sm Founded in 2006, AFAAD is the first international nonprofit organization of its kind that brings together adult adoptees and fosters care alums from across the global African diaspora. Who is AFAAD? AFAAD is one of the first adoptee led organizations specifically for adoptees and foster alums of African descent. We are from extraordinarily diverse backgrounds. As adult Black adoptees, we are domestic adoptees, we are transracial and international, we are those who survived foster care systems across the world, we are those adopted and raised by members of our own families. We are adopted to London from the U.S., to Sweden from Ghana, we are mixed Korean and Black, Caribbean, Afro-Latino, we are adopted to isolation and to diverse cities across the U.S., we are international and multilingual. We are multi-cultural, multi-racial – we are the diaspora. AFAAD believes providing connections for and creating space to make visible the adoption and foster community in Black/ African diasporic cultures worldwide will give support to those who otherwise remain isolated in their experiences. As adoptees and fosters ourselves, we believe coming together, even simply to hear one another’s stories and experiences, is a powerful tool for those of us who have for so long felt we are alone. One of AFAAD objectives is to ensure that conversations around adoption, in both academia and in popular culture, progress in a way that include contributions by adult adoptees. We support those who are conducting cutting-edge research, restructuring child welfare laws and policies, and creating new artwork, performance and films that reflect our unique experiences and perspectives. We place race, culture and connection at the forefront of our stories. We are committed to voicing a powerful message about kinship, family, race, survival, and global black identities. Adopted and Fostered Adults of the African Diaspora (AFAAD): Amazing group of Teens AFAAD members worked with Summer 08 Amazing group of Teens AFAAD members worked with Summer 08 is a social and political network for adopted and fostered adults to network and create lasting friendships, heal, and celebrate through local and international gatherings, is a network for adoptee activists, policy/advocacy work and research who are interested in legislative advocacy, provides consultation and resources to adoption agencies, social work organizations, policy workers, and media provides updated information on upcoming adoptee-related and other related African Diasporic community events, provides youth mentorship programs and activities for African Diasporic adopted and fostered youth, provides resources to surrounding communities interested in learning about the experiences and research of cross-cultural, international, inter-racial adoption, contributes critical and groundbreaking interventions in African Diasporic scholarship, an international professionals network for adoptees and foster alums between multiple African Diasporic sites.

African Diaspora Ancestral Commemoration Institute (ADACI)

African Diaspora Ancestral Commemoration Institute, ADACI African Diaspora Ancestral Commemoration Institute (ADACI) The African Diaspora Ancestral Commemoration Institute (ADACI) is dedicated to institutionalizing the commemoration of the millions of Africans lost during the Atlantic and other periods of enslavement. A winner of the 2004 Community Service Award of the Millennium Club of the National Association of Negro Business & Professional Women’s Clubs, Inc. (NANBPWC, Inc.), ADACI has provided outstanding educational and community-based programming in Metropolitan Washington, D.C. and the surrounding areas for nearly 20 years.

African Diaspora and the Atlantic World Research Circle

African Diaspora and the Atlantic World Research Circle African Diaspora and the Atlantic World Research Circle The African Diaspora and the Atlantic World Research Circle was originally funded as the African Diaspora Cluster. It explores the dispersion of African peoples from their original homelands, not only within the continent of Africa, but also worldwide — to places such as the United States, Europe, the Caribbean and South America. In the past, African Diaspora research emphasized mainly the study of Africans who dispersed from the continent, and very rarely looked at dispersal within the continent. This cluster bridges these two categories to provide a global context to the study of African peoples. It looks at different historical waves of dispersals and studies their catalytic factors and directions of movement. It explores how the connections between the African and African diasporic communities reflect the dynamics of their forced or voluntary migration; their interactions and relations with other societies and/or among each other; and the adaptation, reproduction and transformation of African cultural, social institutions and expressive forms. This interdisciplinary approach to studying the global African world is a logical extension of UW-Madison’s strong African-American Studies Department, African Languages and Literature Department, and African Studies Program, as well as a host of other international and cultural study programs. The cluster’s wide-ranging areas of study include geography, history, literature, medicine, art, music, dance, education, political science and sociology.

African Diaspora Archaeology Network

African Diaspora Archaeology Network African Diaspora Archaeology Network The ADAN provides a focal point for archaeological and interdisciplinary studies of African diasporas, with news, current research, information and links to other web resources related to the archaeology and history of descendants of African peoples. Through this engagement with African diasporas, the ADAN seeks to connect an intellectual community that considers the historical processes of culture, economics, gender, power, and racialization operating within and upon African descendant communities.

African Diaspora Archaeology Network (ADAN)

African Diaspora Archaeology Network, ADAN African Diaspora Archaeology Network (ADAN) The ADAN provides a focal point for archaeological and interdisciplinary studies of African diasporas, with news, current research, information and links to other web resources related to the archaeology and history of descendants of African peoples. Through this engagement with African diasporas, the ADAN seeks to connect an intellectual community that considers the historical processes of culture, economics, gender, power, and racialization operating within and upon African descendant communities. We publish a quarterly online Newsletter, with essays, analysis papers, project reports, announcements, book reviews, and news updates, that serve a readership of several thousand stakeholders, researchers, and educators across the globe. You can navigate within this web site by clicking on the subjects on the world map displayed at the top of each menu page. ADAN members also serve on the editorial board of the peer reviewed Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage.

African Diaspora Association of Canada

African Diaspora Association of Canada African Diaspora Association of Canada Mission: To provide a forum for Canadians of African Caribbean descent to build a network of action-oriented individuals and groups in support of our communities in Africa, the Caribbean and Canada. Mandate: To foster value-adding contributions to Canadian society, and to form sustainable partnerships that directly benefit deserving African communities in Africa, the Caribbean and Canada.

African Diaspora Association Of The Maritimes

African Diaspora Association Of The Maritimes African Diaspora Association Of The Maritimes The African Diaspora Association of the Maritimes (ADAM) is a non-profit, community-based organization dedicated to providing various services to assist Africans in the Maritimes. Members consist of individuals of African descent, non-African spouses of Africans, as well as individuals who share the mission, vision, and objectives of ADAM. Mission: The mission of ADAM is to encourage and foster successful participation and integration of members of the African Canadian Diaspora in educational, social, political, civic, and economic activities in Nova Scotia and in the Maritimes. ADAM is a welcoming and integrating organization, and will strive to provide the tangible and intangible infrastructures that are needed to resettle and motivate new immigrants of African descent to stay in Nova Scotia. Vision: ADAM envisions a society in which all individuals, including those of African descent, have equitable opportunities to realize their full potentials, and to participate meaningfully in the building of the Maritime Provinces. Purpose: ADAM’s purpose is to provide services to its members, network with all levels of government and with other public and private organizations for the benefit of its members and the community at large.

African Diaspora at the University of Milwaukee Wisconsin

African Diaspora, African Diaspora - University of Milwaukee Wisconsin African Diaspora at the University of Milwaukee Wisconsin The African Diaspora Project is a program that fosters global education and emphasizes the uniqueness of African culture and heritage. The purpose is to critically examine a range of concepts, issues and events that structure the reality of people of African descent. The program takes a look into the origin and evolution of African people as a way to detect the greatness, hardship and struggle of their contribution to modern societies and future generations. It aims to broaden students’ knowledge and understanding of world history, world politics and world oppression in order to expand their potential and willingness to prepare to be future leaders. The program emphasizes the study of indigenous civilizations, philosophies and ritual practices. Participants will be required to read African literature and select text books. The program will use the African Union models and other models to teach students cooperation, unity, responsibility and self determination as a bridge to cultural awareness. The objective is to build leadership skills, critical thinking skills and cultural competence in order for participants to respond academically, culturally, socially and emotionally. The program components include: African and African American History Leadership Development Communication Skill Building Life Skills (Program Solving, Identity, Prioritizing, Negotiation)

African Diaspora Awards

African Diaspora Awards, ADA African Diaspora Awards Over the past ten years, Applause Africa has committed time, energy and resources to identify and celebrate Africans in the Diaspora who have made a significant difference in African communities and sectors around the world. Applause Africa’s success and committed track record is a testament of our quest to highlight the efforts of deserving role models in the African community and serves as the passion behind the birth of the African Diaspora Awards. The African Diaspora Awards joins the list of projects and programs created by Applause Africa which seek to empower Africans in the Diaspora and render positive messages that empowers them and their community. The African Diaspora Award will prove to be as competitive as the Applause Africa Magazine which is reputed as Africa’s most respected leadership platform.The African Diaspora Awards is a special initiative that aims to celebrate exemplary individuals who have made a significant difference in the African community in the United States. The African Diaspora Awards aims to identify and celebrate notable Africans that have genuinely excelled in various spheres of life, as well as individuals in society who have contributed to the advancement of Africans in the Diaspora and Africa as a whole. As a new breed of African leaders now seek closer ties with the Diaspora, fully aware of the need to build lasting partnerships between the African Diaspora and the African continent through sustained dialogue and resilient collaboration with the governments and peoples of different regions of the world, home to the African Diaspora; Applause Africa is strategically positioned to empower the Diaspora to effectively engage in the conversation. //////////////////////////// Nominations for the African Diaspora Awards. JUDGING CRITERIA 1. The applicant demonstrates that s/he has directly and individually fueled the success of his/her work. African Diaspora Award winners are program founders and/or leading activist/advocates. Their involvement and leadership are integral to the success of their program or cause.2. The applicant has created great awareness about his/her brand. S/he exhibit excellent communication and creative skills, which they use to motivate and mobilize community members, promote their brand, and develop relationships with media, government, other not-for-profits, individuals, and funders.3. The applicant is confident and enthusiastic about being a leader. African Diaspora Award winners aren't reluctant heroes. They are confident, honest, and passionate leaders who take on challenges for the greater good.

African Diaspora Biography on the Internet

African Diaspora Biography on the Internet African Diaspora Biography on the Internet African Diaspora Biography on the Internet is ...

African Diaspora Chamber of Commerce (ADCC)

African Diaspora Chamber of Commerce, ADCC, Chamber of Commerce African Diaspora Chamber of Commerce (ADCC) The African Diaspora Chamber of Commerce (ADCC), established in 2012, a nonprofit organization at the forefront of strengthening and facilitating the commercial relationship between the African Diaspora and the continent of Africa. As a new organization we are committed to make an impact on the African people throughout the globe. As we forge Africa as the next Economic Frontier. ADCC works closely with governments, multilateral groups and private enterprises to improve Africa's trade and investment climate. The African Diaspora knows: private enterprise, investment capital, technology transfer and management. ADCC platform is designed to bring together potential business partners and increase Africa's investment profile in the world by developing critical contacts and business relationships among the African Diaspora while providing real opportunities for the exchange of information and ideas as we unity as an African people.

African Diaspora Club of Towson University

African Diaspora Club of Towson University African Diaspora Club of Towson University 1 - Mission: The mission of the African Diaspora Club (ADC) at Towson University is to celebrate and positively portray diverse cultures of Africa, by encouraging and supporting academic excellence, building community, promoting networks, being engaged as global citizens and fostering life-long ties to continent. By doing this we are fostering growth, encouraging development and changing our continent one student at a time, one country at a time. 2 - Vision: Our Vision is to help to create a community both here and abroad, in which all African ethnic groups, who are members of the Diaspora experience peace, love, stability and human rights. These conditions we believe are bridges to true liberation.

AFRICAN DIASPORA COUNCIL OF SWITZERLAND

AFRICAN DIASPORA COUNCIL OF SWITZERLAND AFRICAN DIASPORA COUNCIL OF SWITZERLAND Latest statistics show that over 100‘000 Africans and people of African origin live or work in Switzerland. This huge population is scattered all over the 26 cantons of the Swiss Confederation, mostly in major cities like Zurich, Geneva, Lausanne, Basel, Berne, Biel, etc. The African population of Switzerland is composed mostly of legal residents who ply their businesses in various fields of the Swiss economy. We have legal practitioners, professional fellows in Swiss Univerties, Financial institutions, Medical and pharmaceutical institutions, informatic and communication firms, sports, science and technological institutions and factories and of course many in diplomatic circles and international organisations mostly in Geneva area and in Berne. There are also African refugees and Asylum seekers. The African community has been organized largely on regional basis. Some associations that are active on the national level only regroup nationals of particular African nations. Others regroup members of the community with similar interests. Today, the African diaspora of Switzerland has the historic opportunity to establish a national platform that unites all interests with the possibility to speak with one voice on the national swiss scene. The Swiss federal office of migrations has shown sincere interest to address the impediments of integration of Africans in Switzerland. It therefore calls for an African national platform as serious partner in the process. This is why the African Diaspora Council Switzerland (ADCS) is founded in November 6, 2010 after extensive contacts, consultations, exchanges and deliberations since at least June 2010. The ADCS proposes to be a Federation of the African Diaspora in Switzerland. ADCS is a member of Forum for the integration of migrants, FIMM Suisse. Our mission then is to create a national platform for all Africans living in Switzerland irrespective of our diversity in order to have a strong voice in the Swiss national events and politics. We believe in unity in diversity. We intend to showcase the real face of Africans in Switzerland with their immense contributions to the Swiss real sectors. In order to guarantee efficiency and active participation of our members, we are organized in commissions and our members must be a member of at least one commission which include: Law & Politics, Information & Communication, Education & Health, Empowerment & Capacity building, Mediation & Conflict Resolution, Culture & Sport, and Finance & Fund raising. Our aims are thus: Creation of network of Africans, African associations, African business outlets, churches and mosques, African embassies as well as other migrant and Swiss associations pursuing African interests. Creation of network for the distribution of information in the African community of Switzerland and promotion of integration of Africans in Switzerland. Creation of a political Lobbying Front for the African Diaspora in Switzerland. Initiation of public campaigns for the promotion of the image of Black people in Switzerland. Capacity building for Africans in Switzerland. Guarantee a steady media presence for the African community of Switzerland. Conflict resolution among Africans in Switzerland as well as between Africans and Swiss authorities and other offices.

African Diaspora Council Switzerland (ADCS)

African Diaspora Council Switzerland, African Diaspora in Switzerland, ADCS African Diaspora Council Switzerland (ADCS) The ADCS proposes to be a Federation of the African Diaspora in Switzerland. ADCS is a member of Forum for the integration of migrants, FIMM Suisse. Our mission then is to create a national platform for all Africans living in Switzerland irrespective of our diversity in order to have a strong voice in the Swiss national events and politics. We believe in unity in diversity. We intend to showcase the real face of Africans in Switzerland with their immense contributions to the Swiss real sectors. In order to guarantee efficiency and active participation of our members, we are organized in commissions and our members must be a member of at least one commission which include: Law & Politics, Information & Communication, Education & Health, Empowerment & Capacity building, Mediation & Conflict Resolution, Culture & Sport, and Finance & Fund raising. Our aims are thus: Creation of network of Africans, African associations, African business outlets, churches and mosques, African embassies as well as other migrant and Swiss associations pursuing African interests. Creation of network for the distribution of information in the African community of Switzerland and promotion of integration of Africans in Switzerland. Creation of a political Lobbying Front for the African Diaspora in Switzerland. Initiation of public campaigns for the promotion of the image of Black people in Switzerland. Capacity building for Africans in Switzerland. Guarantee a steady media presence for the African community of Switzerland. Conflict resolution among Africans in Switzerland as well as between Africans and Swiss authorities and other offices.

African Diaspora Cultures

African Diaspora Cultures African Diaspora Cultures Oldways guides people to good health through heritage, using practical and positive programs grounded in science tradition and real foods. Let the old ways be your guide to good health.

African Diaspora Explorers Club

African Diaspora Explorers Club African Diaspora Explorers Club Are you interested in the rich history, culture, and art of the African Diaspora? Then this group is for you! This group will explore the rich contributions of people of African descent throughout the world. We will enhance our knowledge through art exhibits, books, movies, lectures, social gatherings, concerts and travel.

African Diaspora for Change

African Diaspora for Change African Diaspora for Change MISSION: The mission of African Diaspora for Change (ADC) is to educate and empower the African immigrant and broader African Diaspora community through culture, dialogue and advocacy. VISION: The vision of the organization is to dispel the negative images of African descendants and foster true change in the perception and policy toward Africa?s people. ADC will become the premier organization for the African Diaspora and provide members with access to a robust online community, cutting-edge use of technology, and local resources and programs.

African Diaspora Forum

African Diaspora Forum African Diaspora Forum African Diaspora Forum A federation of African migrants associations in South Africa. Mission To build an integrated society, free of xenophobia. To facilitate relationships between all Africans living in South Africa: living together! To consolidate a shared feeling of belonging in Africa Strategies To work locally, with communities. To promote dialogue and peace. To enhance culture as a starting point for exchange. To encourage joint initiatives. WHAT DOES "DIASPORA" MEAN? The word has several definitions, this is the definition extracted from the Merriam-Websters on line dictonary: (a): the movement, migration, or scattering of a people away from an established or ancestral homeland (b): people settled far from their ancestral homelands (c): the place where these people live Derivation:- Greek - Greek, dispersion, from diaspeirein to scatter, from dia- + speirein to sow Diaspora” is understood in our organisation as a group of persons living outside of their country of origin, but keeping and building strong links with each other. The term was chosen because it conveys both the idea of mobility and of networking. OUR HISTORY The African Diaspora Forum was created in immediate reaction to the xenophobic attacks rising in May 2008. Several community leaders and concerned residents in South Africa, called by Ivorian community leader Marc Gbaffou and Carnival organiser and pan african enthusiast Rayban Sengwayo, came together and decided to create a platform for African migrants to voice their concern and work for an integrated society. OUR MEMBERSHIP The African Diaspora Forum is a non profit organisation open to all willing individuals and organisations sharing the objectives of the Forum. Its originality consists in the union of a number of organisations representing African migrant communities living in South Africa. So far 21 African countries are represented in the Forum: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo-Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Malawi, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. OUR OBJECTIVES To work for an integrated society that is free of xenophobia and all other kinds of discrimination To promote and consolidate a Pan African forum for African residents of whatever nationality to work together to build one common voice on common issues, and a shared feeling of belonging to Africa To facilitate and develop relationships, exchanges and mutual understanding between South Africans and non South African residents in South Africa (in particular, but not exclusively, through the organisation of pan African cultural events; through the participation in civil society organisations at the local level – such as community policing forums, civics, street committees, etc.) To make sure that xenophobic statements in public discourses and policies do not remain unchallenged; and to work with South African institutions (at the national, provincial and local level) to promote integration between all African communities and to dismiss those discriminatory policies that fuel xenophobia. OUR STRENGTHS Consisting of representatives (group or individuals) of various African communities, the Forum has specific language and cultural skills that can be used to facilitate communication as well as to organise cultural events. The forum can rely on extended networks of migrants within South African society and mobilise them for specific reasons (support to persons affected by xenophobia, organisation of pan African events of cultural or political nature, etc.). The forum has important organisation skills as many of its members are currently community leaders. The forum is open to anyone sharing the objectives mentioned above, but its specificity is its inclusion of various African communities; and its knowledge of the issues and challenges experienced at the grassroots level.

African Diaspora Foundation

African Diaspora Foundation African Diaspora Foundation Mission: The African Diaspora Foundation is dedicated to developing peace centers, peace curricula, teachers, and to supporting outreach programs that promote peace, nonviolence and reconciliation in Africa and other parts of the world. Ultimately we strive to empower individuals to have a choice to choose peace instead of violence to build stable communities and progressive nations. Vision: The African Diaspora Foundation (ADF) is committed to developing a coalition of national and international leaders and organizations to address critical issues concerning peace, nonviolence, and reconciliation in Africa. As a non-profit organization, ADF has proposed in partnership with United States universities, to develop peace education centers in Los Angeles and in Africa offering a curriculum aimed at overcoming issues that threaten survival in countries affected by conflict. ADF's plan is that this model program will become an international force in preparing educators for the key task of making peace, nonviolence and reconciliation a working reality.

African Diaspora in Europe

African Diaspora in Europe African Diaspora in Europe The African Diaspora in Europe Historical Overview The history of the African Diaspora in Europe is still largely misunderstood and has not received much recent academic attention. It originated tens of thousands of years ago when human society, in the modern sense, first came into being. During this time, several waves of men and women from the African continent had begun to migrate to Europe. There is sufficient evidence of the existence of African descendants during the times of the ancient Greeks and Romans due to trade and exploration. As infrastructure grew and means of transportation improved, the dispersal of African people continued to increase throughout Europe. Not only were Africans entering Europe, but Europeans were developing ways of traveling deeper into Africa. As Europeans began to trade with local tribe leaders and merchants within Africa, the forced displacement of the African community increased with the sale of members from these African communities. Colonization spread throughout Africa with several European countries claiming land with valuable resources. Today more Africans and African descendants are integrated into European society, but problems continue to exist within different areas of society. Many of these problems differ depending on which culture or country the Africans and African descendants are located. This will be looked at more in depth in regard to Germany, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, and Portugal.

African Diaspora in Latin America - LANIC

African Diaspora in Latin America, LANIC, Latin American Network Information Center, LANIC African Diaspora in Latin America - LANIC The Latin American Network Information Center (LANIC) is part of the Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) and the Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas at Austin. Since 2011, LANIC has also been a part of the University of Texas Libraries as one of the initiatives that is under the LLILAS Benson Collaboration. LANIC's mission is to facilitate access to Internet-based information to, from, or on Latin America. Our target audience includes people living in Latin America, as well as those around the world who have an interest in this region. While many of our resources are designed to facilitate research and academic endeavors, our site has also become an important gateway to Latin America for primary and secondary school teachers and students, private and public sector professionals, and just about anyone looking for information about this important region. LANIC's editorially reviewed directories contain over 10,000 unique URLs, one of the largest guides for Latin American content on the Internet, and according to research conducted in April 2010, there are over 113,000 inbound links to pages on LANIC from Web Sites around the world. Additionally, LANIC hosts large amounts of content from Latin America: as of April 2010, the Yahoo! search index contained almost 120,000 URLs from the LANIC Web site. Our Gopher server, launched in 1992, was the first such information service for Latin America on the Internet, as was our Web Site, which has been in continuous service since 1994. Since the mid-1990s, LANIC has served as the official registration authority for Latin American Studies at the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Virtual Library, a precursor to Yahoo! as the Web's first large-scale subject catalog.

African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean World

African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean World African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean World Over the course of nearly 20 centuries, millions of East Africans crossed the Indian Ocean and its several seas and adjoining bodies of water in their journey to distant lands, from Arabia and Iraq to India and Sri Lanka. Called Kaffir, Siddi, Habshi, or Zanji, these men, women and children from Sudan in the north to Mozambique in the south Africanized the Indian Ocean world and helped shape the societies they entered and made their own. Free or enslaved, soldiers, servants, sailors, merchants, mystics, musicians, commanders, nurses, or founders of dynasties, they contributed their cultures, talents, skills and labor to their new world, as millions of their descendants continue to do. Yet, their heroic odyssey remains little known. The African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean World traces a truly unique and fascinating story of struggles and achievements across a variety of societies, cultures, religions, languages and times.

African Diaspora International Film Festival

African Diaspora International Film Festival African Diaspora International Film Festival ADFF?s mission is to present these films to diverse audiences, redesign the Black cinema experience, and strengthen the role of African and African descent directors in contemporary world cinema. In response to this mission, ADFF features the work of emerging and established filmmakers of color. Most important, ADFF distinguishes itself through its presentation of outstanding works that shine a different or comprehensive light on African Diaspora life and culture ?no matter what the filmmaker?s race or nationality.The African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF) presents an eclectic mix of urban, classic, independent and foreign films that depict the richness and diversity of the life experience of people of African descent and Indigenous people all over the world. Welcome to the world of the African Diaspora Film Festival. In our reality, people from diverse races, nationalities and backgrounds come together to enjoy important cinematic works of creativity, intellectual expansion, identity, and equality. In this world there are no boundaries around people because they are embraced in a universal understanding of humanity. This is the element of commonality that weaves through this annual event of images from Africa and the African Diaspora. Today more than at any other time there are more films by black directors, more films on the black experience, and more films with featured black actors enjoyed by all audiences. Notwithstanding, the international Black communities, whether in Europe, Latin America or Africa, continue to play a disproportionately marginal role in the art of cinema. Further, many creative and visionary films lay languid, collecting dust without the light of a screening owing to the lack of distribution outlets that showcase the films of our experience. The images of stereotypes, myths, and deprived cultural experiences continue to be drawn out while talented people of color proceed to run up against the infamous ?numbers? game with respect as to how many directors or films of color can an ?already permeated? market absorb.

African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF)

African Diaspora International Film Festival, ADIFF African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF) The African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF) presents an eclectic mix of urban, classic, independent and foreign films that depict the richness and diversity of the life experience of people of African descent and Indigenous people all over the world. Welcome to the world of the African Diaspora International Film Festival. In our reality, people from diverse races, nationalities and backgrounds come together to enjoy important cinematic works of creativity, intellectual expansion, identity, and equality. In this world there are no boundaries around people because they are embraced in a universal understanding of humanity. This is the element of commonality that weaves through this annual event of images from Africa and the African Diaspora. Today more than at any other time there are more films by black directors, more films on the black experience, and more films with featured black actors enjoyed by all audiences. Notwithstanding, the international Black communities, whether in Europe, Latin America or Africa, continue to play a disproportionately marginal role in the art of cinema. Further, many creative and visionary films lay languid, collecting dust without the light of a screening owing to the lack of distribution outlets that showcase the films of our experience. The images of stereotypes, myths, and deprived cultural experiences continue to be drawn out while talented people of color proceed to run up against the infamous “numbers” game with respect as to how many directors or films of color can an “already permeated” market absorb. ADIFF’s mission is to present these films to diverse audiences, redesign the Black cinema experience, and strengthen the role of African and African descent directors in contemporary world cinema. In response to this mission, ADIFF features the work of emerging and established filmmakers of color. Most important, ADFF distinguishes itself through its presentation of outstanding works that shine a different or comprehensive light on African Diaspora life and culture –no matter what the filmmaker’s race or nationality. By placing the spotlight on innovative films that would otherwise be ignored by traditional venues, the Festival offers a unique platform for conveying African Diaspora artistic styles and craft in film. The ADIFF is a bridge between diverse communities looking for works that cannot be found in other festivals and talented and visionary filmmakers and works that are part of Africa and the African Diaspora. The ADIFF is paving the road in the new millennium by breaking through boundaries that keep our communities from knowing their own stories as well as each others. Moreover, filmmakers, writers, actors, producers, and other Festival artists share valuable moments of insight describing their craft, style, and vision in a series of post-screenings conversations the ADIFF features. By marking the methods that underscore the art of cinema, the Festival demystifies the traditionally “elite and exclusive” aura of the filming process. These forums give rise to spontaneous and meaningful interaction between the featured artists and the audience. The ADIFF was created in November, 1993 by the husband and wife team of Reinaldo Barroso-Spech & Diarah N’Daw-Spech on the belief that education is power. He is an educator in foreign languages and Black Literature and she is a financial consultant and university budget manager. They are of the reality that film is the truest medium for creating a fertile ground for education. The future of our communities of color is directly tied to the expansion of our experiences, the depth and breadth of our reach and interaction with other communities and the framework from which our talent can stand front and center. Our vision is to see an informed and talented community coming together to exchange ideas and strategies for improving our respective worlds. Welcome to our future.

African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics

African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics, African Diaspora, African Diaspora in Mathematics African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics The African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics is an international journal for mathematical research of highest rank dedicated to the publication of carefully refereed research articles in all areas of pure and applied mathematics. A paper submitted to the ADJM must be original, nontrivial, and well-written. The African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics is abstracted and indexed by MATHSCINET ZENTRALBLATT-MATH The African Diaspora Journal of Mathematics is in partnership with PROJECT EUCLID (Cornell University Library and Duke University Press).

African Diaspora Marketplace

African Diaspora Marketplace, ADM African Diaspora Marketplace About the African Diaspora Marketplace Launched in 2009 by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Western Union, the African Diaspora Marketplace (ADM) aims to encourage sustainable economic growth and employment by supporting African diaspora entrepreneurs. ADM entrepreneurs are individuals with demonstrable connections to or experience in Africa, and who have innovative and high-impact start-ups or established businesses on the continent. About the African Diaspora Marketplace Launched in 2009 by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Western Union, the African Diaspora Marketplace (ADM) aims to encourage sustainable economic growth and employment by supporting African diaspora entrepreneurs. ADM entrepreneurs are individuals with demonstrable connections to or experience in Africa, and who have innovative and high-impact start-ups or established businesses on the continent. ADM is also collaborating with the African Women’s Entrepreneurship Program (AWEP), a network of 1600 women across 22 chapters supported by the U.S. Department of State and USAID. Given the parallel objectives of the two initiatives, this partnership aims to leverage the ADM and AWEP platforms to support women entrepreneurs and encourage their participation in the ADM program. Additionally, in the summer of 2012, Western Union and USAID announced the Libyan Diaspora Marketplace competition (LDM). The Libyan Diaspora Marketplace (LDM) is a continuation of the African Diaspora Marketplace (“ADM”) business plan competition. Applications were accepted from existing businesses as well as start-ups in all sectors. On October 31, 2013. LDM awarded three companies. Halo Automotive, Noour and Rawaabit with matched grants and accompanying technical assistance. Industry sectors represented among the winners include Agribusiness. Information and Communication Technology and Transportation.

African Diaspora Meetups

African Diaspora Meetups African Diaspora Meetups African Diaspora Meetups Find out what's happening in African Diaspora Meetup groups around the world and start meeting up with the ones near you. Related topics: Black Culture · African Culture · Africans · Black Professionals · Blackology · Caribbean Culture · Reggae · African Music · Black Women · African Americans

AFRICAN DIASPORA NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC ETHNIC CORDINATING COUNCIL

AFRICAN DIASPORA NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC ETHNIC CORDINATING COUNCIL AFRICAN DIASPORA NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC ETHNIC CORDINATING COUNCIL Mobilization of African Diaspora community across the country to have identifiable platform/synergy in the spirit of Democratic party, to ensure the African Diaspora community concerns are heard & addressed, and to develop caucuses and future leaders to represent the interest of African Diaspora community. Also promote Economic Growth and Development

African Diaspora Network

African Diaspora Network African Diaspora Network ADN offers Africans and friends of Africa the opportunity to enhance their impact on the continent and grow professionally and persanally. As an online and offline social network platform, ADN will promote dialogue and action on economic development in Africa

African Diaspora Network (ADN)

African Diaspora Network, ADN African Diaspora Network (ADN) African Diaspora Network (ADN) is a registered 501(c)(3) organization that offers Africans and friends of Africa the opportunity to enhance their impact on the continent and grow professionally and personally. ADN promotes dialogue and action on social and economic development issues in Africa; we foster collaboration between individuals and groups interested in Africa's future in order to benefit indigenous Africans around the world. By sharing knowledge and forming partnerships ADN harnesses the intellectual, financial, philanthropic, and entrepreneurial capacity of Africans and friends of Africa for the greater good of the continent. We do this by providing a knowledge sharing platform for: Investors/Entrepreneurs: ADN is a forum through which organizations investing in Africa – or African entrepreneurs directly – can share their projects and business plans, and seek financial support. Philanthropists/Volunteers: ADN offers opportunities for identifying new members and sources of income. Philanthropists can profile their work and share experiences/best practices with like-minded individuals and organizations. Potential volunteers can identify organizations with which they would like to work. Donors/Lenders: ADN offers donors/lenders the opportunity to connect with ongoing and potential development/investment projects across Africa. ADN is a conduit through which donors, lenders, and investors can connect. Read More Our Vision ADN's vision is a global community of Africans and friends of Africa connected by a common purpose: the greater good of the African continent.

African Diaspora Newspapers & Periodicals

African Diaspora Newspapers and Periodicals African Diaspora Newspapers & Periodicals Africans are present in nearly every country on the planet. In the diaspora, Africans have produced thousands of newspapers and periodicals beginning in the nineteenth century. Unfortunately this potentially valuable resource is beyond the reach of scholars and others because of the absence of a comprehensive international documentation strategy for the collection, preservation, and access to these publications. The goal of the African Diaspora Press Project is to begin to address this vast task. The Project will follow the model developed by AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS: A NATIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.In order to begin to cover the African Diaspora, beyond North America which is covered in the above volume, the Project is actively seeking scholars in every country who can help identify the likely titles and related materials that will help to create an international, comparative history of Africans in the diaspora. The Project is in its infancy but over the 10-15 years that such an effort may take, hopes to provide valuable service to the scholarly community and beyond.

AFRICAN DIASPORA ON THE INTERNET

AFRICAN DIASPORA ON THE INTERNET AFRICAN DIASPORA ON THE INTERNET References AFRICAN DIASPORA ON THE INTERNET

African Diaspora on the Internet

African Diaspora on the Internet African Diaspora on the Internet African Diaspora on the Internet

African diaspora on Wikipedia

African diaspora, African diaspora on Wikipedia African diaspora on Wikipedia The African diaspora refers to the communities throughout the world that are descended from the historic movement of peoples from Africa, predominantly to the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, among other areas around the globe. The term has been historically applied in particular to the descendants of the West and Central Africans who were enslaved and shipped to the Americas in the Atlantic slave trade, with the largest population in Brazil (see Afro-Brazilian), followed by the USA[1] and others.[2] Some scholars identify "four circulatory phases" of migration out of Africa.[3] The term has also less commonly been used to refer to recent emigration from Africa.[4] The African Union defines the African diaspora as: "[consisting] of people of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union." Its constitutive act declares that it shall "invite and encourage the full participation of the African diaspora as an important part of our continent, in the building of the African Union." The phrase "African diaspora" was coined during the 1990s, and gradually entered common usage during the 2000s. Use of the term "diaspora" is modelled after the concept of Jewish diaspora.[5]

African Diaspora Policy Centre

African Diaspora Policy Centre African Diaspora Policy Centre Vision: Our vision is an African continent with sufficient means and human capacity to pursue its own social, political and economic development potential to the fullest. Mission: Our mission is to empower African Diaspora as change agents for the development of Africa. We aim to contribute to an environment for the diaspora to maximize its potential-capital, knowledge and networks.

African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC)

African Diaspora Policy Centre, ADPC African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) The African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) is a leading African diaspora think tank in Europe in the field of migration and development. It is particularly devoted to the study of the nexus between migration and development related issues from the perspective of the diaspora.

African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC)

African Diaspora Policy Centre, ADPC African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) The African Diaspora Policy Centre (ADPC) is a leading African diaspora think tank in Europe in the field of migration and development. It is particularly devoted to the study of the nexus between migration and development related issues from the perspective of the diaspora. The centre compiles, analyses and disseminates information and insights on a number of critical areas, including migration and development, peace-building, governance and brain gain. It is also at the forefront of generating knowledge and information primarily targeted at three groups: African Diaspora organizations in Europe, development practitioners and policymakers dealing with diaspora related issues, both in Africa and in Europe. Furthermore, the ADPC is committed to stimulating informed policy dialogue and constructive debates between the diaspora and other stakeholders in the field of migration and development. The ADPC is a unique African diaspora institution set up by the diaspora. It is established to spur and galvanize the contribution of African diaspora to the development of the continent in a more structured, sustainable and systematic manner. The centre is dedicated to empowering African diaspora as change agents for the development of Africa. It also advocates and contributes to policy and practical changes conducive to their effective participation in the overall development of Africa. The work of the centre is dedicated to supporting and mobilising the African diaspora in Europe to pool their resources (capital, knowledge and networks) for the development benefits of Africa. It is also devoted to accelerating the development in Africa by facilitating the building of viable development bridges between African diaspora communities in Europe and their home countries on the continent in a more structured and systematic manner. The ADPC achieves its goals by conducting evidence-based policy relevant research; providing capacity building and training workshops; organizing expert meetings and conferences; facilitating contacts and networking relations; disseminating information through publications; and offering consultancy and information services.

African Diaspora Press

African Diaspora Press, African Diaspora African Diaspora Press A new voice on the Africana publishing scene, African Diaspora Press is a scholarly imprint specializing in bibliographies about expressive culture of Africa and the African diaspora. Aimed primarily at the library market its works are meant to provide the scholarly community—librarians, researchers, students and others—with state-of-the-art reference tools that help bridge the print world of the past and the digital world of the present and future. In an era in which most reference publishers have abandoned bibliography as a subject ADP has made it its core mission to provide comprehensive, annotated, and up-to-date surveys of the literature—print, electronic, and audio-visual—for each of the titles it publishes. We believe passionately that, despite the wealth of electronic resources currently available to the library user, there is still a sizable universe of materials, both print and digital, archival and visual, that is missing from these sources. In addition, as the number and size of online databases has grown it has become increasingly difficult to determine what, if any, of the information they include might be relevant for a term paper, a thesis or book. Our works, based on years of dedicated archival research, help to open a window into these hidden resources as well as to offer a guide to relevant materials from online databases, the Internet and beyond. Forthcoming titles, most to be issued in series, include volumes on music and dance, theatre, film and religion of sub-Saharan Africa and its global diaspora. The defining characteristics of each work will be their clear organization, exhaustive research, and careful attention to details of design and production. Amongst their literally thousands of entries users will find both scholarly and popular materials, principally from the humanities and social sciences, in most European languages as well as several from Africa and the Creole-speaking Americas. In addition, all titles will be accompanied by scholarly forewords and introductions, thorough cross-referencing, full, and frequently annotated, citations, appendices, subject and author indexes, and more.

African Diaspora Press

African Diaspora Press African Diaspora Press A new voice on the Africana publishing scene, African Diaspora Press is a scholarly imprint specializing in bibliographies about expressive culture of Africa and the African diaspora. Aimed primarily at the library market its works are meant to provide the scholarly community—librarians, researchers, students and others—with state-of-the-art reference tools that help bridge the print world of the past and the digital world of the present and future. In an era in which most reference publishers have abandoned bibliography as a subject ADP has made it its core mission to provide comprehensive, annotated, and up-to-date surveys of the literature—print, electronic, and audio-visual—for each of the titles it publishes. We believe passionately that, despite the wealth of electronic resources currently available to the library user, there is still a sizable universe of materials, both print and digital, archival and visual, that is missing from these sources. In addition, as the number and size of online databases has grown it has become increasingly difficult to determine what, if any, of the information they include might be relevant for a term paper, a thesis or book. Our works, based on years of dedicated archival research, help to open a window into these hidden resources as well as to offer a guide to relevant materials from online databases, the Internet and beyond. Forthcoming titles, most to be issued in series, include volumes on music and dance, theatre, film and religion of sub-Saharan Africa and its global diaspora. The defining characteristics of each work will be their clear organization, exhaustive research, and careful attention to details of design and production. Amongst their literally thousands of entries users will find both scholarly and popular materials, principally from the humanities and social sciences, in most European languages as well as several from Africa and the Creole-speaking Americas. In addition, all titles will be accompanied by scholarly forewords and introductions, thorough cross-referencing, full, and frequently annotated, citations, appendices, subject and author indexes, and more.

African Diaspora Program (ADP)

African Diaspora Program, ADP African Diaspora Program (ADP) ADP seeks to further enable and enhance the human and financial capital contributions of African Diasporas to the economic development of their home countries. The program was launched in September 2007 and focuses on strengthening policy, financial, and human capital development in Africa through a portfolio of activities and support in partnership with the African Union (AU), partner countries, partner donors, and African Diaspora Professional Networks and Hometown Associations.

African Diaspora Program at The University of Texas at Austin

African Diaspora Program, African Diaspora Program at The University of Texas at Austin African Diaspora Program at The University of Texas at Austin The Department of Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin offers M.A. and Ph.D. specializations in African Diaspora Studies. The African Diaspora Graduate Program in Anthropology, established in 1992 with the collaboration of the Center for African and African American Studies, employs the theories and methods of anthropology in comparative research on African-descended communities. While recognizing the global nature of the African Diaspora, faculty research is primarily concentrated in North, Central, and South America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa. Course offerings focus on transnational socioeconomic and cultural patterns, particularly as they relate to the legacies of slavery and the establishment of contemporary social and cultural formations. Areas of Study Faculty research is concentrated in three main areas: social and cultural linkages between Africa and its diaspora and among diasporan communities; racial, ethnic, and cultural identities in the African Diaspora; power relations in the African Diaspora, particularly as related to gender, race, and nation. Current developments in academic theory and intellectual inquiry such as discourse theory, cultural studies, critical race theory, and feminist scholarship, are used to provide insight into the voluntary and involuntary migrations, resettlement, and evolution in new contexts of African-descended populations. The Center for African and African-American Studies provides institutional support for the Program, serving as a link between affiliated faculty members from a variety of disciplines, as well as organizing conferences, lecture and film/video series, and other activities designed to create a stimulating intellectual environment. The study of African-descended populations in the Americas is buttressed by the University of Texas' stature as a national and international leader in research on Latin America, the locus of the majority of the African Diaspora. The University's Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) provides the opportunity to pursue graduate research on African-descended populations in the region by offering an M.A. focus on the African Diaspora in Latin America. Information is available through LLILAS or at (512) 471-5551.

African Diaspora Relationships

African Diaspora Relationships African Diaspora Relationships Is dating and marriage between blacks throughout the African Diaspora the future of black relationships? In my opinion it is and here is the reason why: It is no secret that black men and women in America are having difficulties in recent years in terms of what we expect from one another, and dating prospects within our community. Indeed there have been numerous discussions held on the internet, TV, in movies and magazines on this very subject. Typical in these debates will be statistics showing the number of African American men in prisons, the number of homosexuals in the African American community; single mothers raising children without the support of any male figure; the ratio of educated black women compared to that of educated black men; and arguments about the so-called shortage of black males. In almost all of these debates, choosing to date different cultures is a proposed solution to the perceived shortage of desirable dating prospects in the African American community. By different cultures, the authors and participants of these debates are almost always refering to interracial dating. Whether it be whites, hispanics, or asians; the implication is that black people can not find differences of beliefs and experience among our own. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is not necessary to go outside of the race to explore different cultures and attitudes towards dating, family, and male-female relations. Black people are literally all over the world. Occupying over 50 different countries in Africa alone, as well as countries in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, and Canada. Each country has its own unique culture, beliefs, and value system. This website was created to celebrate these types of relationships, and to recognize the potential they have to strengthen black families throughout the world. The potential and promise of African Diasporan relationships is that they allow black people to broaden their knowledge and experience of different cultures while simultaneously strengthening the bonds of black communities. African Diasporan relationships gives black people to opportunity to not only build bridges but to create communities. In short African Diasporan relationships are the future of black relationships....Let's Discuss!

African Diaspora Religions

African Diaspora Religions African Diaspora Religions The continent of Africa has been home to hundreds of indigenous tribes speaking a wide variety of languages and believing a wide variety of different spiritual ideas. One certainly cannot speak of "African religion" as if it was a single, coherent set of beliefs. The versions of these religions as they developed in the New World became known as African Diaspora religions. Origins When African slaves were transported to the New World between the 16th and 19th centuries, they each brought their own personal beliefs. However, slave owners deliberately mixed slaves from a variety of different backgrounds together in order to have a slave population that could not easily communicate with itself, and thus curtail the ability to rebel. Moreover, Christian slave owners frequently forbade the practice of pagan religions (even when they also forbade conversion to Christianity). As such, groups of slaves practiced in secret among strangers united by circumstance. Traditions from multiple tribes began to mix together. They might also adopt New World native beliefs if natives were also being used for slave labor. Finally, as slaves started being allowed to convert to Christianity (with the understanding that such a conversion would not free them from slavery), they began mixing in Christian beliefs as well, either out of actual belief or out of a need to disguise their actual practices. Because the African Diaspora religions draw strongly from multiple distinct sources, they are also commonly identified as syncretic religions. The Diaspora A diaspora is a scattering of people, generally under duress, in multiple directions. The Atlantic Slave Trade is one of the most well known causes of a diaspora, scattering African slaves throughout North and South America. The Jewish diasporas at the hands of Babylon and the Roman Empire is another fairly familiar example. Vodou (Voodoo) Santeria Candomble Umbanda Quimbanda [Above All the Blood of Jesus is What Can Save. DO you believe in Jesus?]

African Diaspora Sites

African Diaspora Sites African Diaspora Sites African Diaspora Sites are ...

African Diaspora Society

African Diaspora Society, african diaspora African Diaspora Society THE AFRICAN DIASPORA SOCIETY AT EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY ARTICLE I—NAME OF ORGANIZATION The name of this organization shall be the African Diaspora Society (ADS) at East Tennessee Sate University. ARTICLE II—MISSION STATEMENT It is the mission of the African Diaspora Society at East Tennessee State University to promote the University’s commitment to developing awareness and understanding of global issues that affect all humanity. In addition, the ADS’s mission is to foster an appreciation and respect for the contributions of Africa and peoples of African descent, in all parts of the world, to world civilization. ARTICLE III—THE PURPOSE The purpose of the ADS is three-fold. First, the organization, through the dissemination of information, will enhance the public’s knowledge of African cultures and the contributions of African nations and peoples of African descent in other parts of the world. Secondly, the ADS will assist in promoting the African and African American Studies Program through the recruitment of AFAM minors. It will also assist in the development of a strong bond between the ADS and AFAM minors. Thirdly, the ADS will develop humanitarian ties with Africa and other parts of the world where the descendants of Africans have made a major impact, with particular emphasis on North America and South America.

African Diaspora Studies at Kenyon College

African Diaspora Studies at Kenyon College African Diaspora Studies at Kenyon College Interdisciplinary The concentration has four central goals: (1) to offer students a structured program in the study of Africa and the African diaspora, (2) to help students explore the variety of cultural types and formations in the African diaspora, (3) to expose students to the connections between African studies and African American studies, and (4) to promote curricular and extracurricular interest in and awareness of the cultures of the African diaspora for the campus as a whole. THE CURRICULUM The African Diaspora Studies program consists of: AFDS 110 Introduction to African Diaspora Studies 1 unit of foundation courses (.5 unit in African studies and .5 unit in African American studies) 1.5 units of advanced courses (in no fewer than two departments) A .5 unit senior-level seminar course. Courses approved for AFDS Senior Seminar Credit: AFDS 410 Between Womanism and Feminism ANTH 471 Ethnomedicine: Africa ENGL 487 The Mulatto in American Fiction ENGL 488 Richard Wright and Toni Morrison SOCY 422 Topics in Social Stratification SOCY 463 Intersection Theory HIST 411 The Civil Rights Era Each spring, the director of the concentration, in consultation with Crossroads, the program's advisory committee, will determine the courses offered during the upcoming academic year that will fulfill the various program requirements. Courses counted toward a student's major may be counted toward concentration requirements. For a complete list of courses fulfilling the various requirements, students should consult the African diaspora studies website on the Kenyon website. Students who wish to declare a concentration in African diaspora studies should consult with the program director. FOR FIRST-YEAR AND NEW STUDENTS We offer two distinct introductory courses to orient students to the interdisciplinary nature of African Diaspora Studies at Kenyon College. These courses are AFDS 108 and AFDS 110. Each course places a distinct emphasis upon critical thinking, oral presentation and critical writing as integral components of the learning experience. The objective of each course is to introduce students to the wide range of approaches which exist to develop a firm grasp of African Diaspora Studies as it currently exists, as informed by past events, and as history continues to unfold. TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY Transfer credit may be applied toward fulfilling the 1.5 units of required advanced coursework. Students planning to study abroad should seek approval of transfer credits, in advance, from the director.

AFRICAN DIASPORA TV

AFRICAN DIASPORA TV AFRICAN DIASPORA TV AFRICAN DIASPORA TV ...

African Diaspora Youth Network in Europe

African Diaspora Youth Network in Europe African Diaspora Youth Network in Europe 1 - Vision: A world Where every African Diaspora youth in Europe can unite and Global Citizens Contribute to the sustainable development of Both continents have. 2 - Objectives: To Provide a space for Individuals and organizations to exchange and share smilar Interests, goals and aspirations; To offer Strategic Support for capacity-building, networking and the dissemination of Good Practices; To voice the Concerns of icts member organizations in the political agenda of Governmental, as well as European, African and international institutions; To Produce policies and positions, All which are based on the research, experience and expertise of young Africans living in Europe. 3 - Mission: To be the network That connects organizations and Individuals to Collaborate and Actively Participate as Global Citizens to shape the lives of young people African Diaspora in Europe.

African Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Africa in a Global World

African Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Africa in a Global World African Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Africa in a Global World Online submission: Articles for publication in African Diaspora can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here. This scholarly journal seeks to understand how African cultures and societies shape and are shaped by historical and current diasporic and transnational movements. Contrary to assuming 'Africa' as a bounded geographical entity and the African diaspora as a single imagined community, the journal charts uncovered territories and entangled histories of plural diasporas and transnational movements from, to and within Africa. These include, but are not limited to, the Transatlantic, the Indian Ocean, the Middle East as well as Europe and the former socialist countries of the European continent. By focusing on when and how diasporas are produced and lived, diasporic connections are claimed, and transnational engagements evolve, the journal fosters a view on the ways in which these movements are navigated by people, networks, communities and states in historical, political and socio-cultural terms. This journal pursues placing at the centre of its attention the diasporians' and migrants' own experiences and expressions of these interlocking forms of mobility. Providing an academic context for the interpolation of the ways in which diasporic and transnational movements reinforce, negotiate or negate one another forms the core of the interdisciplinary approach this journal fosters. The ways in which the diversity of these flows subsequently produce mediations of contact, contest or conflict vis-à-vis the social fabric of sending and receiving situations and within transnational networks is elementary to the critical social theory the journal's academic debate is promoting. Issues of boundary making and crossing, belonging and citizenship, kinship and family configurations, religious ritual and symbolism, popular expressions and public culture, economic initiative and political agency form the heart of the diversity of these mediations. The journal therefore encourages the submission of articles that are groundbreaking in their empirically founded re-conceptualizations of this intellectual terrain. The journal publishes peer reviewed articles based on original research, short notes and communications, and book reviews. Occasionally it will produce thematic issues. It is the journal's policy to encourage publication by junior scholars and to provide a platform for discussion and exchange relevant to policy. The journal is bi-lingual and welcomes contributions both in English and French. All articles will have abstracts in both languages ...

African Entrepreneurs Coalition, AEC

African Entrepreneurs Coalition, AEC African Entrepreneurs Coalition, AEC The African Entrepreneurs Coalition (AEC) is an independent business development & trade association dedicated to the promotion of trade and investment between public and private businesses located in the United States and Africa. We offer members workshops, conferences and networking opportunities intended to strengthen international business management, investment, and trade between the countries of Africa and the US. Founded in 2013, the Coalition serves as an advocate for the creation, growth, and development businesses who are committed to contributing to Africa’s development. We actively promote the expansion of business opportunities on behalf of our membership through referrals, business match-making, seminars & events, trade missions and related activities. The Coalition is a non-partisan organization; hence, our focus is solely on economic expansion, business development, and increasing trade volume for our members. We are committed to leading, educating, and creating opportunities for our members to grow their businesses while serving as a spirited advocate for the development of Africa. Our Purpose The primary objective of the Coalition is to facilitate business to business (B2B) relationships as well as develop opportunities for investments and trade between our constituencies involved in the following sectors: International Trade and Commerce Energy and Mining Financial Services Tourism Agriculture Infrastructure Health and Pharmaceuticals Commercial & Residential Real Estate

African Foundation for Development

African Foundation for Development African Foundation for Development How we work: Here at AFFORD we pride ourselves in the way we work and how we achieve results - organisationally and through our interactions with local SMEs. We hope our work will be a legacy for young Africans who want to engage with their continent and participate in projects and programmes that sit at the core of our work. Our organisational workforce reflects the diversity of the continent of Africa and those non-Africans who equally share our passion for her. AFFORD?s initiatives have had major positive impacts on local African development on two broad fronts. Firstly, the creation of a new diaspora-development framework have expanded and enhanced the range of development partnerships, many of which would have remained dormant or marginal. Secondly, for the past decade, AFFORD has applied its pioneering and innovative expertise to the subject matter of job creation in Africa, especially in post-conflict Sierra Leone. Since 1994, and over the past decade especially, about 20 African governments have created diaspora ministries, departments or units. Many more have ? to varying degrees ? adopted and implemented specific diaspora-development policies ranging from the issuing of diaspora-bonds for local projects to partnership schemes with local governments. Most importantly, there is widespread acceptance of this development framework and civil society, community, corporate, governmental and other bodies are all finding their own ways of facilitating enhanced diaspora input to local development. As the new millennium dawned, AFFORD realised that a momentum was gathering towards acceptance of the diaspora-development framework. Consequently, it adopted a new strategic goal of expanding and enhancing the role of the diaspora in job creation in Africa. This led to a range of pioneering initiatives that gives local populations options and opportunities to take charge of their own development.

African Foundation for Development (AFFORD)

African Foundation for Development, AFFORD African Foundation for Development (AFFORD) How we work: Here at AFFORD we pride ourselves in the way we work and how we achieve results - organisationally and through our interactions with local SMEs. We hope our work will be a legacy for young Africans who want to engage with their continent and participate in projects and programmes that sit at the core of our work. Our organisational workforce reflects the diversity of the continent of Africa and those non-Africans who equally share our passion for her.

African Governments on the WWW

African Governments on the WWW, African Governments African Governments on the WWW African Governments on the is everything Governments in Africa ...

AFRICAN HERITAGE STUDIES ASSOCIATION

AFRICAN HERITAGE STUDIES ASSOCIATION AFRICAN HERITAGE STUDIES ASSOCIATION The organization grew out of a protest at the 1968 African Studies Association (ASA) meeting in Los Angeles. Led by Dr. John H. Clark, African descendant scholars demanded changes in ASA's Eurocentric approaches to African Studies and its marginalization of African descendant scholars. Due to the failure of ASA to reform itself, the African descendant scholars occupied the 1969 ASA Annual Meeting in Montreal, with the support of scholars from around the globe. Following the 1969 occupation, the concerned African descendants incorporated AHSA in New York in 1969 following a meeting at Federal City College. Dr. John H. Clark was the founding AHSA President and James Turner, Leonard Jeffries, Shelby Lewis (Smith), Nicholas Enyewu and Edward Scobie were among the founding Directors of the organization. The 1st AHSA Annual Conference was held at Howard University in 1970. The 2nd was held at Southern University (1971), the 3rd was held at (1972). It is important to note that AHSA successfully challenged the right of ASA to be seated as the official US delegation to the 1973 International Association of Africanists in Addis Ababa. The challenge resulted in Dr. John H. Clarke, AHSA's President, being selected to serve as leader of a joint AHSA-ASA delegation. AHSA Commissions Archival Commission, Shiela Flemming-Hunter, Commissioner. Members: Ann Swanson andWilliam Dorsery Education Commission: TBA AHSA History Commission: Leonard Jefferies, Commissioner. Members: Shelby Lewis and James Turner Policy and Activism Commission: Mack Jones, Commissioner. Members: William Boone and Gloria Braxton Annual Conference Commission: Mae King, Commissioner. Members: Shelby Lewis, Festus Ohaebulam and William Boone, Chair, Local Arrangement Committee. AHSA Legacy Over the past four decades, AHSA has played a major role in promoting the heritage of African peoples through scholarly research, influencing US policy towards Africa, educational and cultural activities around the globe. The best and brightest African scholar/activists from have participated in AHSA annual conferences and are committed to renewing AHSA's quest goal of igniting an African Renaissance. Why AHSA Matters Documents & Archives To submit documents for the archives, contact archives@africanheritagestudies.org​ A review of AHSA's goals and former conference programs illustrate the importance of AHSA's role as the major challenger of the Eurocentric view of Africa and African Studies The 1968 protest against the marginalization of African descendant scholars and their scholarship during the African Studies Association's (ASA) Annual Conference in Los Angeles was the first salvo in the struggle. ASA's unwillingness to acknowledge and address the just grievances of African descendant scholars led to their take-over of a major plenary session during ASA's 1969 Annual Conference in Montreal. This bold action and ASA's continued failure to appropriately address the scholars' grievances led to the incorporation of a separate organization in New York in 1969. The name of the organization, African Heritage Studies Association (AHSA), proudly heralded an African-centered, African controlled professional organization committed to researching, analyzing and promoting the heritage and legacy of African peoples. By 1973, AHSA was able to successfully challenge the seating of ASA as the sole USA representative to the meeting of the International Association of Africanists (IAA) in Addis Ababa. Due to this challenge, AHSA and ASA met and negotiated an arrangement wherein AHSA's President (John H. Clarke) was selected to head a joint USA delegation to IAA over ASA's President (Philip Curtin). Both organizations made significant contributions to the meeting, but from that moment forward, AHSA's role in African Studies was recognized and respected by scholars around globe. AHSA Annual Conferences, beginning at Howard University in 1970 and Southern University in 1971, and, subsequently, at over 40 cities and universities across the US continued the organization's commitment to situating African history in its rightful place in the development of world civilization and to promoting African-centered scholarly research, teaching, publications and discussions about the ancient and contemporary heritage and legacy of African peoples. AHSA's activist role in critiquing and pressuring elected officials on US policy towards Africa and its effective promotion and support of Black Studies and African Studies in US colleges, universities and pre-collegiate schools is a significant part of the organization's legacy. Countless newspaper, magazine and refereed journal articles, monograms, books and book chapters have been published by AHSA members over the past four decades. Additionally, the best and brightest African-centered scholars and activists have participated in annual AHSA conferences and have informed and inspired a generation of scholars who now take for granted African-centered scholarship and the place of Africa's heritage and legacy in world history. This is why AHSA matters and why it must continue to develop and expand. Past Presidents 1969-1972, John Henrik Clarke 1972-1976, James Turner 1976-1980, Ronald Walters 1980-1982, Leonard Jeffries 1982-1984, James Turner 1985-1989, W. Ofuatey-Kodjoe 1985-1989, Charshee McIntyre 1992-1996, William “Nick” Nelson, Jr. 1996-1999, LaVerme Gyant 1999-2002, Leslie Alexander 2002-2006, Abdul Nanji

African Holocaust

African Holocaust African Holocaust African Holocaust (Est. 2001) is a non-profit civil society dedicated to the progressive study of African history and culture. The society is loosely composed of diverse array of African scholars and writers, who share the desire use critical thinking to represent and restore an authentic, reflexive, honest, inclusive and balanced study of the African experience, past and present. contents About Support Us with Trade Language policy Who are you? History and Media Bias History Never Forget African Code Questions about AHS What is Racism A New Paradigm Religion Debate and Disagreement Join Us Motherland Project (E) The site is a platform to educate, empower and enlighten. Enhancing the visibility of African history and culture, while adding clarity from an African ethical and cultural standpoint. African Holocaust Society does not at any stage advocate binary history or propaganda: The facts remain the facts, while the analysis is within African paradigms. We reject all manifestations of oppression (From South Africa to Palestine), ignorance, racism, globalization, monoculturalization, cultural imperialism, gender suppression, religious intolerance (Islamophobia, antisemitism, etc), and ethnic hatred. We create new opportunities for the potential of marginalized people by addressing institutional racism, which has stymied hope and multicultural contributions. African Holocaust does authentic in-house research. We use primary and secondary sources. We went to Sudan and Egypt for African Kingdoms, we went into the libraries of Timbuktu, mosque in Ethiopia for Islam and Africa,. We meet with the patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox church for African and Christianity. This research is then submitted to various academics for peer review. No featured article is published without this feedback. [note] Contributors to the AHS go direct to the politicians and sources for most of our content. In places like Mali, South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Sudan, Gambia, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, and Ethiopia we have contributors and on-the-ground connections. We are part of global African think tanks, and scholarship communities. We have media access at the African Union, and other Pan-African meetings. For our African Marriage and religious web pages we physically documented the traditions. All of this research and information serves as the repository for African academics, think tanks, and progressive solutions for the African world. In addition this site is constantly reviewed by peers for quality and adherence to the ever rising threshold we place on quality research/scholarship. We believe heavily in ethics, and the responsibility of information dissemination; and the consequences of that dissemination. To have a higher conversation, requires a higher state of consciousness. We hold that no information can flow above the state of the human mind, and therefore information dissemination dually requires a challenge to our cognitive capacity to process and apply information.

African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation

African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation, AIRF African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation Our Mission The mission of the African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation (AIRF) is to facilitate the effective transition of African Immigrant to American society and to support their productive, sustainable integration into their new homeland. The History of The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation (AIRF) The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation (AIRF) was founded in 2000 to facilitate the effective transition of African Immigrant to American society and to support their productive, sustainable integration into their new homeland. The AIRF was born out of the influx of African refugees who may not have lived in urban Africa, let alone urban America. This influx is accelerated by economic and political wars which have produced unprecedented numbers of political and economic refugees. Being physically uprooted is traumatic and results in multiple suffering, isolation, loss, shock and a sense of hopelessness -often suffered over an extended period of time. As a mental Health professional, and an immigrant herself, Dr. Kamau founded the AIRF to become an oasis and a resource for the Africans who until today remain an enigma in the Western world. The AIRF in conjunction with its volunteers and funding partners empowers new arrivals with survival skills, mental health services, ESOL classes, job evaluation, preparation and placement. We also provide African Cultural Competency training to caregivers in order to enhance intercultural communication and effective interventions. African Immigrant are the fastest growing immigrant population in America. There are over 1 million African foreign born in the United States according to 2000 US Census Bureau. According to the 2000 Census, the African-born population in the D.C. Metropolitan area saw a 150% increase in the past decade. Yet, local social service agencies lack the cultural knowledge and skills required to effectively address the immediate needs of this community. Whether they arrive on immigrant visas or as refugees, newly arrived Africans face several challenges. Many are in dire need of adaptation and adjustment services with particular emphasis on coping and accessing available resources. For example, the family from Mali that tragically died in the Bronx on March 11, 2007 was unaware of the dangers of space heaters. On arrival to the US, acute needs include mental health and trauma counseling due to loss and family separation, new language and cultural skills, support with school and provision of culturally competent social service care, family reunification and immigration status adjustments assistance. For refugees, the process is often difficult, extending far beyond the first 90 days of government support, and often continuing for years after entry into the United States. The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation (AIRF) was founded to address these critical issues of mental, identity, socio-cultural, and linguistic challenges. Based on our experiences we also find adolescent refugees and older youths are particularly affected by the process and this impacts negatively on the intergenerational communication. Consequently, young people require guidance and support to overcome obstacles to mediation within the family, school system, and adjustment to American culture. For many children, formal education was interrupted during flight and resettlement and many lack language and academic skills. They are inappropriately assigned within the school setting by age. Frustrations with teachers and with schoolmates are often reported especially with African Americans with whom they are “categorized” but with whom they share little common culture. Our target population includes populations from 45 African countries. Specifically, the AIRF targets the African youth as a gateway towards reaching the parents or guardians and in turn the larger immigrant community. Vision The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation (AIRF) provides leadership to the social welfare community and relevant civic and government agencies in the Washington metropolitan area and culturally and linguistically appropriate services to African Immigrant and refugees. Core Values The mission of AIRF is founded on and implemented with the following core values: Multicultural education, adjustment, and empowerment of African Immigrant and refugees, with special emphasis on those in the national capitol region; Inclusiveness, diversity, multicultural competence, and human dignity; Exchange of ideas and strategies in mutually respectful and multidisciplinary contexts; Continuous personal, social, and cultural growth of Immigrant and refugees; Development, advancement, and distribution of knowledge relevant to the target population to those who serve this population; Outreach and advocacy on issues of concern to the target population.

African Immigrant Caucus

African Immigrant Caucus African Immigrant Caucus Building Power in the Metro-DC Area While the number of African immigrants in the U.S. is large, our community does not have the strong influence with political and corporate leaders we deserve. We want to do something to change this fact, and believe that now is the time and Metro-DC—the number one gathering spot for African immigrants across the United States—is the place. The Metro-DC African Immigrant Caucus includes representatives from many African countries, giving us a unique opportunity to lead the way for African immigrants across the country. Common Issues Require United Effort Other ethnic groups have a seat at the table and are getting their issues heard — why not Africans? Nobody will do this for us…we must do it ourselves! Political power matters and politicians take notice when a large voting block works together to impact them in the community — and at the ballot box.

African Immigrant Services

African Immigrant Services African Immigrant Services African Immigrant Services (AIS), a 501 (C) (3) community-based non-profit organization, works to create new possibilities and opportunities through civic engagement and creative access to resources. AIS is a culturally creative effort by African immigrants and refugees to build social capital through a more informed and increased civic participation. It is also established to close the resource information gaps and to eliminate the access disparities that disproportionately affect the capacities of historically disadvantaged communities of color to achieve self-sufficiency. AIS is all about civic engagement and creative access to opportunities, and the impactful outcomes they produce for the African immigrant community. AIS is determined to help unleash the untapped leadership assets of the African immigrant community, to overcome systemic and cultural barriers.

African Initiative for Community Development (AICD)

African Initiative for Community Development, AICD African Initiative for Community Development (AICD) 1 - Background: African Initiative for Community Development, Inc. (AICD) was established in 1993 by a group of Africans in Boston concerned about the increase in the African immigrant population of individuals and families whose needs were going largely unmet. There was a realization that a huge gap existed between African immigrant needs and the services available to them. This gap is even larger today with the increased number of newcomers in the community. Additionally, many in the African immigrant community tend to stay isolated and far from services and other resources needed for them to improve their lives. Legal, social and cultural reasons contribute to this phenomenon. In the beginning, AICD primarily focused on immigration matters and has reached many in the African community with immigration-related direct services and referral services. AICD's services have expanded to include job skills and job-related referrals. African Initiative for Community Development Inc. has an established office and a staff of volunteers. AICD emphasizes collaboration with other agencies and organizations in Boston. Services are provided on the basis of need without regard to nationality, creed, ethnicity and gender. 2 - Mission/Goals: To develop programs, provide services and bridge the gap between the needs in the community and the services offered. 3 - Services: AICD provides assistance ranging from immigration and naturalization issues to assisting individuals to obtain culturally and linguistically appropriate job-related training.

African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP)

African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP) African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP) In 2009, the African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP), an African-led, regional non-profit policy think tank, was established to help bridge the gaps between research, policy and practice in the areas of population change and sustainable development, and health systems strengthening in Africa. The purpose of AFIDEP’s work is to contribute to sustainable socio-economic development by enabling the formulation of policies and programme interventions that are informed by sound research evidence in these focus areas. Our Context In spite of on-going efforts to improve the utilisation of research evidence in decision-making in Africa, there remain major challenges. Available research is largely fragmented in different scientific publications and not appropriately packaged for use by decision-makers. Furthermore, the evidence often does not fully meet the policy and programme needs of decision-makers since they rarely contribute to the initial identification of the knowledge gaps that the evidence seeks to fill. Use of evidence is particularly weak in closing the big gap between policies and implementation, which remains one of the most critical development challenges in Africa. This is partly because there is limited research evidence to inform effective design and implementation of interventions that have the best potential to improve lives. Our Main Objectives To contribute to addressing these challenges, AFIDEP has three overarching objectives: 01 - Synthesise and translate research evidence 02 - Enable the utilisation of research evidence in decision-making 03 - Strengthen capacity in research evidence synthesis, translation and utilisation Since its inception, AFIDEP has made notable contributions in translating and enabling the uptake of research evidence in various decision-making processes in its areas of focus at national and regional levels in sub-Saharan Africa. AFIDEP’s 2014 – 2018 Strategic Plan provides a framework to guide the Institute in building on these past gains as well as expanding and strengthening the scope of our programmes. Specifically, we will expand the thematic and geographic scope of our research; intensify efforts that enable increased utilisation of research and related evidence in decision-making at national, regional and international levels; initiate innovative programmes that strengthen the capacity of decision-makers and scientists in translation and utilisation of evidence; and strengthen strategic partnerships with governments and other key policy actors in sub-Saharan Africa. To achieve these aspirations, we will also strengthen our internal systems and processes. AFIDEP has assembled a multi-disciplinary core staff comprising of experts trained in various social sciences, public health, policy analysis and communications. This team will be expanded during the next five years in line with the changing needs of our programmes. The Institute’s core staff is complemented by a network of Associate Fellows who contribute to our work and seek to strengthen the impact of their own work through our programmes and connections. AFIDEP is governed by a Board of Directors comprising distinguished experts, who provide strategic guidance and oversee the running of the organisation. Vision We make research evidence matter in African-driven development. Mission To translate and enable utilisation of research evidence in policy-making, primarily in the fields of population change and sustainable development, and health systems strengthening in Africa. Translation of evidence comprises its generation, synthesis and repackaging for policymakers. We work on the premise that policymakers should have access to robust and usable evidence. We enhance the capacity of African policy-makers to play a lead role in defining the need for, and utilisation of, such evidence. We pride ourselves as an African-led institution that is working toward galvanising sustainable development in Africa. Our Values As an institution, we are guided by a set of important values. Among these are: 01 - We are focused, committed and rigorous with our work. 02 - We are fair, friendly and energetic, and we support each other. 03 - We are client-oriented and impact-led. 04 - We expect to exceed our clients' expectations. 05 - We believe strongly in partnering with others at national, regional, and international levels and with a range of actors in government, academia, implementation agencies and development partners, so that together we can have a bigger impact. 06 - We absolutely expect our work will make a significant contribution to Africa’s equitable development. AFIDEP is registered as an International Non-Governmental Organisation with a mandate to work on African development policy issues by the Republic of Kenya’s Non-Governmental Organisations Board under Registration No. OP218.051.2009/0595/6183. The seed funding for establishing AFIDEP was provided by the non-profit organisation, Venture Strategies for Health and Development based in Berkeley, California. AFIDEP’s current programmes are funded by, among others, the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) - Next Einstein Initiative (NEI)

African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, AIMS, Next Einstein Initiative, NEI African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) - Next Einstein Initiative (NEI) The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) was founded in Cape Town, South Africa in 2003 as a pan-African center for post-graduate training and research providing advanced, broadly applicable mathematical skills to talented students recruited from all over Africa. Operating as a partnership between African and international universities, AIMS provides an innovative and relevant curriculum within an exceptional 24-hour learning environment. Outstanding international and African lecturers teach three week courses, leveraging the expertise and goodwill of the top academics from around the world. AIMS is already making a big difference: as of June 2013, 560 students ? 30% of them are women ? from 38 African countries have graduated from AIMS-South Africa, AIMS-Senegal and AIMS-Ghana. Majority of the alumni go into Master's and PhD programs directly after AIMS at excellent universities in Africa and abroad. AIMS graduates are now strengthening African universities, research centers, government and industry. For example, many of the mathematics lecturers at the Universities of Zambia and Khartoum are AIMS graduates and are now in turn educating hundreds of students each year. WHY? From health research to information and communications technology, from finance and banking to climate forecasting, mathematical skills are the backbone of modern societies. Research shows that investment in university level education in Africa may well be the fastest route to technological catch-up and economic development. Although nearly one million students graduate from African universities each year, high level training is generally unavailable, particularly in scientific and technical fields. Few continue to Masters or PhDs, and of those that do, fewer still remain in Africa. All of these factors have led to a critical scarcity of mathematical and scientific expertise, adversely affecting all aspects of development including education, science, industry and government. HOW? AIMS recruits students from all over Africa for a postgraduate program taught by outstanding international lecturers within an exceptional 24-hour learning environment. AIMS? curriculum focuses on advanced, broadly applicable mathematical skills relevant to Africa?s development needs. Training in mathematical science is highly cost-effective: it requires no costly laboratory overhead, yet develops strong independent thinking and problem-solving abilities, preparing students for a range of scientific and technical careers. AIMS operates as a partnership between African and international universities, combining local ownership with international oversight and involvement. ABOUT THE NEXT EINSTEIN INITIATIVE: The Next Einstein Initiative (NEI) seeks to unlock and nurture scientific and technical talent across Africa. This plan is developed in the context of growing African economic, social, and political integration. We believe that this plan will contribute to this growth and integration. NEI is a core program of AIMS and specifically involves the establishment and operation of a network of fifteen centres of excellence across Africa that is focused on the teaching of mathematical sciences to African university graduates. The initiative will be governed by an eminent Board of Directors and supported by a professional team of skilled knowledge workers appropriate to launching and expanding AIMS Centres. AIMS-NEI will create a coordinated network of centres of excellence, recruiting outstanding graduates from all over Africa to learn math and science together. As demonstrated by AIMS?South Africa, their shared passion for science will bridge cultural and national divides and build a joint commitment to an improved future for Africa. Most will continue on to Masters and PhDs in fields relevant to African development. Some will follow academic careers, helping to build teaching and research capabilities in African universities. Others will proceed to leadership roles in government, industry and enterprise. AIMS-NEI has been endorsed by the African Union and the New Partnership for Africa?s Development (NEPAD), renowned African leaders and distinguished international scientists, academic institutions in Africa, Europe and North America, charitable foundations, and corporate partners including Google, Barclays, Vodacom, Petro-SA and others. The AIMS-NEI vision has resonated with international figures from scientist Stephen Hawking to Mark Shuttleworth (the first African in space), and even celebrities such as Bob Geldof, Bono, Will Smith, Forest Whitaker and many others, who have pledged their support. We wish to particularly acknowledge the extraordinary generosity of Brook and Shawn Byers, who were AIMS-NEI's founding donors at the TED conference in 2008.

African Institute for Philanthropy and Community Renewal

African Institute for Philanthropy and Community Renewal African Institute for Philanthropy and Community Renewal The African Institute for Philanthropy and Community Renewal’s mission is to promote the understanding of philanthropy and to engrain its practice into the fabric of daily life by improving nonprofit sector performance through research, training, and dissemination of an effective community renewal strategy.

African Journal of Physics

African Journal of Physics African Journal of Physics Mission: Establish the tradition of continent wide scientific publication; Generate collaborations among African scientists world wide; Introduce/Publicize the progress in physics research and education in Africa; Introduce/Feature African Scientists to the world; Promote science, Mathematics, Technology education in Africa. Our mission can't be fulfilled without the participation of African Educators, professionals and students world wide.

African Language Materials Archive

African Language Materials Archive African Language Materials Archive The African Language Materials Archive, or ALMA, is a multi-partner project focusing on the promotion and documentation of literature and literacy in the languages of Africa. It further serves to assist African language authors and publishers in publicizing and distributing their work. ALMA’s Websites ALMA has two websites. At our original site, a section of the Digital Library for International Research, you can find African language literary documents. This, our complementary site, contains complementary materials including African language video recordings, documentary video, translation work, and bibliographies, space for which is provided by the MATRIX Project of Michigan State University. About ALMA In October 2000, UNESCO established a contract with the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) for the feasibility phase of the Senegambian portion of the African Language Material Archive (ALMA). CAORC subcontracted with the West African Research Association (WARA) to facilitate the necessary work. ALMA is an initiative that aims to increase dissemination of and access to materials published in indigenous African languages, thereby serving as a vehicle for education and literacy in Africa, and for African language study in the diaspora. ALMA involves the identification, collection, and digitization of published materials and their subsequent production in both CD-ROM and web formats. The website serves as a resource demonstrating the depth and breadth of publishing in African languages, and is designed to facilitate and publicize the work of African authors and publishers. Senegal and Gambia were chosen for the ALMA pilot since they share several prominent languages – Wolof, Pulaar, and Mandinka – in which publication has been plentiful. Since then, the project has been expanded and now presents materials from various West African countries as well as from eastern and southern African countries. ALMA is part of the CAORC-sponsored American Overseas Digital Library, which aims to make inaccessible material available in electronic form to all audiences.

African Language Project at University of Maryland Eastern Shore

African Language Project, University of Maryland Eastern Shore African Language Project at University of Maryland Eastern Shore The mission of the African Language Project s to facilitate the study of African languages emphasizing the use of authentic texts. This project concentrates on the languages spoken in countries with which the university has special ongoing relations including Nigeria, Ghana, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Sudan, and Liberia. This Project is also in preparation for the Fifth International Conference for African Languages to be convened at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore Campus in November 2008. To fulfill this aim, the African Language Project seeks: To utilize the African faculty and students from 20 different countries as a resource to assist in the collection and translation of their respective languages used in the popular media; To compile bibliographies and factual briefing information on the cultures of the countries under study; To utilize the outcomes of research in teaching, outreach and in collaborative programs with other colleges and universities; To engage in mass media studies that focus on African languages represented in the major print and visual media; To computer encode texts in concordance, database, and word processing formats; To machine translate African languages.

African Language Resources on the Internet

African Language Resources on the Internet African Language Resources on the Internet African Language Resources on the Internet ...

African Language Technology

African Language Technology African Language Technology Interest in language technology research for African languages has seen a tremendous increase in recent years. This is marked by the growing availability of digital corpora, dictionaries and tools for many (formerly) resource-scarce African languages. The AfLaT website aims to catalogue these resources for the benefit of researchers interested in African language technology. AfLaT.org contains a steadily growing collection of bibliographic resources, web links and tools, provided by AfLaT members. We would like to invite you to join this community effort and share information, discuss research topics or just simply browse through the available content. Registration is free of charge.

African Law Students Association

African Law Students Association African Law Students Association The AFRICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (ALSA)?is based at Columbia Law School in New York. ALSA works to articulate, promote, and provide a forum for the Law School community to meet and pursue their interest in African cultures, societies and laws. We are especially dedicated to strengthening the legal community through mentoring and career development, and we?welcome students, alumni/ae, professors, and professionals to help us fulfill this mission. Our goal is to sponsor and support events that provide insight into African law and culture and into current issues concerning the relationship of Africa to the United States and the rest of the world.

African Leadership and Progress Network

African Leadership and Progress Network African Leadership and Progress Network The African Leadership and Progress Network, Inc. [ALPN] is a nonprofit organization located in Washington, DC, and Abuja, Nigeria. ALPN is a network of African and non-African professionals who are strongly dedicated to utilizing innovative and entrepreneurial approaches for fostering rapid progress in Africa. Our mission is to help bring about faster private sector-driven economic growth and poverty alleviation in African countries through various initiatives that are rooted in knowledge and information. ALPN?s activities involve education, training, research, analysis, information dissemination, networking, and advocacy in several areas: Leadership & governance; Leadership capacity development; US policy; The African investment environment; Foreign & domestic investment and capital flows; Regional integration, NEPAD, the African Union, etc.; Harnessing and transfer of knowledge/intellectual capital and technology; Development of leadership and professional networks.

African Leadership and Progress Network

African Leadership and Progress Network African Leadership and Progress Network African Leadership and Progress Network is ....

African Legacy: Helping Set The Record Straight About Africa

African Legacy: Helping Set The Record Straight About Africa African Legacy: Helping Set The Record Straight About Africa African Legacy: Helping Set The Record Straight About Africa is ...

African Literature Association (ALA)

African Literature Association, ALA African Literature Association (ALA) Mission: The African Literature Association (ALA) is an independent non-profit professional society open to scholars, teachers and writers from every country. It exists primarily to facilitate the attempts of a world-wide audience to appreciate the efforts of African writers and artists. The organization welcomes the participation of all who produce the object of our study and hopes for a constructive interaction between scholars and artists. The ALA as an organization affirms the primacy of the African peoples in shaping the future of African literature and actively supports the African peoples in their struggle for liberation.

African Literature on the Internet

African Literature on the Internet African Literature on the Internet Database about African Literature on the Internet

African Mathematical Union

African Mathematical Union African Mathematical Union The A.M.U. Commission on the History of Mathematics in Africa (AMUCHMA), formed in 1986, has the following objectives: a. to improve communication among those interested in the history of mathematics in Africa; b. to promote active cooperation between historians, mathematicians, archaeologists, ethnographers, sociologists, etc., doing research in, or related to, the history of mathematics in Africa; c. to promote research in the history of mathematics in Africa, and the publication of its results, in order to contribute to the demystification of the still-dominant Eurocentric bias in the historiography of mathematics; d. to cooperate with any and all organizations pursuing similar objectives.

African Medical Association

African Medical Association, AfMA African Medical Association AfMA was established in 2004 and currently involves the following countries: Angola, Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, Swaziland, Seychelles, Zambia, Zimbabwe. Ultimately it is envisaged that all the countries and customs territories of Africa will be members of AfMA. History The physicians of Africa have for a long time expressed the need to have a representative body to act as its collective voice and to advocate for better health care for the people of the continent. It was recognised that there was a compelling need to establish an Africa structure of national medical associations that could organise health issues in the Africa region and participate actively in world health issues. Early in 2005, a group of dedicated medical leaders took the lead in realising this dream. The establishment of AfMA can be summarised as follows: In January 2005, medical leaders of nine African countries met in South Africa to discuss the establishment of a regional office of the World Medical Association (WMA). They agreed that health leadership in Africa should join forces to address common health problems of the continent and to play a strong advocacy role for the region at an international level. All participating countries signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which provided a broad framework of the organisation's activities. A legal entity (an Article 21 not-for-profit organisation registered in South Africa) has been registered to accommodate the establishment of AfMA. In July 2006, leaders from 11 African nations attended the first inaugural general meeting in South Africa to further develop and implement the activities of what is now known as the "Africa Medical Association (AfMA)". The official office-bearers were elected to serve until 2010. The Inaugural General Assembly was held October 2006 in Pilanesberg, South Africa. Countries represented included Namibia, Lesotho, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Ghana, Nigeria, Mozambique and South Africa. Main objectives of AfMA AfMA works for the highest possible standards of ethical behaviour and care by physicians, at all times. While advancing the art and practice of medicine, it also acts as the representative voice for physicians and, where appropriate, patients. It influences policy, launches and participates in projects with the explicit goal of improving health care in Africa. Current Focus Areas Health Security Prevention of HIV / AIDS Strengthening of Health Care Systems The epidemic of chronic disease Human Resources for Health Patient Information & Communication Science & Technology Capacity - Africa Maternal Health Infant Nutrition Access to services, products, devices Leadership Development Capacity-building for NMAs

African Metropolis

African Metropolis African Metropolis A cultural overview of African Diaspora; Africa, Melanesia, Caribbean, North, South & Central America. Visit places, see art, music, literature, culture, get the latest African & African American News, business, Search Engines & Web Site Diagnostics.

African Migration and Development Policy Centre

African Migration and Development Policy Centre, AMADPOC African Migration and Development Policy Centre The African Migration and Development Policy Centre (AMADPOC) is an organisation that aims to undertake and streamline policy-oriented research, training and dialogue on internal as well as international forms of voluntary, forced and irregular migration as they affect and are in turn affected by development within the sub-Saharan Africa and in the region's interrelations with the North and the rest of the South. Recognition of the role and interplay of migration policy and development policy, inter-ethnic relations and other spheres of national as well as international development, intra-regional harmony and inter-regional interdependence within a globalising world in which diversity calls for viable South-North or South-South partnerships. AMADPOC aims to deepen viable international partnerships, embed research in society and build capacity of African countries in the corridors of research institutions, national governments, inter-governmental cooperation with development partners on migration and development issues affecting them individually and in South-North and South-South relations.

African Music

African Music African Music African Music is ...

African Music Encyclopedia

African Music Encyclopedia African Music Encyclopedia About African Music around the globe ?

African Nova Scotians in the Canadian Mosaic

African Nova Scotians in the Canadian Mosaic African Nova Scotians in the Canadian Mosaic The primary purpose of this article is to inform the readers irrespective of their race, ethnicity, religion, geographical location, socio-economic class background and/or political ideology that African Nova Scotians have been in this Canadian province for centuries, and that they have been marginalised and relegated to the lowest socio-economic strata of the society. In this the year of ‘African descendents as declared by the United Nation’, we intend forge ahead to improve the appalling conditions of African Nova Scotians in this country, which we have contributed much to its development. We will no longer accept socio-economic exclusion and marginalization as an accepted way of life for African-Nova Scotians. Remember the Indigenous-Black Community of Nova Scotia, Canada. In 2004, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on racism, Dr. Dou Dou Dienne, in his assessment of the status of African Canadians in the mosaic of Canadian society, inferred that Canada has not recognized the accomplishments and contributions of Blacks in the formation and development of Canada. He succinctly implies that “The history and culture of Black-African Canadian are not woven into the fabric of Canadian society.” He noted also that there is a need to establish programs and strategies to address racism that would not be limited to the mere equalitarian and democratic superimposition of communities. He advocates suggestion that would facilitate interactions, mutual respect, interpersonal and intercommunity awareness, and respect for the contributions made by African Canadians to Canada’s development, and by implication to the expansion of the British Empire. His report inferred that Canada has not come to grip with or accepted its history facts, which is rooted in racial inequality against African Canadians. If Canadians continually ignore this fundamental reality, because it is considered a taboo and damaging to the image of Canada, then the social malignancy would be virtually impossible to address and deal effectively with. This social malignancy of systemic and institutional racism that negatively affect the lives of African Canadians at all levels. Like the proverbial ostrich we keep, our heads bury in the sand to avoid dealing with the reality, and if Canadian politicians, leaders and decision makers do not recognize and address that fact its effects will remain out of reach and irresolvable. In his address to the Commission on Human Rights at the United Nation in Geneva on 23 March 2004, Oscar Brathwaite of the African Canadian Legal Clinic said succinctly that there are many social issues that are damaging to African-Canadian. “Issues such as the continuing legacy on descendants of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, poverty, the criminalisation of Black people, racial profiling, police violence, education rights and media bias reflected the reality of African descendents in Canada, which was one of social exclusion and economic marginalisation. The Special Rapporteur was commended for highlighting the issues relating to the racial discrimination of African Canadians, but a cautionary note on the reliance on the official policy of multiculturalism espoused by the Canadian Government was required. An effective anti-discrimination strategy should include a vigorous anti-racist agenda accompanied by programmes of action designed specifically for African Canadians.”[1] Unbeknownst to most Canadians in general and Nova Scotians in particular, African people were brought to this country (Canada), and they were made slaves to serve the socio-economic interest of the white ruling class. Their social status created socio-economic barriers to them, and for other Blacks/Africans who came later fleeing from the horrors of overt racism and terror of Canada’s southern neighbour. Whether they were free or enslaved, they encountered many hurdles and obstacles towards equal opportunities in this province and country for over two hundred and fifty years. The ‘Black Loyalists’, the Black/African American who fought on the British side in the American war of independence were brought to this country (Nova Scotia) after the American war of independence, and they were promised freedom, land grant and a brighter future in this country. The legacy of that unfulfilled promised still reverberates in the socio-economic exclusion in the society today. We as oppressed and marginalised descendants of that earlier generation in this province (Nova Scotia) must ask ourselves some fundamental questions to ascertain why we are in the present socio-economic and political situation today. For example, did the government of that time fulfilled it’s promises of land grant to the Black Loyalists on equal terms, and was the quality and quantity of land equal to that granted to the White Loyalists? Did this country provide a brighter future for African Canadians? Did Blacks/African-Canadians faced the same kind of racism as in the USA, or was it a more dangerous and insidious form or racism? How has the inequality of that time affected the development of the African Nova Scotian communities today and how it will affect African Nova Scotians-Canadians in the future? Reparation is the latest buzz term that is now added to lexicon of African people worldwide resistance to address the debacles of slavery, colonization and racism. The legacy of that pass is still being manifested in anti Black-African racism in the form of discrimination in the socio-economic areas, business opportunities, pervasive unemployment and underemployment, marginalization, and an over representation of African Nova Scotian youth in the criminal justice system. We as an oppressed people know that it is a taboo to mention racism in the Canadian social lexicon and it more taboo to even hint that the enslavement of Africans in Canada is a part of the country’s history. White Canadians like to assume that those two anomalies racism and slavery are the realities of Canada’s southern neighbour (USA), but definitely not in Canada. How can anyone be so presumptuous to label this country with such barbarous act, after all, this country gave refuse to Africans fleeing from the USA using the tremulous journey on the infamous underground railroad to freedom in the snowy north. The effects of this oppressive legacy are felt to this day and contemporary human rights violations in Nova Scotia provide clear examples of the pervasiveness of racism in Canadian society. The roots of racism are buried deep in historical patterns of race based exploitation and marginalization. A cursory reading of the media will show that there are still acts of aggression including attacks against African Nova Scotian institutions and individuals. The history of Black/African people in Canada is far more complex than it appears on the surface through the media, where it is sanitize to reflect a harmonious racial compassionate image if Canada. In contrast to the intentions of white colonizers who came to pillage, rape, enslave and destroy, the oral history of Indigenous-Black/African Nova Scotians attests to the arrival of African Peoples traveling the North Atlantic to share resources and knowledge. In one documented example, Black/African explorer Mathieu Da Costa was the interpreter and navigator for Pierre Dugua de Monts and Samuel de Champlain in the early 17th century. This suggests that free Africans traveled the Atlantic and settled there long before the aforementioned white Europeans. However, the narrative of black subjugation has overwritten these examples in the Canadian mainstream education system. This and the many other misconception and myths must be debunked and rectify. Africa Canadians will and must continue to established and develop and strengthen institution that will foster new paradigms in the education of Black-African Nova Scotians-Canadians. For example, organizations in the form of the Nova Scotia Black Education Association (NSBEA), Council on African Canadian Education (CASE), The Nova Scotia Africentric Summer Learning Institute (ASLI); The African Canadian Services Division (ACSD). These institutions will empower the African Nova Scotia learners and the youth across the learning and education continuum. In Nova Scotia, we are aware that our very survival in this potentially hostile environment is preparing African Nova Scotian youth of today for the challenges of tomorrow. The unemployment rate among Black/African Nova Scotians is endemic and very dangerous. It creates a myriad of social pathologies, resulting in our youth over representation in the criminal justice system, and the expansion of the prison industrial complex, which may be making some entrepreneurs richer and more powerful at the expense of Black/African people. Therefore, we have to establish, develop and strengthen enterprises and businesses that will provide much better business, employment and career opportunities for African Nova Scotians. The Black Business Initiative (BBI) is one example in Nova Scotia, and the Black Business and Professional Association in Ontario is another. To move forward it is very important that in Nova Scotia we establish and build alliances within and beyond the local and provincial jurisdictions. It is necessary to establish ties and working relationships nationally and internationally. This approach would aid in capacity building. For example, Sixth Regional Diaspora Caucus (SRDC) is an organization that is involved with the Africa Union (AU). That great Pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey said, “We as a people are responsible for our own advancement, because no other racial group will do it for us”. Perhaps one of the major errors that has been made in the pass is we placed our welfare in the hands of other racial groups. Nova Scotia was home to 47 Black owned communities. In stark contrast to the white empire loyalists, our ancestors of African origin were permitted entry into Canada solely on the basis that they provide advantageous protection and development for the betterment of Canada. Once the battles were fought and the mission accomplished or completed, Britain’s rule and expansion was secured, all deals were off. Where are the land grants that we were promised in 1783? Is it too late to rekindle that fire, in this year of the UN declaration of the year of African Descendants for us to demand immediate redress for the Black Loyalists Land Grants to be settled? Although Blacks kept their end of the bargain, the promises made to them by the British were mostly abandoned. Britain and your proxy Canada we the descendants of those who you deceived are now demanding that you redress the imbalance of two hundred an twenty-five years of injustice and the dreams that were deferred. We were given the worst land that was unsustainable, ensuring that the status quo remains, that is cheap available labour to the powerful white oligarch. Where is the justice? We are demanding justice! Despite the harsh terrain comprised of mostly bedrock, Blacks were able to cultivate and settle the Halifax areas of Africville, East and North Preston, Hammonds Plains, Beechville, Porter’s Lake, Cherrybrook, Lakeloon, and the Lucasville Road, as well as the Windsor area. Today, only 43 Black Communities remain throughout the province of Nova Scotia; a strong indicator that the Indigenous-Black Community is decreasing.[2] There is no community of People in Canada, perhaps that are not many Indigenous/black Canadian in comparison to the Indigenous-Black Nova Scotians. Above all, the contribution of our settlement to the benefit of Nova Scotian and Canadian society must be borne in mind. Although Canada is rich in Black history and accomplishments, most Canadians (let alone the global community) are not aware that Black People’s ancestry and enslavement in Canada predated and continued beyond Confederation (1867). Black People’s history and contributions to the establishment of Canada have yet to be incorporated into Canada’s national museums of history. Our oral history, despite its legitimacy, is marginalized and treated as inconsequential, and at times even dismissed as dreaming. History from a white Eurocentric (supremacist) perspective places white Europeans as the only explorers to Atlantic Canada, and Black people as their slaves. It must be emphasized that there is a desperate need for a radical paradigm shift in the education of all students in general and African Nova Scotians-Canadians students in particular. Remember one of those clarion calls made by that great leader Marcus Garvey concerning the issue of education ”Negroes, teach your children that they are direct descendants of the greatest and proudest race who ever peopled the earth; and it is because of the fear of our return to power, in a civilization of our own, that may outshine others, why we are hated”[3] I should also add the wisdom of another great African American Scholar who advocated for our advancement through the kind of education as one of the pathways that will guide us in the right direction to free our mind from mental slavery and liberate Africa and Africans from all form of entrapments and oppression by our forced state of mind. “If you can control a man’s thinking, you don’t have to worry about his actions. If you can determine what a man thinks, you do not have to worry about what he will do. If you can make a man believe that, he is inferior, you do not have to compel him to seek an inferior status, and he will do so without being told”[4] Our unique cultural characteristics were intricately shaped by refugee slaves from the Southern United States, skilled workers from Barbados and Trinidad, master carpenters from Great Britain, Maroons from Jamaica, and free African explorers. Our distinct history is one of overcoming more than 400 hundreds of years of betrayal, neglect, and systemic racism.[5] I would be remised if I did not mention the debacle of Africville, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the force removal that was executed by the white overlords who treated the residents worst than discarded garbage. A brief synopsis of Africville a black/African Nova Scotian community: Over its 120-year history, perhaps 90 to 100% Blacks with a few white families, permanent residents and transients. At its peak, Africville had perhaps 400 residents. It was a small, self-contained, tight-knit Black community within the city limits of Halifax, Nova Scotia. At its peak, just before World War I, it was made up of approximately 80 families / 300 residents. Located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in the northern edge of the Halifax peninsula, beside the Bedford Basin. 1830s – 1970. Developed slowly after the War of 1812, grew after the American Civil War, thrived from the 1890s to the 1920s. Endured a bad phase during the Depression; rebounded during the late 1930s and after World War II. During the 1950s, it began a slow downturn until the late 1960s. Relocation occurred between 1964 and 1967. The last house was bulldozed January 2, 1970. The controversy following the relocation, the spirit of the former residents, and the fact that it was a unique community has made Africville a national and international legend –- a lost community gone forever. It is also an enduring symbol of racial intolerance, the myth of urban renewal, and the value of community culture.[6] In conclusion, I believe that the Black/African readers will be able to identify with the issues, challenges and problems that African-Nova Scotians encounter in their daily lives in this part of Canada. It is identifiable; because this is the reality of the Black people/Africans experience, any place in the world where Euro-centrism is the dominant determinant. In this the year of African descendents as declared by the United Nation, we must reverse this trend through collaboration, cooperation, unity and the resolve to make this decade the decade of self determination and monumental advancement locally, nationally and internationally. We as African-Nova Scotian resolve to chart a new and more assertive course in this decade to guarantee our advancement and provide a brighter future for our descendents in this country. Lastly, do remember that united we stand together against all foes-enemies, because divided we will fall and be trampled upon. We intend to build a solid foundation, and SRDC could be that corner stone. Forward ever, backward never. [1] United Nations, Press Release, Commission on Human Rights 23 March 2004 Independent Expert, Chairperson-Rapporteur of Working Group, on Right to Development Present Reports. 2 Map of Black Communities (Black Culture Centre – _ HYPERLINK “http://bccns.com/”http://bccns.com/_) 3 “Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey” 4 Carter. G. Woodson, “The Mis-education of the Negro” 5 For a comprehensive history of People of African decent in Nova Scotia, Canada, please visit the BlackCulture Centre Website at – http://bccns.com 6 (http://www.dacosta400.ca/cavalcade/africville.shtml); Africville: Canada’s Most Famous Black/African Canadian Community.

African Philosophy Resources

African Philosophy Resources, african diaspora African Philosophy Resources There are many African studies pages currently on the WWW. This one starts from African philosophy, and organizes other useful resources to support this area of research. African philosophy is a field in development, and there is not always agreement on what should be included. That ambiguity is unapologetically evident on this page. I am taking my cue from a body of literature and discussion among academic philosophers, but this does not necessarily mean that what has not yet caught the attention of academics is not philosophically interesting. As well, you may notice that I include philosophy which focusses on Africa, philosophy done in Africa, and philosophy that is part of the traditional conversation among African philosophers. The African philosophical community has not managed to distinguish between these, or finally rule out any of them, and I will not either. The important thing is to further conversation among and between African philosophers, and the academic world in general. So, I hope you find something useful on this page, to further this goal. In some cases, I have made entries without having URLs to link to. This is as much a wish-list as anything, and hopefully eventually all wishes will be granted. If you can help with the content of this list, please get in touch with me at the mailing address below or at the bottom of the page. Resources are available on: Table Of Contents African American Resources African Philosophers Associations Bibliographies Conferences Email Discussion Lists Introductions and Guides Journals Publishers Teaching Resources Libraries, Periodical Indexes & Databases Documents: Books Documents: Papers Documents: Reviews Documents: Popular Press Documents: Other Topics: Afrocentrism Topics: Ancient Africa Topics: Art in Africa Topics: Gender Topics: Indigenous Knowledge Topics: Literature Topics: PanAfricanism Topics: Politics Topics: Race Topics: Religion Topics:Miscellaneous General Resources on Africa Humanitarian Sites Post-Secondary Education Journalism on Africa African Places Intercultural Philosophy Philosophy in the World's Religions

African Professionals Network

African Professionals Network African Professionals Network 1 - History of AfriPRO: Since inception in December 2002, with our fist event in Newark, NJ in April 2003, as the Nigeria Professional Network (NiPRO), one of our core missions then as it is now was to make accessible the vast talent pool of Young Nigeria Professionals in the Diaspora to Nigeria. However, since then the scope of our mission has broaden and has grown to include not just Nigerians, but all Africans in the Diaspora, people of African dissent and friends of African. As a 501(c)(6) organization, with chapters across the United States and chapters in Nigeria, United Kingdom and Canada; we are determine to promote & seek the interest of our members and most of all, get Africans in the Diaspora actively involve in the advancement of Africa through our various programs and initiatives. 2 - About AfriPRO: The African professional network, AfriPRO, is a worldwide network of motivated and dedicated young African professionals at home and in the diaspora, working together to build a prosperous, united and stronger Africa for now and the future. 3 - Vision: The vision of the African professional network is to build a new African powerhouse whose people are prosperous, wealthy, united and self-assured. 4 - Mission: AfriPRO is an organisation that serves to motivate its network of young African professionals and people of African descent to build a new Africa. We are also dedicated to the advancement of Africans worldwide. 5 - Objectives: Address the economic, financial, political, professional, social and cultural issues that affect young African professionals today. Build a network of young African professionals worldwide. Create an avenue to highlight and showcase the vast talents and contributions of Africans worldwide. Foster a Traveler's Philanthropy in Africa, an initiative that enables professionals lend their expertise while visiting Africa. Initiate community development efforts where African professionals in the Diaspora embark on various missions to lend their professional expertise and help develop communities in Africa. Motivate young Africans to join the mission of rebuilding Africa with their expertise and resources. Organize seminars, symposia and workshops to enhance the professional, economic and social development of Africans.

African Professionals of Australia

African Professionals of Australia African Professionals of Australia African Professionals of Australia aims to inspire all Australians of African origin who are motivated to excel in a professional capacity, from tertiary study to professional employment and self-employment. It aims to uplift the professional profile of Africans in Australia in the workplace, business, place of study and in the community. It also promotes networks between African professionals and other community-based organisations. The African Professionals of Australia (APA) is one of the largest African organisations in Australia with a current membership of over 500. Founded in 2007, APA now includes members from more than 20 African countries including Ghana, Uganda, Congo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania, Somali, South Africa, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Nigeria Mauritania, Gambia, Seychelles, Chad and Sudan. APA?s membership is represented by 15 different professions including Accountants, Medical doctors, Nurses, Human Resource Managers, IT, Engineers, Geologists, Business Development Managers, Lawyers, Teachers, Welfare officers, Community workers and Scientists. The African Professionals of Australia (APA) is a not-for-profit organisation whose purpose is to empower professionals of African origin to reach their full potential in their respective professions. This includes providing a platform to pursue and achieve continued professional relevance and impact to the Australian community at large. APA is governed by the Australian Corporations Act 2001, owned and managed by its members. As a community body, APA has resolved to strategically employ the power of creativity, teamwork and the diversity of its membership and ethnic background to drive the organisation?s vision and achieve its set out-goals. The organisation is dedicated to the personal and professional success of African-Australian professionals and has in place several programs and initiatives aimed towards maximum utilisation of available resources to achieve its intended objectives. APA offers its members leadership training, professional development, mentoring opportunities, career placement services and more.

African Professionals of Australia (APA)

African Professionals of Australia, APA African Professionals of Australia (APA) African Professionals of Australia aims to inspire all Australians of African origin who are motivated to excel in a professional capacity, from tertiary study to professional employment and self-employment. It aims to uplift the professional profile of Africans in Australia in the workplace, business, place of study and in the community. It also promotes networks between African professionals and other community-based organisations.

African Publishers Network (APNET)

African Publishers Network, APNET African Publishers Network (APNET) Zimbabwe reads is a collaborative effort of Zimbabweans and international friends who are encouraging a culture of reading by providing materials and access to information.

African Restaurants

African Restaurants African Restaurants DIRECTORY OF RESTAURANTS SERVING AFRICAN CUISINE In the summer of 1989 I began the compliation of a directory of restaurants which serve African cuisine but which are located outside the continent of Africa. It is hoped that such a directory will be found useful to a number of different audiences, among which are the following: diners wishing to become acquainted with African cuisines and cultures; students of African cultures, societies, institutions, and languages; and Africans and Africanists transplanted to new environments who wish to maintain culinary links with past experience. No further source material being directly available, I am posting the directory as compiled as of this date. The directory comes in five parts, respectively containing (apart from each header) 261, 1558, 2640, 226, and 1498 lines. It is unformatted, with a line-record-length of 72. You may want to reformat it before printing according to your own requirements. Because of the nature of the source material, there remains much uncertainty concerning the cuisines of (and other information about) the restaurants listed. The directory identifies 223 restaurants as serving African cuisine, 119 probably serving African cuisine, and 690 possibly serving African cuisine. Readers are requested and encouraged to contact listed restaurants in their local areas for missing and/or additional information (see the section "Call for Additional Information" in the first part). Please send your electronic contributions either to me directly or to the network, as you see fit, for inclusion in the next edition of the directory. Thank you. The directory is a copyrighted work. However, it may be freely copied by individuals and nonprofit organizations if used solely for noncommercial purposes. Printed copies of the directory may be obtained by post from the Center for Applied Research in African Languages for the cost of printing and postage. See the section "Availability" in the first part for further details.

African Scientific and Academic Network

African Scientific and Academic Network African Scientific and Academic Network African Scientific and Academic Network (1) rejects the use of the term " BRAIN DRAIN?; instead it will use?? "BRAIN MISMANAGEMENT". (2) ASAN believes that there is no such thing as "AFRICAN DIASPORA". AFRICA IS WHERE AFRICANS ARE. Therefore Africans will contribute to the development of their continent at any time from any where ?

African Scientific Institute

African Scientific Institute, ASI African Scientific Institute The African Scientific Institute (ASI) was founded in 1967. It is a non-profit organization representing a network of scientists, engineers, technologists, and health professionals, as well as young people aspiring to enter the world of science and technology. ASI is striving to get more minorities to pursue careers in science and technology. We believe that our network of resources, which includes informed technical professionals, has an obligation to interact with the community. Through various programs sponsored by ASI, young people have an opportunity to learn about the possibilities and rewards of a profession in science, engineering, technology, mathematics, and graphic design. More About ASI

African Scientific Institute (ASI)

African Scientific Institute, ASI African Scientific Institute (ASI) The African Scientific Institute inspires young people to pursue careers in science and technology, while simultaneously representing an interdisciplinary network of scientist, engineers, technologists, health professionals, and mathematicians. ASI provides resources and a forum for the exchange of technical information, expertise and professional development. We believe that with all of our resources, we have a particular obligation to the youth in our community. Through various programs sponsored by ASI, young people have an opportunity to learn about the possibilities and rewards of a technical profession.

African Scottish Development Association (ASDO)

African Scottish Development Association, ASDO African Scottish Development Association (ASDO) ASDO is an African initiated and African led organisation for the development of Africans in the developing and developed world.ASDO will work directly with registered grass root organisations in developing world and Africans in diasporas to develop in the areas of health, education and culture. Mission: To raise awareness and mobilise resources on issues affecting development of Africans and to work in collaboration with grass root organisations to ensure Africans reach their full development potential.

African Services Committee

African Services Committee African Services Committee Our Mission: Founded in 1981 by Ethiopian refugees to give a helping hand to other newcomers, today African Services is a multiservice agency based in Harlem and dedicated to assisting immigrants, refugees and asylees from across the African Diaspora. Our programs address the needs of newcomers affected by war, persecution, poverty, and global health inequalities. We provide health, housing, legal, educational, and social services to 10,000 people each year. Staff representing more than 20 countries and speaking over 25 languages provide culturally and linguistically relevant support to this diverse and growing community. Expanding HIV prevention and access to AIDS treatment and care is central to our mission. African Services has taken this work from Harlem to the frontlines of the global pandemic and now operates four HIV clinics in Ethiopia. We are committed to challenging stigma and discrimination at all levels and supporting individuals, families and communities most impacted by AIDS. Combined with life-saving treatment, this care and support has transformed thousands of lives.

African Singles at the Quincy Beach Meetup Group.

African Singles at the Quincy Beach Meetup Group, African Singles in the Diaspora African Singles at the Quincy Beach Meetup Group. The warm weather is here and it’s time to go to the beach. Let’s meet at the beach for social fun and smell the salty ocean water together. We can discuss if we want to engage in some form of activity when at the beach. Suggestions are welcome. This group is for members ages 35 - 55. We're about: Fitness · Singles · Black Professionals · Social Networking · Beach · Outdoors · Fun Times · Black Singles · Exercise · African Professionals · African Americans · African Culture · Black Men · African Diaspora · Friends of Africa.

African Sisters in Diaspora

African Sisters in Diaspora African Sisters in Diaspora This is group is specifically for young African women 20 - 30. Which African country were you born? Is it Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya?This group is a place to meet up, hang out. Whether it be for food and drinks. We can hang out in our homes and talk about African music, culture, food...I love egusi soup and jollof rice...living in the U.S, St. Louis, whatever. This is a place to talk everything Africa or America. Let's have some fun! We're about: African Music · African Americans · African American Women · Women's Social · Performing Arts · Eating, Drinking, Talking, Laughing, Etc · African Professionals · Sisterhood · African Culture · Nigerian Professionals · African Diaspora · young black professionals · Nigerian culture · Nigerians · Africans

African Student’s Association (ASA)

African Student’s Association, ASA African Student’s Association (ASA) The African Student’s Association (ASA) is an organization that addresses the cultural, political, and social aspects of African continent. We accomplish this by discussion of current events and topics, through our general bi-monthly meetings, ASA Dance Troupe, African Choir, and other events such as Taste of Africa. The African Students' Association aims to be a social forum for all students of African descent as well as all students who are interested in sharing the African experience at CU-Boulder.

African Students Association (ASA) at Texas A&M University

African Students Association at Texas A&M University, African Students Association, african diaspora African Students Association (ASA) at Texas A&M University Mission The African Students Association (ASA) at Texas A&M University is a student-run socio-cultural organization. ASA strives to foster a culturally diverse environment and increase unity among all students. History The African Students Association was founded in 1984 by a group of Nigerian graduate students at Texas A&M University and has matured into a leading cultural organization on campus. ASA is closely affiliated with other African and black student organizations in Texas A&M and colleges across the nation. This year’s executive team has a flaming spirit, dedication and the enthusiasm to elevate ASA to great heights. Objectives The primary objectives of the African Students Association are: To promote a greater understanding of African traditions and increase unity among students attending Texas A&M University regardless of race, ethnicity or religion. To encourage and support cultural, academic, social and athletic activities at Texas A&M University. To stimulate interaction among African students and the society at large. To welcome and assist incoming African students to TAMU in cooperation with the Office of International Students Services. To create opportunities where members can give back to the Texas A&M community through volunteering. ASA works closely with other organizations such as the National African Students’ Association, staff and faculty on campus and is recognized as a reputable cultural organization.

African Students Association ASA

African Students Association, ASA African Students Association ASA African Student Association (ASA is a multicultural student group at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Our mission is to promote cultural and social awareness of African students amongst the entire student body and faculty of our university. We work to facilitate better communication and understanding between African students and other members of the university community, while encouraging activities that portray the noble cultural treasures of the African continent. Anybody and everybody is welcome to become a member. People can join ASA for many reasons including, making new friends, making a difference by helping children and schools in Africa, and of course learning the rich and colorful cultures of Africa, just to mention a few.

African Students Association at the University of Massachusetts

African Students Association at the University of Massachusetts, African Students Association African Students Association at the University of Massachusetts The African Students Association (ASA) is a dynamic group of students, mostly africans, who undertake various activities including talks and cultural events with the goal of promoting awareness of the rich African culture and people. We hope to use this site to further our goals by providing interesting content on the African continent and people, as well as our provide information on our events. You will find links to other ASA sites in the country, as well as links to African countries and organizations. Please feel free to explore any area on this site and do not hesitate to contact the webmaster, or the members of this group - african@stuaf.umass.edu. Thank you. We have general elections for our executive board once a year and each new president has specific goals they will like to accomplish in their one year of office. Click here to find out who the new board for the African Students Association are and what the president has in stock for the year. The ASA consists of about 60 people and these include graduate students and african faculty. Most of our members either grew up or spent considerable amount of time in Africa and thus are very well educated in the cultures of most african countries. So if you have some general questions concerning the African culture, or you are curious about some african dish you had on one of our events, etc., feel free to ask our public relations committee and they will be glad to help. Alternatively you could use our feedback and questions form below to contact us. Feel free to check out our member page for a list of our members and where they are from. Most of the names are usually linked to their web pages, profile or email addresses.

African Students Association at Columbia University, New York

African Students Association at Columbia University, New York African Students Association at Columbia University, New York The purpose of the African Students Association is to provide a forum for the meaningful discussion of the political, social, and cultural landscape of Africa. We aim to create a culturally enlightened community on campus by educating people about Africa. We welcome all people interested in Africa and African issues.?

African Students Association at Johns Hopkins

African Students Association at Johns Hopkins African Students Association at Johns Hopkins The African Students Association (ASA) of the Johns Hopkins University comprises a group of students of African and non-African decent dedicated to the education of the Hopkins community at large of the different cultures that comprise the African continent. ASA also provides a network of support for African students at Johns Hopkins. The African Students Association is a service as well as social organization which aims to rid misconceptions concerning Africa through education.

African Students Association at Oberlin College - USA

African Students Association at Oberlin College, African Students Association African Students Association at Oberlin College - USA Purpose of the African Students Association to enhance and sustain unity among Africans in Oberlin to coordinate African students' campus activities; to act as a coalition-builider with other campus organizations; to actively participate in the National African Students' Association; to identify and promote African cultures and to encourage participation in the development and affairs of the African continent. ASA also strives to enhance education by providing a network for prospective African students abroad and in the United States, communicating and cooperating with other organizations of the African Diaspora, and approaching colleges , universities and scholarship foundations for merit scholarships for African students.

African Students Association at the Pennsylvania State University

African Students Association at the Pennsylvania State University, african diaspora African Students Association at the Pennsylvania State University The African Students Association (ASA) was chartered in the Pennsylvania State University on February 3, 1969. Its mission has been to foster a fraternal relationship and a better understanding among fellow Africans. It also protects the African image in American society through social and cultural activities. Mission Statement To unite sons and daughters of the Motherland and all those concerned with its welfare. Through constructive student engagement we will foster a better understanding of each other and the issues affecting Africa. The African Students Association aims to work as a unified body to build relationships with the administration of Penn State, fellow student organizations, and the Penn State Community. By doing so we will be able to effectively communicate ideas and information, which will help in the facilitation of our chapter’s goals on local, national, and international levels Membership Everyone is eligible to join. Membership is recognized by paying a $20 fee per academic year, so as to fund our events that will make our year great!

African Students Association at Truman State University

African Students Association at Truman State University, diaspora africaine African Students Association at Truman State University The African Students Association (ASA) is a group of students at Truman State University (T.S.U) of African and non African decent who are dedicated in their common goal to act as resources of information on Africa, promote African issues on Campus and create an awareness of Africa by encouraging the positive interaction between its members and students of African decent and their campus and community. It is a service and social association. ASA consists of about 25 student members as well as faculty. These members have spent a considerable amount of time in Africa or are really interested in the continent. These people have been in close contact with various cultures of the continent and can therefore answer any questions you have. Please click here to see a list of our members and the countries they are represent. ELIGIBILITY OF MEMBERSHIP All students at TSU are eligible for membership. All ASA Alumni are eligible for membership. African Students are strongly encouraged to join. See our page listing of Association members, Officers and Committee Heads. Our Objectives Bring awareness of African issues to TSU it’s surrounding community Act as a resource of information on Africa To help rid misconceptions on/about Africa Act as a support group for African students at T.S.U Encourage positive interaction between African students and the Truman community WHAT SERVICES DOES ASA PROVIDE Assist lecturers, clubs, groups, organizations or events by providing information on specific countries from individual members who are citizens of that country or those who have connections with particular countries. This includes music, artwork, literature, historical and social information. For a list of countries represented on campus see our members page. Provide assistance to students seeking information onspecific countries. For quick access to information see our page for links to Information on African countries. Participate or support other student or non-student organizations on Campus or in the community Provide student speakers for lecturers,organizations or events

African Students Association of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

African Students Association of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, african diaspora African Students Association of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology We are … the African Students Association of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, otherwise known as the MIT Africans an organization bringing African culture to the MIT community fostering a community of students with an interest in African culture and issues diverse and cohesive representing nations such as Ghana, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe as well as United States, Brazil and England We aim to … be a learning environment for those interested in African culture and issues increase awareness about Africa and African issues among MIT students showcase the various aspects of African culture such as way of life, food, music, clothing, beauty present Africa from the African perspective We … organize events that promote African culture and community among our members involve ourselves in MIT activities such as intramural sports and the International Fair assist members new to MIT adjust to the MIT work atmosphere and lifestyle To join … attend one of our meetings or e-mail our webmaster (africans-owner at mit dot edu) to be added to our mailing lists

African Students Organization of Boston College

African Students Organization of Boston College African Students Organization of Boston College The African Students Organization of Boston College is a premier cultural group that strives to introduce the diversity of Africa?s cultures, traditions, customs, and politics to the Boston College community. We are not exclusive or limited to students of African descent but welcome all who have an interest in promoting the diversity of Africa?s richness. We are committed to the recruitment of potential students to Boston College. Our organization also provides support for students of African descent in the form of mentoring with academic and social issues.

African Studies Association

African Studies Association, ASA African Studies Association Established in 1957, the African Studies Association is the flagship membership organization devoted to enhancing the exchange of information about Africa. With almost 2,000 individual and institutional members worldwide, the African Studies Association encourages the production and dissemination of knowledge about Africa, past and present. Based in the United States, the ASA supports understanding of an entire continent in each facet of its political, economic, social, cultural, artistic, scientific, and environmental landscape. Our members include scholars, students, teachers, activists, development professionals, policymakers and donors. Mission The African Studies Association encourages the production and dissemination of historical and contemporary knowledge about Africa. The ASA is based in the United States and aims to cultivate a better understanding of the continent, taking a holistic approach to its areas of focus. This includes all facets of Africa's political, economic, social, cultural, artistic, scientific, and environmental landscapes, to name a few. Our members include scholars, students, teachers, activists, development professionals, policymakers and donors. The ASA achieves its mission by: Providing access to path-breaking research and key debates in African Studies Facilitating interdisciplinary exchanges with African scholars and institutions Publishing high quality research on Africa-related issues Fostering networks of Africanist scholars and practitioners through the Annual Meeting and other forums Addressing the challenges faced by universities engaged in research, teaching and outreach related to Africa Broadening professional opportunities on African issues Promoting a better understanding of Africa through academia, policy-makers, NGOs, media, business, learned societies, and other interested communities

African Studies Association

African Studies Association African Studies Association African Studies Association is a participating member of Aid for Africa, a unique partnership of nonprofit organizations serving families and communities throughout Africa. Established in 1957, the African Studies Association is the flagship membership organization devoted to enhancing the exchange of information about Africa. With almost 2,000 individual and institutional members worldwide, the African Studies Association encourages the production and dissemination of knowledge about Africa, past and present. Based in the United States, the ASA supports understanding of an entire continent in each facet of its political, economic, social, cultural, artistic, scientific, and environmental landscape. Our members include scholars, students, teachers, activists, development professionals, policymakers and donors. (1) Mission: The African Studies Association encourages the production and dissemination of historical and contemporary knowledge about Africa. The ASA is based in the United States and aims to cultivate a better understanding of the continent, taking a holistic approach to its areas of focus. This includes all facets of Africa's political, economic, social, cultural, artistic, scientific, and environmental landscapes, to name a few. Our members include scholars, students, teachers, activists, development professionals, policymakers and donors. (2) The ASA achieves its mission by: Providing access to path-breaking research and key debates in African Studies; Facilitating interdisciplinary exchanges with African scholars and institutions; Publishing high quality research on Africa-related issues; Fostering networks of Africanist scholars and practitioners through the Annual Meeting and other forums; Addressing the challenges faced by universities engaged in research, teaching and outreach related to Africa; Broadening professional opportunities on African issues; Promoting a better understanding of Africa through academia, policy-makers, NGOs, media, business, learned societies, and other interested communities.

African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific

African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific Mission: The African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) is a national network of academics, students, consultants, activists, diplomats, artists, community leaders, and others who share a mutual interest in the promotion of African Studies in Australasia and the Pacific region. AFSAAP was founded in 1978 with the following specific goals that continue to the present: 1. To promote research and teaching of African Studies in Australia and the Pacific. 2. To facilitate contact among scholars and students in the field of African Studies through conferences, regional meetings, and publications. 3. To coordinate African Studies programs and the acquisition of African materials by Australian and Pacific libraries. 4. To serve as the professional body representing Africanists? interests to governments and the community. 5. To contribute towards an understanding of Africa in the community at large. 6. To establish contact with African universities and scholars, other overseas scholars and African Studies associations, and to promote interchanges with them. 7. To publish, distribute and sell the bi-annual peer-reviewed journal ?The Australasian Review of African Studies? and other occasional publications.

African Studies Association of India (ASA)

African Studies Association of India, ASA African Studies Association of India (ASA) African Studies Association of India (ASA)?is an all India apex body of Indian Africanist coming from academics, media, diplomatic services, business and other professions. It is a non profit, non-governmental organization of scholars whose mandate is to ?foster the study, knowledge and understanding of African affairs in India and Indian affairs in Africa? through research and studies. Founded in 2003, the permanent secretariat of the Association is located at Centre for African Studies, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. It has its regional unit at Mumbai, Patiala, Chennai and Kolkata. The Association?s particular strength is in developing multi-disciplinary approach, bringing together the expertise of researchers from the natural, social sciences and humanities on African issues, through major research projects, seminars, workshops, discussion, round table, study groups, conferences, symposia, research colloquia. These programs increase contact and develop synergies between experts who are currently scattered over many departments, institutes and colleges across India. ASA encourages flow of ideas across different disciplines, and provides a base for collaborative projects on African affairs. The Association intends to link up the various African Studies programmes and such Associations all over the world. It has a special emphasis to work as an umbrella organization for African studies scholars in Asia to promote Asian perspective on African affairs to facilitate Afro-Asian cooperation.?ASA has organized several international conferences, symposium and seminars. It publishes books on African Affairs, Indo-African relations and Afro-Asian cooperation. It has?two refereed biannual journals Africa Review?and Insight on Africa. Most of its members have post graduate degree in Social Sciences and humanities with specialization in African affairs. A good number of student members are also there who are pursuing higher studies on Africa.

African Studies Association of the UK

African Studies Association of the UK African Studies Association of the UK The ASAUK is a scholarly organization with a membership that includes academics, journalists and broadcasters, civil servants and many others with an interest in Africa. Members of the ASAUK receive a free subscription to African Affairs, as well as a 10% discount from a wide range of African Studies journals

African Studies Association of the UK (ASAUK)

African Studies Association of the UK, ASAUK African Studies Association of the UK (ASAUK) A major aim of theAfrican Studies Association of the UK (ASAUK) is to facilitate linkages between UK and African institutions, and between scholars in Africa and the UK. We support African scholars publishing in Africanist journals published in the UK, scholarly journal publishing in Africa, scholarly book publishing in Africa, and the exchange of ideas in and about Africa. Our two major programmes, the ASAUK teaching fellowships (see the 2014 call for applications here) and the ASAUK writing workshops are designed to support and strengthen the connections between academics in the UK and their colleagues in Africa. Our aim is also to disseminate information and news to our members about scholarly research in Africa, and to facilitate scholarly initiatives. We encourage early career scholars with an interest in African Studies to undertake the highest quality research and to remain involved in the field. Postgraduate research students registered in the UK are encouraged to join the ASAUK. Africadesk: Jointly managed by the ASAUK and British Academy Africa Panel, the africadesk hosts a directory of Africanists, a directory of African scholars as well as smaller directories of Africanist libraries, centres and journals. The africadesk is a hub, providing information about the expertise and interests of our members.

AFRICAN STUDIES AT COLUMBIA

AFRICAN STUDIES AT COLUMBIA AFRICAN STUDIES AT COLUMBIA AFRICAN STUDIES AT COLUMBIA is A COLLECTION OF ...

African Studies in the West Indies

African Studies in the West Indies, grenada diaspora African Studies in the West Indies From the eighteenth century onwards a handful of the millions of Africans who had been caught up in the Transatlantic slave trade and transported to the Americas began to set down their experiences of enslavement, and of the African societies they had left behind. The writings of individuals such as James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, Ignatius Sancho, Ottobah Cugoano and Olaudah Equiano were among the first to attempt to present the western world with a view of the African continent that was not coloured by racial prejudice or avarice. Thus it can be argued that the origins of the modern discipline of African Studies lie in the black Atlantic world. From that time on, products of the African diaspora from the Caribbean have played a key role in developing both a scholarly understanding and a politicised consciousness of the African continent and its peoples. In the hundred years from the mid-nineteenth century up to mid-twentieth century they included, to name but a few, Edward Wilmot Blyden (Danish West Indies), Henry Sylvester Williams (Trinidad), Marcus Garvey (Jamaica), C.L.R.James (Trinidad), George Padmore (Trinidad), Franz Fanon (Martinique) and Aime; Cesaire (Martinque). Issues of black identity, culture and identification with the African 'motherland' were central to the work of all of these figures. However, the inauguration of African studies as a formal academic discipline in the West Indies had to await the era of decolonisation. In 1948 the University College of the West Indies was established in Jamaica as one of the 'Asquith Colleges'."1 Its curriculum was devised largely in England, and it awarded degrees accredited by the University of London. However, within months of gaining its own charter as a degree-awarding institution in 1962 - finally breaking the colonial link with Britain - steps were being taken at the renamed University of the West Indies (UWI) to develop expertise in African History. In 1963 a brilliant young Guyanese graduate of the UWI named Walter Rodney travelled from Jamaica to study for a doctorate in African history at the School for Oriental and African Studies in London. While at SOAS he completed a doctorate entitled 'A History of the Upper Guinea Coast 1545-1800', supervised by Richard Gray.2 After gaining his doctorate in 1966 his first teaching job was a temporary post at the University College of Dar es Salaam. In his letter of application to Professor T.O.Ranger, then Head of Department at Dar es Salaam, Rodney described the history programme which he had passed through in Jamaica: The History courses... were based on the general pattern of the University of London. There were nine final papers, to be written after three years. Two of these were in English History between 1487 and 1945, and there was a similar arrangement for European History. The West Indies and the Americas accounted for two further courses of the usual kind. 'Reconstruction' after the Civil War in the USA was the special topic which introduced the use of source materials, and this comprised two papers. Finally, there was a translation paper, involving two languages. The course in New World history occasioned a very marginal interest in West Africa, so that I have done most of my reading in that subject since my arrival at the School of Oriental and African Studies in October 1963...3 Of his plans for the future, he wrote: My main commitment is to the University of the West Indies, to which I will return in October 1967 to help start a programme in West African Studies. My interest therefore is in a temporary post ...4 Having completed a year teaching at Dar es Salaam, Rodney duly returned to Jamaica to take up a post at UWI in October 1967. At the same time as he began to develop an academic programme in African history, he also began speaking regularly at public events hosted by members of the Rastafarian community (then in a ferment after the visit of Haile Selassie to Jamaica in April 1966) and a variety of other black consciousness groups. He also gave a series of lectures on Black Power at the Student's Union on the Mona Campus.5 Given the long intellectual tradition of the 'Black Atlantic' of which he was part, it was almost inevitable that Rodney's training as an Africanist should launch him directly into the debates about black identity then raging in Jamaica. However, the politically conservative Jamaican Government became alarmed by the spectre of a radical 'Black Power' movement on its doorstep; in October 1968 it took the opportunity of Rodney's attendance at a Black Writers' Conference in Montreal to bar his re-entry. The move led to riots in Jamaica. After this rebuff, Rodney returned to Dar es Salaam, where he stayed until 1974. During this period he published his most famous work How Europe Underdeveloped Africa (Bogle L'Ouverture Publishers, London,1972). His decision to return to the Caribbean in 1974 had been prompted by an offer of a job as Professor of African History at the University of Guyana. When he arrived in Guyana, however, he found that his appointment had been blocked by the authoritarian Forbes Burnham regime. Rodney stayed on in Guyana to work as a member of the radical opposition to Burnham until he was assassinated by a car bomb in Georgetown, Guyana in 1980. In 1965 Rodney was followed from UWI to SOAS by two other young graduates, Alvin Thompson and Winston McGowan. Both returned to the Caribbean to take up teaching posts at the University of Guyana (in 1969 and 1970 respectively). In 1972 Thompson moved to the Cave Hill Campus of the UWI in Barbados, where he was largely responsible for the development for the undergraduate programme in African history. Building on these foundations, by the end of the 1980s the History Department at Cave Hill included three members with expertise in African History. Aside from these developments in the discipline of history, Caribbean scholars in a variety of other disciplines were developing an interest in African survivals in Caribbean culture during these years. Studies which arose out of this interest included work on African linguistic survivals and religious practices in the Caribbean, as well as African influences on the creative and performing arts, such as Calypso music. Among the central figures in these developments were Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Mervyn Alleyne, Maureen Warner Lewis and Rex Nettleford.6 A key early vehicle for such studies was the African Studies Association of the West Indies formed in Jamaica in 1967 (Walter Rodney served briefly as its treasurer). The Association had a somewhat chequered existence, but published eight issues of its own Bulletin between December 1967 and December 1976. The Bulletin was reborn as the Caribbean Journal of African Studies in 1978, but this seems to have folded not long afterwards.7 More enduringly, a Major in African Studies was established at the UWI's Mona campus as part of its undergraduate programme in the 1970s. Among the more important research projects begun during these years which sought to incorporate work on African-Caribbean connections was the Caribbean Lexicography Project at Cave Hill, under the direction of Richard Allsopp.8 The controversy which had surrounded Rodney and the development of African Studies in Jamaica was echoed in Trinidad when efforts were made to introduce an African Studies programme at the UWI's St Augustine Campus. The pioneer at St Augustine was Fitzroy Baptiste from Grenada, who arrived in Trinidad to join the staff of a unit established to teach African and Asian Studies in October 1968, at the height of student demonstrations to protest Rodney's exclusion from Jamaica. The Unit had been the brainchild of Dr Eric Williams, the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, himself a noted historian.9 Williams hoped that the Unit would engender a spirit of mutual respect among the people of Trinidad and Tobago, the population of which was almost evenly split between people of African and Asian descent. However, in 1970 a 'Black Power Uprising' in Trinidad coincided with a mutiny by members of the Trinidad and Tobago Regiment. In the ensuing State of Emergency, several UWI academics were detained or subjected to harassment, including Baptiste. In the aftermath of these events, according to Baptiste, Williams and his party, The People's National Movement (PNM), had a concern lest the search for identity by the African and Asian components in newly independent Trinidad and Tobago might end up in what [Williams] termed 'Mother Africa' and 'Mother India' and, thereby, detract from the goal of nation-building. 10 Against this background, Williams established an Education Commission to review the schools curriculum in Trinidad and Tobago, and especially to advise on the future role of 'Afro-Asian Studies'. The Commission recommended the inclusion of 'Afro-Asian Studies' in the curriculum for both Junior and Senior Secondary Schools; however, it specified that the overall aim should be, 'to use Afro-Asian Studies and cultural forms to foster an appreciation for our national unity and not to produce divisions'11. In these circumstances, the teaching of African and Asian Studies at St Augustine was left in an ambiguous position and was starved of resources for much of the next two decades. Eventually, the Unit was broken up in the early 1990s, with the history courses being subsumed into the History Department and other aspects of the programme being taken over by other departments. Subsequently the Asian' component faired somewhat better than the 'African' component because the local Indian community and the Government of India provided funds both for a Visiting Professor of Indian Studies and a lectureship in Hindi. No similar resources were forthcoming for African Studies. Nevertheless, the Campus continues to offer an undergraduate Major in African and Asian Studies. Nothing has been said in this brief review so far about the state of African Studies in the non-Anglophone Caribbean. This is partly due to a lack of information on my part, but also reflects what appears to be a relative under-development of African Studies in the French and Spanish-speaking parts of the region. Currently, for example, there are no courses in African History offered at the University of Puerto Rico or at the Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane (in Martinique). Cuba, of course, with its history of direct linkages with African states since the Revolution is an outstanding exception to this relative dearth of interest, and could be the subject of an article in its own right. While the battle to develop African Studies as an academic discipline was continuing within the walls of academe in the Anglophone Caribbean during the 1970s and 1980s, popular sentiment on African issues focused primarily on the dramatic struggle against apartheid in South Africa. West Indians were drawn directly into this issue by the international controversy over sanctions, and especially by the question of a cricketing boycott of South Africa. Radical Pan-Africanists throughout the West Indies rallied around their support for a boycott, and waged a vocal campaign in support of sanctions. As a spin off from this campaign, efforts continued to educate the public in the Caribbean about the region's African heritage, and to promote a sense of connection with the African continent. These efforts ranged from lecture series and workshops to cultural events. In the 1990s, after the end of the apartheid era, interest in Africa was sustained in the Caribbean through continuing campaigns by people of African descent to bolster a sense of African identity and to promote African advancement in the face of a global environment that was perceived to be hostile to these goals. In Barbados, for example, the Government has recently established a Pan African Affairs Commission, with a brief to develop practical links with the African continent and educate the Barbadian public about its African heritage. There are also moves afoot in Barbados to develop African Studies in Schools. These wider efforts at consciousness raising have ensured that African Studies options at UWI remain popular among students. The controversies over African Studies in the West Indies have had at least one lasting effect. It is now widely accepted both at the academic and the popular levels in Caribbean society that an interest in, and study of, aspects of African culture must be embedded in any credible programme of Caribbean Studies. This was not generally so in the 1960s or 1970s. This means that the study of Caribbean literature or Caribbean linguistics, for example, can scarcely proceed without reference to African influences. The result is that it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify a clear dividing line between African and Caribbean Studies; indeed, many African-Caribbean scholars would probably deny that such a dividing line exists. This convergence is also reflected in the growing interest among Caribbean scholars in the hybrid discipline of 'Diaspora Studies'. In conclusion, in reviewing the highly charged and politicised debates about African Studies in the Caribbean over the past thirty years, one over-arching theme stands out. When independence came to the Caribbean in the 1960s, key issues of consciousness and identity among Caribbean people remained unresolved. Indeed, it is an open question as to whether they have been resolved even now. Looking to the future, in the current globalised context new approaches, as well as renewed effort, are required if the continuing interest among Caribbean people in the study of Africa is to be developed in meaningful ways.

African Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin

African Studies Program, University of Wisconsin African Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin The African Studies Program supports research, teaching, and outreach at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, bringing together scholars in multiple disciplines, students, teachers, and community partners to consider all aspects of land and life in Africa. The African Studies Program is a U. S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center for Africa, a unit in the College of Letters and Science, and a member of the campus consortium of internationally oriented programs known as the International Institute.

African Study Center at University of Pennsylvania

African Study Center at University of Pennsylvania, african diaspora African Study Center at University of Pennsylvania Everything about African countries: Map of Africa National Holidays USA Travel Warnings

African Swedish National Association

African Swedish National Association African Swedish National Association African Swedish National Association, ASR, is a religious and unpolitical non-profit organization founded in 1990. We work for equality and to raise issues relating to the African-Swedish minority. In our businesses together Afro-Swedes with a background in Africa and the African Diaspora. African Swedish National Association operates and works for equality and equal rights. We turn to the Afro-Swedes with a background in Africa and in the African diaspora. And we need you in our work!

African Teachers Association-USA (ATA)

African Teachers Association-USA, ATA African Teachers Association-USA (ATA) African Teachers’ Association, Inc hereafter referred as Africateachers is a not-for-profit organization ensuring and promoting quality education through supervision, training and empowerment of African teachers. Africateachers is committed to work with school districts, teachers union and all educational stakeholders in order to ensure students achievement irrespective of their backgrounds, race and socioeconomic status. The organization: This organization was founded in April 2011 by a group of African educators who recognized the vital role of teachers and the importance of diversity in nation-building and development through a responsible and literate citizenry. 1.1 Objectives Africateachers is established to bring together and unite all African teachers and educators in the United States into relations of mutual assistance and cooperation; to promote the welfare of students by providing better educational opportunities regardless of race, color, creed, sex, and social and political status. Finally, Africateachers seeks to fight all form of bias and discrimination due to race, creed, social, political or economic status or national origin. 1.2 Mission The mission of African teachers is the pursuit of the following principles: Commitment: Commitment to advance the standards of professionalism for teaching by promoting better preparation, encouraging relevant in-service training and securing the working conditions essential to the best performance of professional service. Responsibility: The focus Africateachers is to empower teachers in establishing goals and following through on commitments. Support: An individual is dramatically influenced by their support system. Africateachers wants to create an environment where African teachers can debrief and share their successes and challenges with fellow colleagues.

AFRICAN TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION

AFRICAN TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION AFRICAN TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION Globalizing African Technologies by providing access to resources that effectively address and manage the most pressing technological challenges on the continent.

African Trade Business Center

African Trade Business Center African Trade Business Center Benefits of ATBC Membership Priority access to ATBC’s related or exclusive projects Priority information on upcoming events & activities Inclusion on online membership only directory database. Priority access to all information (e.g. news letter of ATBC) and business opportunities information received by ATBC or produced by ATBC Basic trade research, counselling and matchmaking assistance from ATBC Advertising opportunity through members only forum. Facilitation for foreign visitors and exhibitors in Africa. TAP INTO THE POWER OF YOUR MEMBERSHIP INVESTMENT Bolster the wealth-creating capacity as an ATBC member and promote economic development within the entrepreneurial community. Establish innovative and effective change in the international global market place. Build strategic alliances, coalitions and affiliations in Africa. Participate in transforming public policy, nations, and influencing opinion makers. Gain assess to organized ATBC Meetings with exclusivity for member only events, procurement professional, cop orate connections & ATBC exclusive projects in Africa! Check-out the Newsroom on key business sectors in U.S. & African governments and/or from policymakers! Discover exclusive international matchmaking opportunities and services available to Premium & Standard members ONLY! Attend 2014 missions, reverse trade missions & investment sessions on Africa! ~ Power your Capacity ~ Power your Business ~ Power ATBC Opportunities The AgroBiz program combines access to a broad range of resources related to tropical agriculture with a chance to do hands-on work on a US Farm, academic institution or. research facility. The program provides an environment that fosters learning. The AgroBiz Program is designed to serve active overseas development practitioners with a chance to learn, study and work and promote the enterprise of agribusiness for both young or old and small or large scale participants.

African Union

African Union, AU African Union The advent of the African Union (AU) can be described as an event of great magnitude in the institutional evolution of the continent. On 9.9.1999, the Heads of State and Government of the Organisation of African Unity issued a Declaration (the Sirte Declaration) calling for the establishment of an African Union, with a view, inter alia, to accelerating the process of integration in the continent to enable it play its rightful role in the global economy while addressing multifaceted social, economic and political problems compounded as they are by certain negative aspects of globalisation. The main objectives of the OAU were, inter alia, to rid the continent of the remaining vestiges of colonization and apartheid; to promote unity and solidarity among African States; to coordinate and intensify cooperation for development; to safeguard the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Member States and to promote international cooperation within the framework of the United Nations. Indeed, as a continental organization the OAU provided an effective forum that enabled all Member States to adopt coordinated positions on matters of common concern to the continent in international fora and defend the interests of Africa effectively. Through the OAU Coordinating Committee for the Liberation of Africa, the Continent worked and spoke as one with undivided determination in forging an international consensus in support of the liberation struggle and the fight against apartheid. Quest for Unity African countries, in their quest for unity, economic and social development under the banner of the OAU, have taken various initiatives and made substantial progress in many areas which paved the way for the establishment of the AU. Noteworthy among these are: Lagos Plan of Action (LPA) and the Final Act of Lagos (1980); incorporating programmes and strategies for self reliant development and cooperation among African countries. The African Charter on Human and People’s Rights (Nairobi 1981) and the Grand Bay Declaration and Plan of Action on Human rights: two instruments adopted by the OAU to promote Human and People’s Rights in the Continent. The Human Rights Charter led to the establishment of the African Human Rights Commission located in Banjul, The Gambia. Africa’s Priority Programme for Economic recovery (APPER) – 1985: an emergency programme designed to address the development crisis of the 1980s, in the wake of protracted drought and famine that had engulfed the continent and the crippling effect of Africa’s external indebtedness. OAU Declaration on the Political and Socio-Economic Situation in Africa and the Fundamental Changes taking place in the World (1990): which underscored Africa’s resolve to seize the imitative, to determine its destiny and to address the challenges to peace, democracy and security. The Charter on Popular Participation adopted in 1990: a testimony to the renewed determination of the OAU to endeavour to place the African citizen at the center of development and decision-making. The Treaty establishing the African Economic Community (AEC) - 1991: commonly known as the Abuja Treaty, it seeks to create the AEC through six stages culminating in an African Common Market using the Regional Economic Communities (RECs) as building blocks. The Treaty has been in operation since 1994. The Mechanism for Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution (1993): a practical expression of the determination of the African leadership to find solutions to conflicts, promote peace, security and stability in Africa. Cairo Agenda for Action (1995): a programme for relaunching Africa’s political, economic and social development. African Common Position on Africa’s External Debt Crisis (1997): a strategy for addressing the Continent’s External Debt Crisis. The Algiers decision on Unconstitutional Changes of Government (1999) and the Lome Declaration on the framework for an OAU Response to Unconstitutional Changes (2000). The 2000 Solemn Declaration on the Conference on Security, Stability, Development and Cooperation: establishes the fundamental principles for the promotion of Democracy and Good Governance in the Continent. Responses to other challenges: Africa has initiated collective action through the OAU in the protection of environment, in fighting international terrorism, in combating the scourge of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, malaria and tuberculosis or dealing with humanitarian issues such as refugees and displaced persons, landmines, small and light weapons among others. The Constitutive Act of the African Union: adopted in 2000 at the Lome Summit (Togo), entered into force in 2001. The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) : adopted as a Programme of the AU at the Lusaka Summit (2001). Advent of the AU The OAU initiatives paved the way for the birth of AU. In July 1999, the Assembly decided to convene an extraordinary session to expedite the process of economic and political integration in the continent. Since then, four Summits have been held leading to the official launching of the African Union: The Sirte Extraordinary Session (1999) decided to establish an African Union The Lome Summit (2000) adopted the Constitutive Act of the Union. The Lusaka Summit (2001) drew the road map for the implementation of the AU The Durban Summit (2002) launched the AU and convened the 1st Assembly of the Heads of States of the African Union. Vision of the African Union The vision of the African Union is that of: “An integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa, driven by its own citizens and representing a dynamic force in global arena.” This vision of a new, forwardlooking, dynamic and integrated Africa will be fully realized through relentless struggle on several fronts and as a long-term endeavour. The African Union has shifted focus from supporting liberation movements in the erstwhile African territories under colonialism and apartheid, as envisaged by the OAU since 1963 and the Constitutive Act, to an organization spear-heading Africa’s development and integration. The Objectives of the AU To achieve greater unity and solidarity between the African countries and the peoples of Africa; To defend the sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence of its Member States; To accelerate the political and socio-economic integration of the continent; To promote and defend African common positions on issues of interest to the continent and its peoples; To encourage international cooperation, taking due account of the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; To promote peace, security, and stability on the continent; To promote democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance; To promote and protect human and peoples' rights in accordance with the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights and other relevant human rights instruments; To establish the necessary conditions which enable the continent to play its rightful role in the global economy and in international negotiations; To promote sustainable development at the economic, social and cultural levels as well as the integration of African economies; To promote co-operation in all fields of human activity to raise the living standards of African peoples; To coordinate and harmonize the policies between the existing and future Regional Economic Communities for the gradual attainment of the objectives of the Union; To advance the development of the continent by promoting research in all fields, in particular in science and technology; To work with relevant international partners in the eradication of preventable diseases and the promotion of good health on the continent. The Organs of the AU The Assembly Composed of Heads of State and Government or their duly accredited representatives. The Assembly of Heads of State and Government is the supreme organ of the Union. The Executive Council Composed of Ministers or Authorities designated by the Governments of Members States. The Executive Council is responsible to the Assembly. The Commission Composed of the Chairperson, the Deputy Chairperson, eight Commissioners and Staff members; Each Commissioner shall be responsible for a portfolio. The Permanent Representatives' Committee Composed of Permanent Representatives of Member States accredited to the Union. The Permanent Representatives Committee is charged with the responsibility of preparing the work of the Executive Council. Peace and Security Council (PSC) By decision AHG/Dec 160 (xxxvii) of the Summit of Lusaka, July 2001, a decision was made for the creation within the African Union of the Peace and Security Council. The Protocol establishing the PSC is in the process of ratification. Pan-African Parliament A Pan-African Parliament, and organ to ensure the full participation of African peoples in governance, development and economic integration of the Continent. The protocol relating to the composition, powers, functions and organization of the Pan-African Parliament has been signed by Member States and is in the process of ratification. ECOSOCC The Economic, Social and Cultural Council, an advisory organ composed of different social and professional groups of the Member States of the Union. The statutes determining the functions, powers, composition and organization of the Economic, Social and Cultural Council have been prepared and will be submitted to Maputo Summit. The Court of Justice A Court of Justice of the Union shall be established. The statutes defining the composition and functions of the Court of Justice have been prepared and will be submitted to the Assembly in Maputo. The Specialized Technical Committees The following Specialized Technical Committees are meant to address sectoral issues and are at Ministerial Level: The Committee on Rural Economy and Agricultural Matters; The Committee on Monetary and Financial Affairs; The Committee on Trade, Customs and Immigration Matters; The Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, Energy, Natural Resources and Environment; The Committee on Transport, Communications and Tourism; The Committee on Health, Labour and Social Affairs; and The Committee on Education, Culture and Human Resources. The Financial Institutions The African Central bank The African Monetary Fund The African Investment Bank The AU Commission The Commission is the key organ playing a central role in the day-to-day management of the African Union. Among others, it represents the Union and defends its interests; elaborates draft common positions of the Union; prepares strategic plans and studies for the consideration of the Executive Council; elaborates, promotes, coordinates and harmonizes the programmes and policies of the Union with those of the RECs; ensures the mainstreaming of gender in all programmes and activities of the Union. Members of the Commission Chairperson; Deputy Chairperson; Eight (8) Commissioners. Staff members Portfolios of the Commission 1. PEACE AND SECURITY (Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution, and Combating Terrorism...) 2. POLITICAL AFFAIRS (Human Rights, Democracy, Good Governance, Electoral Institutions, Civil Society Organizations, Humanitarian Affairs, Refugees, Returnees and Internally Displaced Persons) 3. INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENERGY (Energy, Transport, Communications, Infrastructure and Tourism…) 4. SOCIAL AFFAIRS (Health, Children, Drug Control, Population, Migration, Labour and Employment, Sports and Culture…) 5. HUMAN RESOURCES, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (Education, Information Technology Communication, Youth, Human Resources, Science and Technology…) 6. TRADE AND INDUSTRY (Trade, Industry, Customs and Immigration Matters…) 7. RURAL ECONOMY AND AGRICULTURE (Rural Economy, Agriculture and Food Security, Livestock, Environment, Water and Natural Resources and Desertification…) 8. ECONOMIC AFFAIRS (Economic Integration, Monetary Affairs, Private Sector Development, Investment and Resource Mobilization…).

African Union

African Union African Union The advent of the African Union (AU) can be described as an event of great magnitude in the institutional evolution of the continent. On 9.9.1999, the Heads of State and Government of the Organisation of African Unity issued a Declaration (the Sirte Declaration) calling for the establishment of an African Union, with a view, inter alia, to accelerating the process of integration in the continent to enable it play its rightful role in the global economy while addressing multifaceted social, economic and political problems compounded as they are by certain negative aspects of globalisation.

African Union - African Diaspora

African Union - African Diaspora, African Union, African Diaspora African Union - African Diaspora An important and opportune event Invite and encourage the full participation of the African Diaspora as an important part of our Continent, in the building of the African Union The African Union’s draft consensus definition of the African Diaspora considers it as "[consisting] of people of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union." In a new Article 3 (q), adopted in February 2003, the African Union Constitutive Act declares that the organisation shall "invite and encourage the full participation of the African Diaspora as an important part of our Continent, in the building of the African Union." The African Union has mandated South Africa to present in the first half of 2008 the African Union-African Diaspora Summit at the level of Heads of State and Government. The theme of the Summit is : “Towards the realisation of a united and integrated Africa and its Diaspora : A shared vision for sustainable development to address common challenges.”

African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative

African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative, AU Diaspora Health Initiative, African Union, African Diaspora Health Initiative African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative Volunteer Health Care & Health Care Program Based in Washington, DC Make a difference in Africa by joining the African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative. We are currently mobilizing health care workers to go to Africa. Brain Drain We are trying to convert brain drain to brain gain. Brain Drain is a process that has taken place over decades where African health care professionals have left for better places. This occurred because of economic and political conditions in their countries of origin. However, Africa is now a very vibrant and emerging market. Mobilizing Health Care Workers Our organization has chosen to bring health care to one country at a time. In the west, we are starting with Ghana; in the east, we are starting with Tanzania; in the south, we choose Malawi; in central Africa, we are starting with Equatorial Guinea; and in the north, we choose Sudan. African Children, Volunteer Health Care, Health Care Program in Washington, DC Guest Worker Program Volunteers are to provide their own air fare to and from Africa. Accomodation, food and tranport will be provided by the host country. Currently we are working in Malawi. If you are interested in coming to Malawi.

African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative

African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative African Union - African Diaspora Health Initiative Brain Drain: We are trying to convert brain drain to brain gain. Brain Drain is a process that has taken place over decades where African health care professionals have left for better places. This occurred because of economic and political conditions in their countries of origin. However, Africa is now a very vibrant and emerging market. Mobilizing Health Care Workers: Our organization has chosen to bring health care to one country at a time. In the west, we are starting with Ghana; in the east, we are starting with Tanzania; in the south, we choose Malawi; in central Africa, we are starting with Equatorial Guinea; and in the north, we choose Sudan. Guest Worker Program: Volunteers are to provide their own air fare to and from Africa. Accomodation, food and tranport will be provided by the host country. Currently we are working in Malawi. If you are interested in coming to Malawi, contact us at info@au-adhi.or

African Union African Diaspora 6th Region

African Union African Diaspora 6th Region African Union African Diaspora 6th Region The AU Diaspora, as currently defined by the AU, is composed of African and African descendants residing in the USA, Canada, Central, and South America, the Caribbean, and Brazil (Western Hemisphere) and in Europe. In Africa itself (repatriated Africans), in the Middle East Region, and in Asia, there are also people, who can well argue that they too are members of the Diaspora community. It is one of the understood guidelines from the AU that neither one individual nor one current organization in these geographical areas can, or is expected to, adequately represent the diverse interests of the Diaspora at the AU meetings. However, it will be through the existing civil society/community-based organizations that such AU representation will be organized and chosen. Towards October 2007, there was only a little more than four months left for realizing the mobilization of the African Diaspora Community in the European Region to reach consensus about the Diaspora Agenda and the election of the AU Representatives Europe Region. It is thus of great importance that the Diaspora in the Europe Region States get involved in the decision-making process. As a major recommendation, the workgroup strongly suggested that members from the Holland ADCC and their experts have communications with the African Diaspora partners in the other Europe Region (centres) to properly explain how Holland has implemented its method and how the other regions can do the same thing, which will hopefully lead to at least Community Councils in every European Region, if not fully elected AU Diasporan Representatives from each area. This needs to be accomplished before the scheduled September Europe Diaspora Regional Assembly. On Regional Europe Level the proposed objectives for the first AU African Diaspora Europe Region “Town Hall” Consultation Meeting are: The information and mobilization of the African Diaspora Community in Europe Region; The decision-making process/dialogue/agreement on a managing (=Steering) and monitoring structure (working/organization, formation and communication structure on local/grassroots level, National and Regional level) as well as a Fundraising strategy; The decision-making process/dialogue/agreement on the Program of Topics of Concerns (The Agenda) the Europe Region towards an overall Diaspora Agenda; The preparation activities towards the Summit in October 2007 in South Africa; The decision-making process/dialogue/agreement on continuing to organize those parts of Europe missed in this first opportunity to coalesce, and a discussion about any problems and advice on continuing to implement the selection criteria and the election process from the adapted Holland Methodology. This is also in relation to the invitation of the AU for the election of 20 members with the purpose to taking their seats during the ECOSOCC Summit in December 2007. On behalf of the AU 6th Region African Diaspora Facilitators Working Group Europe Region including the Netherlands Mrs. Barryl A Biekman AUADS (African Union African Diaspora) Facilitator Europe Region PADU/Pan African Diaspora Union Facilitator Europe Region/SRDCoalition PANAFSTRAG EUROPE/NL: Facilitator Europe Region African Diaspora Liaison Organization, Mission & Objectives The African Union (AU) has invited the African Diaspora to become “voting members” of the AU so that together African people can move toward making the unification of the African continent into the reality called the Union of African States (or United States of Africa) in the near future. The AU (through its Executive Council and the implications of its amended constitution) designated the Diaspora as the Sixth Region of Africa (the other five regions are North, South, East, West and Central Africa). The African Diaspora consists of the diasporas created by the movement and transfer of Africans and their descendants throughout the world, to places such as the Americas (including the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Central America and South America), Europe and Asia. Much of the African Diasporas are descended from people that were sold into slavery during the Transatlantic Slave Trade, with the largest population living in Brazil. Although the exact definition is still a work in progress, in 2005, the AU defined the Diaspora as "... peoples of African descent and heritage living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship, and who remain committed to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union." The mobilization of African Diaspora bodies is an initiative that has been formally mandated by the African Union to the South African Government for the creation of a stronger and meaningful contribution by Diasporas to the development of the African Continent. This is also aligned with efforts to get the international community to respond and contribute to the overall development of the African Continent. Since the RCC in the Europe Region several Europe Region Meetings were initiated and/or organised by the AUADS Facilitators Working Group Europe Region in cooperation with the South African Governments in the respective countries: Paris/France; The Hague/Holland; Berlin/Germany. In Brussels/Belgium in cooperation with the African Union Permanent Mission. “A Leave no Community Behind” Model was discussed and approved as a strategy to organise and mobilize the Diaspora community in the Europe Region. The AUADS Facilitators are functioned as volunteers, who coordinate meetings, maintain the records, communicate regularly with Europe Region Facilitators; the SRDCcoalition; PADU members, South African Government & AU relevant authorities. SRDC(Sub Regional Diaspora Council)coalition exists of the Western Hemisphere (currently including the USA, the Caribbean, Central America, South America/Brazil and Canada); Europe and the African Hebrews from Dimona/Jerusalem. There is a temporary AUADS secretariat in cooperation with Chapter Germany & the Netherlands functioned until formal decision about the structure has been realise by the AU authorities. Links to Network and Relevant Organizations for the African Union African Diaspora 6th Region knowledge: http://www.srdcinternational.org http://www.paduinternational.com http://www.auads.info http://www.platformslavernijmonument.nl http://www.dirco.gov.za/dispora/index.html http://au.int

African Unity of Harlem

African Unity of Harlem African Unity of Harlem AFRIKAN UNITY OF HARLEM, INC [A.U.H.] is an umbrella organizational catalyst to spearhead the empowerment and unity of Afrikan People worldwide. There are four pillars supporting the A.U.H umbrella including: Charitable, Educational, Religious and Scientific. CHARITABLE: The aim is to be a resource conduit for directing the needy to existing facilities which can help obtain food, clothing, and counseling. EDUCATIONAL: 1. To AWAKEN our people worldwide from the blinding hypnotic sleep of self—denial, self-hatred, lethargy, and disillusionment resulting from slavery and colonialism. 2. To EMPOWER our people by being the umbrella catalyst for encouraging community groups to work together for our own benefit (as well as others). 3. To engender our younger generations with RESPECT for one another, nature and to be the bridge for creating WORK-STUDY programs in Afrika. 4. To be the COMMUNICATION vehicle for helping to connect our people at the grassroots level about OUR STORY from an Afrikan perspective. 5. With the help of our ELDERS, to generate the knowledge for CREATING OUR OWN INSTITUTIONS. 6. To TRAIN LEADERS for INSTITUTIONAL CONTINUITY. RELIGIOUS: I. To reinstate the MORAL and SOULOLOGY for our people by reconstructing and then applying the results of a comparative analysis of our Heritage-Traditions from Ancient Kush, Nubia and Khemit. 2. To engender RESPECT for our Elders. Parents and Children. Family and Community. SCIENTIFIC: Finally, to help UNIFY Afrikan and Afrikan Heritage People worldwide by creating a forum for us to connect and work together to resolve AFRIKAN GLOBAL ISSUES such Health (HIV/AIDS), Nutrition, and Socio-Political concerns. Dr. Gabriel A. Oyibo, Nigerian Astro- Phycist and discoverer of’ the “GRAND UNIFIED THEORM” (or “The Theory of Everything”) is playing a leading role in this area. Afrikan Unity of Harlem, Inc. recognizes that in order to have the Unity we must be willing to sit down with one another to discuss our common issues resulting in a collective goal. We have seen much war, famine, unjust and inhumane acts thrown on the backs of our children from generation to generation. Colonization of our Continent divided our land making us think we are different from one another. The enslavement of more then 700 million of our people from the Continent left 500 years of separation and lost of our cultural identity. Posterity demands that, we, as One Afrikan Nation both home and abroad, must commit 100% of our efforts to continue our ancestors plight of unifying of our Mother Land and our Peoples. No longer can we blame others for exploiting our resources, people, and land for we allowed all of it to happen. We, as a Nation of Afrikan People must govern ourselves and take a moral responsibility for our Continent and her Beloved Afrikan People. Now in this 21st century we are the oldest civilization on earth birthing all human life and creating for them the culture of science, art, religion, language, and the like which gave birth to the whole world fostering great and mighty nations today. Afrikan Unity of Harlem, Inc. is calling ALL Afrikan People Worldwide to stop the false propaganda, made to market way of thinking against our homeland and people. We have everything we need: food, natural resources, and intelligent skillful Afrikan people to make it all happen. The time for Afrikan Unity is NOW for the talks of a new world order is already underway and Afrika is high on the list as a renewed frontier for exploitation.

African University College of Communication (AUCC)

African University College of Communication, AUCC African University College of Communication (AUCC) The African University College of Communications (AUCC) is an autonomous private institution dedicated mainly to the study of media and communication. AUCC was established as the Africa Institute of Journalism & Communications (AIJC), in 2002 by Hon. Kojo Yankah, former editor of Ghana?s widest circulation newspaper, the Daily Graphic, one-time director of the Ghana Institute of Journalism, and former Member of Parliament and Minister of State. The diploma-awarding Institute admitted its first batch of 60 students in October 2002 under a collaborative arrangement with the Ghana Institute of Journalism. In 2007, the Africa Institute of Journalism & Communications received approval from the National Accreditation Board to offer a four-year BA degree programme in affiliation with the University of Ghana, Legon and became The African University College of Communications. The institution is currently petitioning the National Accreditation Board to expand its offerings in complementary areas in an effort to meet the growing needs of the country. AUCC held its first Bachelor degree graduation ceremony on December 10, 2011 at the Discovery House campus of the University during which the institution graduated its very first batch of B.A. degree students (46 students). The occasion was also used to graduate the University?s 8th batch of Diploma Students (33 students). In 2012, the African University College of Communications (AUCC) graduated its 9th batch of diploma students (communications) and its 2nd Batch of Degree students (B.A in communications). This event also constituted the climax of its 10th anniversary celebrations on the theme "Education in an age of globalization and convergence - AUCC @ 10 ". With a current student population of over 1,000 students coming from eleven African countries, AUCC presently offers Bachelors degree courses in Communication Studies and Business Administration and is preparing to launch Masters programmes in these two programmes this year. AUCC?s state- of- the art digital facilities aimed at transporting the acquisition of knowledge (by students) into the information age include wireless internet connectivity, well-resourced e-libraries, radio/photo studios, digital video production labs, and multimedia lecture halls. The mission of AUCC is to prepare lifelong learners to become innovative problem-solvers and ethical leaders in the fields of communication, business and related areas through excellence in interdisciplinary teaching, research, and collaboration at the local, regional and global levels using a pan-African Framework.

African Views

African Views, African Views framework African Views African Views is an information, communication, and collaboration framework. We facilitate open source information collection, free self publishing, knowledge sharing, and ease of comprehension for the general public. Our goal is to promote communication and collaboration between Africans and the African diaspora, as well as provide a platform for fair representation and valuable information sharing about people of African descent in every nation. Welcome to the African Views framework.

AFRICAN VILLAGE -Gateway To The African Marketplace

AFRICAN VILLAGE, Gateway To The African Marketplace AFRICAN VILLAGE -Gateway To The African Marketplace Your Gateway To The African Marketplace. The African Village, a subsidiary of Seone Communications, is dedicated to fostering the growth of our businesses, our community, and those with an interest in our community, by promoting access to the internet. Our philosophy is based on recognizing the importance of exposure, information and networking opportunities to today's entrepreneurs. Our mission therefore, amongst other things, is to promote access to the internet and all its limitless resources. On our site you will find a Directory that gives you information about locating products or services, a Business Resource Center, an Events Calendar, What's the Buzz, Internet Strategies and more. This information is updated regularly. As we progress we will continuously strive to expand and improve our services, and the best way to do this is by getting input from you. Our Mission Provide affordable internet presence for small or mid-sized businesses and organizations Create greater awareness of the products and services of Black-owned business Create an integrated resource of African-owned businesses, products and services Serve as a business databank that can match community needs with available resources Serve as a clearing house of information and contacts Provide timely and accurate information on business opportunities Provide a networking contact point Provide a forum to discuss issues of common concern Provide a collaborative avenue for improving the community's socio-economic status. Channel our money back into our community

African Women Australia (AWAU)

African Women Australia, AWAU African Women Australia (AWAU) Mission: African Women Australia (AWAU) works to Advocate, Represent, Train and Empower African women and their communities within Australian social policy; locally, nationally and internationally. Advocacy: AWAU's advocacy encapsulates research, consultation and the collation of information and issues impacting the lives of African Women, their families and communities. Some of the issues advocated on in the past have included; Family and children; Housing, Employment, Domestic violence. ?AWAU monitor's such issues to ensure the appropriate outcomes are achieved. AWAU offers flagship training on rights and representation skills to enable African women to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to represent themselves and their communities at all relevant levels of Australian society. We aim to strengthen the voice of African women and their communities through participation. AWAU provides training on Human Rights for African communities and service providers as well as training on representation and leadership skills.AWAU fosters an empowered African community through participation in talks, conferences, advocacy and training. We provide an avenue for African women, societies and organisations to come together and share ideas, raise awareness of important issues, network and form new collaborative partnerships.

African Women Empowernement Forum

African Women Empowernement Forum African Women Empowernement Forum AWEF was established in April 2006 by women of African origin who are Refugees and Asylum seekers.AWEF works hard to change the concept of the need for dependency among African women who are refugees and asylum seekers locally in Nottingham, with an objective in widening the (freedom from dependency) scope regionally and eventual nationally. Mission: The organisation was established for the empowerment of women of African origin, in particular, to advocate for women on gender issues, equality of access and non discrimination, based on race, gender, age or immigration status, and to have an imput on policies that impact on them locally and nationally.

African Women's Cancer Awareness Association

African Women's Cancer Awareness Association African Women's Cancer Awareness Association The African Women's Cancer Awareness Association (AWCAA) is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization. AWCAA was established in 2004 by a coalition of African immigrant women health professionals in order to address disparities in awareness, prevention and access to healthcare for African immigrant communities that face cancer and other life threatening illnesses. The group has grown to encompass healthcare professionals, entrepreneurs and concerned individuals dedicated to eliminating these disparities within the Washington metropolitan area, the continent of Africa and beyond.

African Women's Council of Australia (AWCoA)

African Women?s Council of Australia, AWCoA African Women's Council of Australia (AWCoA) The African Women?s Council of Australia (AWCoA) was formed as a result of the identified need for African women?s voice. The organisation strives to build self-esteem in the African women living in Australia, prevent or control behaviour which may result in African women, or their children, suffering domestic violence, emotional abuse, sexual abuse or physical abuse or lead them to suicide and self-harm. It is an advocacy organisation established to mobilise support and develop strategies to ensure inclusion, visibility and reflection of the voices, concerns and demands of African women at the local, national and international agenda.

African Women's Development & Communication Network

African Women's Development & Communication Network African Women's Development & Communication Network The African Women's Development and Communication Network (FEMNET) is a membership-based pan-African Network set up in 1988 to advance African women's development, equality and other human rights. Over the years FEMNET has played a central role in sharing information, experiences, ideas and strategies among African women's NGOs in order to strengthen women's capacity to participate effectively in the development processes on the continent. FEMNET has played a lead role in building the women's movement in Africa and has ensured that African women voices are amplified and influence decisions made at national, regional and global levels, which have direct and indirect impact on their lives. FEMNET operates through its Regional Secretariat based in Nairobi Kenya and National Focal Point (NFPs) organisations most of which are national women's networks, consortia or umbrella organizations spread out in over 30 countries in Africa.

African Writer

African Writer African Writer The Journey: We started this journey back in 1999 as the Writers Write category of another website, Nigeriansinamerica.com. But the section quickly assumed a life of its own and in the year 2003, we moved all the literary entries to this domain, Africanwriter.com. Here we are today, so many years later, still as welcoming of adventurous writing as ever, and still featuring works by emerging as well as established African writers and critics. Contribute: The writers here, scattered across the globe ? from Nigeria to the ivory towers of Frankfurt ? remain united by their African root and hopes and the unyielding umbilical cord of their creativity. Africanwriter.com welcomes contributions exclusively from/about African writers (and writing) at home and abroad. Dare to add your voice to the gathering thunder? To get a feel of the kind of materials we publish, please check out the entries posted here in the different categories over the years. If you are confident that you can write as well as the writers we have published, or you believe your voice is unique enough to command attention, please contact us using this FORM.

African, African American and Diaspora Studies at Wheaton College

African, African American, Diaspora Studies, Wheaton College African, African American and Diaspora Studies at Wheaton College As a field of inquiry, African, African American, diaspora studies examines the experiences of people of African descent in the United States, Africa and the Caribbean, as well as in Latin America, Europe and Asia. The program allows students and faculty to explore the range of interrelated cultures, histories, art, and intellectual contributions of Africans and people of African descent throughout the diaspora. The faculty also views participation in co-curricular activities (student and faculty colloquia, guest lectures, campus projects) as vital to the development of students as responsible citizens of the college community and the world. The interdisciplinary program in African, African American, diaspora studies is an essential component of the college's mission to enable students to understand and participate in shaping the multicultural, interdependent world of which they are a part. It encourages students to complement classroom learning with study, research and internship opportunities abroad and in the United States.

AFRICAN, BLACK & DIASPORIC HISTORY

AFRICAN, BLACK & DIASPORIC HISTORY AFRICAN, BLACK & DIASPORIC HISTORY AFRICAN, BLACK & DIASPORIC HISTORY is ....

African-American Migration Experience

African-American Migration Experience African-American Migration Experience In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience presents more than 16,500 pages of texts, 8,300 illustrations, and more than 60 maps. The Web site is organized around thirteen defining migrations that have formed and transformed African America and the nation. Each migration is presented through five units: A narrative About 100 illustrations, each with caption, and bibliographical, indexing, and ordering information From twenty to forty research resources consisting of essays, books, book chapters, articles, and manuscripts Maps Lesson plans for teachers In addition, each migration has a bibliography (references) and a gateway of related Web sites. Migrations can be reached through "Browse by" Migrations, Geography or Timeline. Once a migration has been selected, users can either read the narrative and look at the images, or focus on images only by clicking on "View Image Gallery." From the drop-down menu, they can elect to see all the images, or only those associated with a particular part of the narrative. In the narrative, highlighted words take users to a glossary definition. The glossary can also be accessed through the Glossary box on the lower bar of each page. A "Search" function is accessible from all pages. It enables users to search through texts, illustrations, maps, lesson plans, and glossary for a particular keyword, or sentence. All books, book chapters, essays, articles, and manuscript are presented in their original form as well as in a searchable version. All texts and images can be printed. Printer-friendly versions of the texts are available.

African-American Migration Experience

African-American Migration Experience African-American Migration Experience In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience presents more than 16,500 pages of texts, 8,300 illustrations, and more than 60 maps.The Web site is organized around thirteen defining migrations that have formed and transformed African America and the nation. Each migration is presented through five units: About 100 illustrations, each with caption, and bibliographical, indexing, and ordering information. From twenty to forty research resources consisting of essays, books, book chapters, articles, and manuscripts. In addition, each migration has a bibliography (references) and a gateway of related Web sites. Migrations can be reached through "Browse by" Migrations, Geography or Timeline. Once a migration has been selected, users can either read the narrative and look at the images, or focus on images only by clicking on "View Image Gallery." From the drop-down menu, they can elect to see all the images, or only those associated with a particular part of the narrative. In the narrative, highlighted words take users to a glossary definition. The glossary can also be accessed through the Glossary box on the lower bar of each page. A "Search" function is accessible from all pages. It enables users to search through texts, illustrations, maps, lesson plans, and glossary for a particular keyword, or sentence. All books, book chapters, essays, articles, and manuscript are presented in their original form as well as in a searchable version.

African-American Mosaic

the African-American Mosaic African-American Mosaic This exhibit marks the publication of The African-American Mosaic: A Library of Congress Resource Guide for the Study of Black History and Culture. A noteworthy and singular publication, the Mosaic is the first Library-wide resource guide to the institution's African- American collections. Covering the nearly 500 years of the black experience in the Western hemisphere, the Mosaic surveys the full range size, and variety of the Library's collections, including books, periodicals, prints, photographs, music, film, and recorded sound. Moreover, the African-American Mosaic represents the start of a new kind of access to the Library's African-American collections, and, the Library trusts, the beginning of reinvigorated research and programming drawing on these, now systematically identified, collections. This exhibit is but a sampler of the kinds of materials and themes covered by the publication and the Library's collections. Many of the exhibit items are featured in the Mosaic. Other exhibit materials, not specifically described in the publication, are also included to illustrate that the Mosaic is an effective guide to the Library's rich collections, not an exhaustive inventory. The exhibit covers only four areas --Colonization, Abolition, Migrations, and the WPA-- of the many covered by the Mosaic. These topics were selected not only because they illustrate well the depth, breadth, and richness of the Library's black history collections, but also because of the significant and interesting interplay among them. For example, the "back-to-Africa" movement represented by the American Colonization Society is vigorously opposed by abolitionists, and the movement of blacks to the North is documented by the writers and artists who participated in federal projects of the 1930s. Also, to illustrate that the Mosaic opens avenues for further research, several items are included which, though important for black history, cannot have their full stories told until further research is completed. Finally, this presentation is a sampler of a much larger exhibit now in progress. In 1998, the Library will mount a major exhibition and cultural program examining the impact of African- American history and tradition in the formation of American national identity. The 1998 outreach program will be this institution's first extended reflection upon its pervasive black holdings, and The African-American Mosaic will be a major resource guide in that program's development and realization.

Africans in Russia

Africans in Russia Africans in Russia Who are we? WE ARE AFRICANS! We welcome you to the African Community Forum in Russia. The idea to have a forum where Africans in Russia can meet on a constant basis (at least in the virtual world) was born some years ago but it was a difficult task to realise for many reasons part of which was that most Africans in Russia are very much isolated. But thankfully the situation is changing and thus, this website was created in order to continue to foster good relationship among Africans here in Russia and around the world. We created this website to help Africans get up-to-date information about Russia and to seek for help and ask vital questions. We created this forum to decrease fear about Russia among Africans and also to increase their awareness about the current affairs of the current Russia. We pray that this forum will eventually become a one stop information center for ALL Africans who live, lived or plan to live in Russia.

Africans in the Diaspora

Africans in the Diaspora Africans in the Diaspora Africans in the Diaspora (AiD) envisions a self-reliant, socially and economically just Africa. To achieve that level of transformational change, Africans must drive the process of development in their communities. We work to ensure that Africans on the continent and in the diaspora play a leading role in Africa?s progress by connecting their skills, resources, and ideas through our Funds, Voices, and Connections programs.

Africans in the Diaspora (AiD)

Africans in the Diaspora, AiD Africans in the Diaspora (AiD) Africans in the Diaspora (AiD) envisions a self-reliant, socially and economically just Africa. To achieve that level of transformational change, Africans must drive the process of development in their communities. We work to ensure that Africans on the continent and in the diaspora play a leading role in Africa’s progress by connecting their skills, resources, and ideas through our Funds, Voices, and Connections programs.

Africare

Africare Africare Mission: Africare works to improve the quality of life of the people in Africa. Vision: Africare is a leading non-governmental organization (NGO) committed to addressing African development and policy issues by working in partnership with African people to build sustainable, healthy and productive communities.

AfricaRecruit

AfricaRecruit, african diaspora AfricaRecruit AfricaRecruit is a programme plan of action taken to build robust and enduring productive capacity throughout the continent. It is an innovative service delivery vehicle with its focus on capacity building through human resources using its various networks within and outside Africa. For more details on AfricaRecruit, kindly click here Shortage of skills is a critical constraint that is holding back investment, job creation and improved public services for Africa. Although exact figures are difficult to obtain, probably 40% of African professionals are now living outside the continent, meaning upwards of 5 million doctors, teachers, engineers, and technicians. African immigrants to the United States boast some of the highest educational attainments of any immigrant group and there are now more than 250,000 scientists and physicians of African descent in the United States. The continent spends over $4bn in technical assistance each year in sectors such as health, education and the environment, as well as public management. For more detailed information on Africa's brain drain, please click here.

AfricVisions

AfricVisions AfricVisions “In every community, there is work to be done. In every nation, there are wounds to heal. In every heart, there is the power to do it.” This citation by Marianne Williamson rings especially true for African communities and nations. Faced to what appears to be insurmountable obstacles, we tend to underestimate the power in our hearts. Africvisions.com showcases news, ideas and work of innovators, visionaries and ordinary people whose courage will inspire us to realize our visions of a truly free and prosperous Africa. Feel free to post your thoughts and comments, and add you to our Facebook page to the list of those who love it.

Afrik.com

Afrik.com Afrik.com Afrik.com, le site doyen et le site leader Depuis l’an 2000, le quotidien en ligne Afrik.com est devenu la référence de l’information sur le continent, référencé en première page de nombreuses requêtes par Google, fréquenté mensuellement par plus de deux millions d’internautes. Plus de deux millions de lecteurs, plus de 10 millions de publicités vues chaque mois, plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’abonnés à la Lettre d’information hebdomadaire, et le développement de plusieurs sites parallèles couvrant les thèmes les plus attendus : économie, football, cuisine, beauté, voyages, culture, blogs africains... La croissance de l’audience est exponentielle ! Les fondamentaux L’indépendance Dans un univers médiatique marqué par l’étroite dépendance des grands médias panafricains d’information, Afrik.com est le média international le plus indépendant parce qu’il est soutenu par des hommes et des femmes de médias, attachés au développement de la communication en Afrique. Présents au capital d’Afrik.com et soutiens constants de son développement, ce sont par exemple : Nagui, Mireille Dumas, Michel Field, le Groupe Lagardère qui a repris les parts de feu Jean-Luc Delarue, Pascal Josèphe, Christian Gérin, Christophe Schmidt, Olivier Zegna Rata, Antoine Ganne, Mamoudou Traoré, la Fondation Marguerite et Alexandre Varenne... Hervé Bourges a aussi été dès l’origine un fervent supporter d’Afrik.com. Offrir un regard africain sur l’actualité Ouvrir les yeux. L’Afrique, continent de l’exclusion médiatique. Les médias internationaux sont aveugles à son quotidien et à ses réalités : 52 pays occultés du web mondial, absents de l’agenda international, sauf lorsqu’il est question de catastrophes ou d’urgences humanitaires. Le premier objectif d’Afrik.com est d’ouvrir une large porte sur le web pour les sociétés et les cultures africaines. Donner la parole. L’Afrique est la grande muette dans le jeu médiatique mondial. Où est l’audiovisuel africain ? Quelle diffusion pour la presse écrite africaine ? Quelle audience pour les radios africaines dans le reste du monde ? Second objectif d’Afrik.com : mettre en avant les médias d’Afrique, les créateurs africains, les peuples africains. Leur parole a sa place dans le concert médiatique mondial. Peser les mots. Le journalisme international a ses règles, ses cadres déontologiques et professionnels : Afrik.com a eu d’emblée la volonté de développer une rédaction internationale, ouverte, participative, mais rigoureuse et fiable dans son traitement de l’actualité. Parce que l’information est un métier et que chaque mot compte, Afrik.com a choisi d’être un média libre et responsable.

Afrikan Diaspora Studies

Afrikan Diaspora Studies Afrikan Diaspora Studies The Afrikan Diaspora Studies Theme Community provides students with opportunities to be immersed in Afrikan culture at UCLA and beyond. Living in this community allows students with similar interests to create lifelong friendships, partake in programming and dialogue that is mindful of issues surrounding Afrikan culture, and provides students with opportunities to be involved in the Los Angeles community. “Afrikan” is spelled with a “k” rather than a “c” to symbolize the reunion of Afrikan people worldwide. “Diaspora” refers to any group that has dispersed outside its traditional homeland. All students, regardless of cultural heritage or major, are invited to join in on the rich exploration of Afrikan culture.

AFRIKAN UNITY OF HARLEM

AFRIKAN UNITY OF HARLEM, auh AFRIKAN UNITY OF HARLEM AFRIKAN UNITY OF HARLEM, INC [A.U.H.] is an umbrella organizational catalyst to spearhead the empowerment and unity of Afrikan People worldwide. There are four pillars supporting the A.U.H umbrella including: Charitable, Educational, Religious and Scientific. CHARITABLE: The aim is to be a resource conduit for directing the needy to existing facilities which can help obtain food, clothing, and counseling. EDUCATIONAL: 1. To AWAKEN our people worldwide from the blinding hypnotic sleep of self—denial, self-hatred, lethargy, and disillusionment resulting from slavery and colonialism. 2. To EMPOWER our people by being the umbrella catalyst for encouraging community groups to work together for our own benefit (as well as others). 3. To engender our younger generations with RESPECT for one another, nature and to be the bridge for creating WORK-STUDY programs in Afrika. 4. To be the COMMUNICATION vehicle for helping to connect our people at the grassroots level about OUR STORY from an Afrikan perspective. 5. With the help of our ELDERS, to generate the knowledge for CREATING OUR OWN INSTITUTIONS. 6. To TRAIN LEADERS for INSTITUTIONAL CONTINUITY. RELIGIOUS: I. To reinstate the MORAL and SOULOLOGY for our people by reconstructing and then applying the results of a comparative analysis of our Heritage-Traditions from Ancient Kush, Nubia and Khemit. 2. To engender RESPECT for our Elders. Parents and Children. Family and Community. SCIENTIFIC: Finally, to help UNIFY Afrikan and Afrikan Heritage People worldwide by creating a forum for us to connect and work together to resolve AFRIKAN GLOBAL ISSUES such Health (HIV/AIDS), Nutrition, and Socio-Political concerns. Dr. Gabriel A. Oyibo, Nigerian Astro- Phycist and discoverer of’ the “GRAND UNIFIED THEORM” (or “The Theory of Everything”) is playing a leading role in this area.

Afrikanspot

Afrikanspot Afrikanspot Afrikanspot is a bilingual (English and French) platform reflecting the diversity of the African Diaspora living in the New York area. Our goal is to show a more refreshing image of blacks through their challenges and their successes, but also provide useful information that will help create a healthier and stronger community.

AfriLne.Net

AfriLne.Net, AfriLne AfriLne.Net AfriLne.Net - Africa Web Directory is about business link in Africa

Afrique & Science

Afrique & Science Afrique & Science Weekly Newspaper devoted to Science & Technology in Africa- – Pour la promotion de l'esprit scientifique en Afrique. Africa & Science/Afrique & Science is a platform which aims at contributing to the promotion of the scientific culture in Africa through the dissemination of locally produced knowledge and the advertisement in the continent of any scientific information that may constitute an important input to the development of our communities. Inspired by several years of debates as part of the German-based NGO African Development Initiative, Africa & Science/Afrique & Science is indeed the translation into actions of the goodwill of its promoters to strengthen the culture of rationality, the spirit of scientific research and the importance of techno-science in Africa. Considering the strong pregnancy of the « hidden », the “mysterious” in the collective consciousness of Africans, this forum intends to contribute to the reduction/decrease of the influence of the « invisible » and the « irrational » in our communities. Our intention in the long-run is of course to eradicate irrational believes in African mentalities. We believe that even « magic making » is a scientific knowledge. Therefore, our duty as scientists is to deconstruct its process, to tame it as an object of science. In addition to our duty of regular coverage of scientific events in Africa, one of the key missions of Africa & Science/Afrique & Science is the publishing of research works of African based scholars. By imposing ourselves the duty of editing African scholars, we intend to contribute to bring light on the tremendous works that African scholars daily realize, but which remain largely unknown from the world scientific community mostly because of their non access to established channels or because of the lack of financial resources. We will be very thankful if we could benefit from your co-operation in the constant improvement of the quality of our services. Your criticisms as well as suggestions will be really appreciated. Afrique & Science/Africa & Science est une tribune qui entend contribuer à la promotion de la culture scientifique en Afrique par la vulgarisation du savoir produit localement et la diffusion sur le continent de toute information scientifique pouvant être d’un intérêt pour le développement de nos sociétés. Inspirée des longues années de réflexions menées dans le cadre des activités de l’organisation non gouvernementale African Development Initiative, Afrique & Science/Africa & Science est en quelque sorte la matérialisation de la volonté de ses promoteurs de renforcer en l’homme Africain la culture de la rationalité, le goût de la recherche scientifique, l’importance de la techno-science, etc. Tenant compte de la place qu’occupe aujourd’hui l’« occulte » dans la conscience collective des populations africaines, cette tribune entend contribuer à la réduction de la prégnance de l’« invisible », de l’« irrationnel » dans nos sociétés; l’objectif à long terme étant bien sûr l’élimination de la croyance en l’irrationnel dans les mentalités africaines. Nous sommes d’avis que même la « magie » est un savoir, et notre mission en tant qu’homme de science est de la comprendre, de l’apprivoiser en tant qu’objet de science. Outre son devoir de couverture régulière de l’actualité scientifique sur le continent, Afrique & Science/Africa & Science se donne également pour principale mission d’éditer les œuvres des chercheurs africains vivant en Afrique. En nous attribuant ce devoir d’édition, nous entendons ainsi contribuer à apporter de la lumière sur le travail gigantesque qu’abattent les universitaires africains, mais qui demeure encore largement inconnu de la communauté scientifique mondial, généralement par défaut de canaux de diffusion, ou tout simplement par manque de ressources financières. À nos lectrices et lecteurs, nous formulons le vœu de coopération en vue de l’amélioration constante de la qualité de nos prestations. Vos critiques et suggestions nous permettront de mieux vous servir, de mettre à votre disposition des informations de qualité.

Afrique Expansion Inc.

Afrique Expansion Inc. Afrique Expansion Inc. Créée en 1995, Afrique Expansion Inc. est une firme de consultants en communication et développement international dont la mission est de promouvoir les relations et les partenariats d’affaires entre les entreprises canadiennes et africaines. En 1998, face à une demande accrue d’informations sur les marchés nord-américains et africains, l’entreprise décide de lancer une revue, Afrique Expansion Mag, ayant pour objectifs d’une part de présenter l’immense potentiel économique des pays africains et de sensibiliser les entrepreneurs et les investisseurs nord-américains sur les opportunités d’affaires offertes par ces marchés, et d’autre part, de faire découvrir aux entreprises et pays africains l’expertise et le savoir-faire nord-américains et les énormes possibilités de financement et de partenariats existant dans le Nouveau Monde. Aujourd’hui, après 20 ans ans d’existence, même si Afrique Expansion est restée fidèle à sa vocation première qui est de favoriser le développement des échanges commerciaux entre l’Afrique et le Canada, elle a recentré ses activités autour de la communication, des relations publiques et du service-conseil. Pour mener à bien sa mission, l’entreprise s’appuie sur une solide équipe de professionnels possédant une expertise reconnue en communication, en relations publiques et en commerce international ainsi que sur son vaste réseau de contacts dans les milieux des affaires au Canada et en Afrique. Produits et Services Media planning Achat d’espaces dans les journaux et du temps d’antenne à la télé, conception et production des spots publicitaires, rédaction des articles destinés aux médias nord-américains. Relations publiques Lobbying auprès des gouvernements, des organismes publics et des leaders d’opinion. Organisation des événements Déjeuner-conférence et dîner-gala, journées économiques des pays africains au Canada, expositions. Communication multimédia Création, hébergement et mise à jour des sites Web, réservation des noms de domaine, production d’émissions et de documentaires, création publicitaire. Commerce international Importation et exportation de biens ou services-Canada/Afrique) et identification des clients en Afrique et au Canada pour vos produits et services. Conseils stratégiques Élaboration de plans marketing et de plans d’affaires, recherche de financement, planification des campagnes de communication, etc. Accueil spécialisé Accueil spécialisé et accompagnement de dignitaires et entreprises au Canada et en Afrique.

Afro - Asia

Afro - Asia Afro - Asia Afro-Ásia is, since 1965, the biannual journal of the Center for Afro-Oriental Studies at Federal University of Bahia (Salvador, Brazil). This publication is dedicated to the dissemination of studies on Asian and African people, and their descendants in Brazil and elsewhere. The journal occupies an important place in Brazilian academic life as it is one of the few national publications devoted mostly to African and Afro-diasporic issues in a country known for the strength of African influence in its culture and history. Papers published in Afro-Ásia have promoted and scholarly thinking and debates on such topics as the history of slavery, race relations and the complex processes of identity construction, and have also produced significant data to inform progressive attitude against racism and racial inequality in our society.

Afro Bolivians - Bolivians of African Ancestry

Afro Bolivians, Bolivians of African Ancestry Afro Bolivians - Bolivians of African Ancestry Most, if not all, were brought as slaves to work for European colonizers. African slaves may even have been a part of Francisco Pizzaro’s expeditions in Upper and Lower Peru. They originated in different areas of Africa, including Congo, Angola, Senegal, Mozambique, Ivory Coast, and Ghana, and in most cases were brought to Upper Peru from Lima or Buenos Aires, cities that did a lively trade with slave merchants. Afro-Bolivians have always had a strong sense of being negros (their preferred term), and of possessing cultural and linguistic values that set them apart from the remainder of their compatriots, indigenous and mestizo. Afro-Bolivians celebrating over an allocation of land "HAY NEGRITUD DEBAJO DEL ECUADOR ~ THERE'S BLACKNESS BELOW THE EQUATOR" The history of Blacks in Bolivia dates from colonial-era Peru, when Africans were imported as slaves to labor in the silver mines of the Peruvian viceroyalty. By the turn of the seventeenth century hundreds of thousands of Africans had been imported into Spanish America (Bowser 1974, 37), and by 1611 some 6,000 Black and Mulato slaves worked the upper Peruvian mines of Potosí (Klein 1986, 32). Africans were also imported as slave labor to work coca-leaf plantations in the semitropical provinces of Nor Yungas and Sud Yungas (M. Léons 1978). Emancipation was legislated in Bolivia's constitution of 19 December 1827; political debates delayed its enforcement until 1851. Afro-Bolivians typically refer to themselves as "Negros" (Blacks). Black intellectuals introduced the term "Afro-Boliviano" in the last quarter of the twentieth century, and by the early 1990s the term has found its way into usage among Black urban migrants living in La Paz and more generally among Bolivia's intelligentsia. "Negrito" (Little Black) and "Moreno" (Brown) are the terms most commonly used by Bolivians when referring to Blacks; however, Blacks find the diminutive offensive. Afro-Bolivians use the term "Mulato" to refer to a Black of a lighter skin color. "Mulato" in its more common usage in Bolivia refers to the the offspring of Whites or Hispanics and Black people. "Zambo" refers to someone of mixed Indian and Black parentage; it is mainly used derogatorily. Location. There are Afro-Bolivian communities throughout Bolivia, especially in the semitropical climates of the departments of La Paz, Santa Cruz, Beni, and Cochabamba. The largest concentrations of Blacks are found in the lowland provinces of Nor Yungas and Sud Yungas in the department of La Paz. Several communities of Black agriculturists are located in each of these provinces, such as Chicaloma and Chulumani in Sud Yungas and Mururata and Tocaña in Nor Yungas. The Bolivian Yungas are characterized by heavy rainfall and a mean temperature of 23°C. Besides rural agricultural communities, there are migrant communities of Afro-Bolivians in all major Bolivian cities. In La Paz, Afro-Bolivians live mainly on the outskirts of town, especially in the rapidly growing areas of El Alto and Villa Fatima. Because of inconsistent migration patterns, there are no well-defined Afro-Bolivian neighborhoods in La Paz. As migrants from rural villages arrive in La Paz, they settle in the poorest neighborhoods. Participation in social activities, music ensembles being the most important example, is central to Afro-Bolivians' establishment of a subjective sense of community. These groups are based on common origin, for example the province of Nor Yungas. They chose a central location within the city to meet, thus keeping transportation costs and accessibility approximately equal for all members. Demography. Estimates of the population of Afro-Bolivians range as low as 6,000 to as high as 158,000, or 2 percent of Bolivia's population. These estimates vary widely because census figures for Bolivia do not include racial differentiations. Afro-Bolivian kids (23 September every year has been declared as National Day of Afro-Bolivian people.) Linguistic Affiliation. Afro-Bolivians throughout Bolivia speak mostly Spanish. The Spanish spoken by rural Black agriculturists is a dialect, and Afro-Bolivians maintain a small vocabulary of words of African origin. In the province of Sud Yungas and, to a lesser extent, in Nor Yungas, Blacks also speak the Aymara language. The semitropical provinces of Nor Yungas and Sud Yungas are located on the eastern side of the Andes; the mountainous topography is dense with vegetation. Afro-Bolivian communities in Nor Yungas include Tocaña, Mururata, and Chischipa. Coroico is the nearest regional town and political center, and several Afro-Bolivian families live and work there. In Sud Yungas are the villages of Chulumani, Irupana, and Chicaloma, which is also known as pueblo de los negros (village of the Blacks). Like most rural Bolivian villages, Afro-Bolivian villages have a small plaza circumscribed by a church, a schoolhouse, and one or more stores. In the Afro-Bolivian village of Tocaña, homes are scattered up and down the sides of a small mountain and connected by footpaths. Each dwelling consists of either a single two-story adobe structure or two to three separate single-story structures. The living, sleeping, and dining areas are together under one steel roof, and they are non-compartmentalized. If a house has a second story, it is commonly a storage area. As a separate structure, the kitchen can be as simple as a covered fireplace, or it can be a complete rectangular adobe building with a thatched or steel roof and a door. Single-story homes often have a third structure used as a storage room. Each household sits on a small plot of land (less than one-tenth of a hectare). Families also have more substantial plots of land (up to 1.5 hectares) that they farm. As of 1992 there was no potable water system in Tocaña, nor was there electricity or adequate sanitation facilities such as household latrines. In the city of La Paz, Afro-Bolivian migrants live throughout the poorest neighborhoods. If they have a house, it sits on a small plot of land (less than one-tenth of a hectare) and is typically of brick and enclosed by a brick wall. The central living and dining area is one large room, with the sleeping area separated by a wall or a curtain. The kitchen is often separated from the house. As of 1992, most migrant Afro-Bolivian families lacked necessities such as electricity and adequate sanitation. Subsistence and Commercial Activities: Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas and Sud Yungas are primarily agriculturists. Cash crops include coca leaf, coffee, citrus fruits, cacao, and many varieties of bananas and plantains. Coca leaf is the primary crop; it is a durable plant, and the same fields can be harvested several times each year. Coca leaves are hand picked and dried in the sun before being bagged. Afro-Bolivians refer to each 30-pound bag as a sexto, and these bags are brought to regional markets, such as those in Caranavi and Coroico, where they are exchanged for cash. The cash value of coca leaves fluctuates dramatically throughout the year depending on the size, color, and quality of the leaves. During the harvest of citrus fruits and coffee, trucks arrive directly from La Paz to carry the produce to markets. Truck owners act as middlemen, paying Afro-Bolivians a small fraction of what the produce sells for in the city. Rural Afro-Bolivians partially subsist on their crops and the chickens they raise. Men hunt wild game, and to further complement their diet and add variety, both men and women travel regularly by truck to large regional markets. Besides food, they purchase clothing and household, agricultural, school, and other supplies. Owing to racism, Afro-Bolivian migrants have a difficult time finding decent jobs in the city of La Paz. Both women and men are often able to get work as domestic servants; however, it is more difficult for men to secure this type of employment. Some men find jobs as shop clerks or professional drivers. Some migrants maintain important links with relatives in the lowland Yungas villages. By traveling back to their villages, working in the fields during harvests, and trading store-bought goods with their friends and relatives, migrants return to the city with agricultural produce such as citrus fruits, bananas, and plantains. Division of Labor. Adults and children work year-round at agricultural tasks. Men often organize themselves in groups of two to six and work in their different fields on a rotating basis. The work includes chopping, thrashing, and burning of trees and large brush; clearing fields; and tilling so that the fields can be planted. Women work in smaller groups while simultaneously caring for preschool-age children. Women participate in all but the heaviest chopping and clearing of fields; they mainly plant and harvest. Besides their agricultural and child-care responsibilities, women cook, do the laundry, and wash the dishes. Both men and women shop at the weekly markets. Land Tenure. Both men and women inherit land, and each family often has several different plots that they work. Ideally, each family will have plots in different environments on the mountain. Most families have coca-leaf fields on the sunny or dry side of the mountain, and other fields in the denser jungle where they grow bananas and plantains. Kinship: Afro-Bolivians reckon kinship bilaterally. They refer to one another by endearing nicknames (e.g., "Mastuco," meaning "large" or "full-bodied"), by relationship— abuela (grandmother), tio (uncle), suegra (mother-in-law), and the like—and by fictive or ritual kinship terms such as comadre (comother) and compadre (cofather). Compadrazgo is an important fictive-kinship institution among Afro-Bolivians, and such relationships are formed for the sponsorship of weddings, baptisms, the raising of a roof, and even the purchase of an automobile. Marriage and family:Although legal marriage is common among Afro-Bolivians, a couple often lives together and has children for several years before they can afford to marry. Divorce and serial polygamy are not uncommon among Afro-Bolivians. After divorce women often remain single and raise children, whereas men migrate to another part of the country in search of work and sometimes remarry. Aymara-speaking Blacks of South Yungas frequently intermarry with Aymara Indians and mestizos, a strategy to elevate the social status of their children (M. Léons 1978). Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas, however, are by and large endogamous. Interethnic relations between Blacks and the Aymara are quite different in Nor Yungas. Although some Aymara families live in mainly Black agricultural communities, there is often racial tension between the two groups, and intermarriage is infrequent. Socialization. Young children accompany their mothers during the day as they work in the fields: it is the mother who is mainly responsible for rearing and disciplining children. Children attend primary school in their own communities and secondary school in a nearby regional town. Because of the distance, teenagers attending high school often live with a relative in town or find room and board, returning to their families only for weekends. Socio-political organization:The Afro-Bolivian community of Tocaña has a democratic syndicate political system similar to those found in rural communities throughout Bolivia. In 1952, when agrarian reform was instituted in Bolivia, the government authorized these local political organizations as a replacement for the outlawed hacienda (plantation) administrations (W. Léons 1977, 31). Syndicates are hierarchic boards of political secretaries elected by adult community members. The secretary general holds the position of leadership in the community and may retain it for consecutive one-year terms, provided the community is content with his or her performance and the individual is willing to continue to hold office. Local syndicates are intended to give agricultural communities political representation at regional and national levels. Melina Avendaño, born in Cochabamba on December 2, 1985. She is the daughter of a Yungas and Chuquisaca, lived from age 3 in the city of Sucre where he earned the title Queen of Sport 2003 and Miss Body Fitness 2005. The 2007 made history by becoming the first (and so far only) Afro-Bolivian who has participated in the Miss Bolivia, Miss toting band Chuquisaca. From 21 years old and was a student of Laboratory Medicine at the Universidad San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, Melina fulfilled one of his goals to represent our department in the national pageant, calling the attention of the press from previous activities, entered Quickly favorite group on the final night and reached the position of second runner. Another form of political organization pertains to social activities, such as sports and music. These organizations form the basis for community solidarity. The officers of these groups—presidents, vice presidents, secretaries of conflicts, and treasurers—are called dirigentes (directors). Although there are local and national governmental organizations in place in La Paz, migrants have recourse only to these social organizations; hence for migrants these serve as the central political organizations. In 1992 women held most of these offices through which they both organized social life and addressed economic concerns. In Sud Yungas, Blacks rejected the syndicate political system. The small sizes of their settlements were not conducive to the syndicate organization, and, additionally, Blacks viewed the syndicate as an Indian institution. In Chicaloma, Afro-Bolivians replaced the local hacienda administration with a junta, a cooperative work group. This allowed them political autonomy such as the Aymara have through syndicates and was commensurate with the dispersed nature of Afro-Bolivian settlements. Juntas draw their membership from a cross section of age groups (W. Lions 1977, 32). Conflict. There is competition and racial tension between the Aymara and Afro-Bolivian migrants in La Paz and, to a lesser degree, between the Aymara and rural Afro-Bolivians. In the city of La Paz, Afro-Bolivians face heightened forms of racism and discrimination in their daily lives. Afro-Bolivians are in direct competition for jobs with Aymara Indians, who are the largest ethnic group in La Paz. As early as the days of colonial slavery in the highland mines of Potosí, the Aymara mocked Black cultural traditions, especially in a dance (performed in blackface while drumming and singing) called saya or tundiki. These Aymara dance practices continue in the 1990s and are one source of racial tension between Afro-Bolivians and Aymara in La Paz. Migrants attend informal public forums that they call debates, where they openly address their grievances with the Aymara and express their experiences of being a small Black minority in a country dominated by Indians. Among their complaints are the superstitious beliefs some Bolivians have regarding Blacks (e.g., that seeing a Black person or offering one a glass of milk can bring good luck). The saya or tundiki occasions much resentment. At debates held in 1992, Afro-Bolivians said they felt marginalized and that they believed that Aymara migrants had better job opportunities than did Blacks. LA PAZ, BOLIVIA - FEBRUARY 15: Afro-Bolivian members from Yungas region dance at the official stage as part of the 55 Jiska Anata groups parade during the 2010 carnival on February 15, 2010 in La Paz, Bolivia. ?El Chuta? is a traditional prehispanic dance practiced in La Paz and its surroundings. (Photo by Jose Luis Quintana/LatinContent/Getty Images) Religious Beliefs. Like most Bolivians, Afro-Bolivians are Christians. Most rural Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas, however, attend the regional Catholic church in the town of Coroico only for baptisms and other life-cycle ceremonies. A priest from Coroico occasionally visits outlying agricultural communities such as Tocaña and Mururata to say Mass. Like most rural Bolivian villages, each Afro-Bolivian village has a patron saint, and communites celebrate their patron saints with fiestas lasting up to several days According to local mythology, during Bolivia's independence struggle (1809-1825), the Virgen de la Candelaria saved the people of Coroico from an army of Royalists sent by the Spanish Crown. Surrounded, the unarmed vecinos (local non-indigenous Spanish speakers) abandoned their homes and went to church to pray. Afro-Bolivians, along with all the people of the region, celebrate 20 October as the day the Virgen de la Candelaria descended from the sky on a cloud, and, with her army of patriotos (patriots), defeated the Royalist forces. The largest regional patron-saint fiesta is in the town of Coroico. Afro-Bolivians contribute to the celebrations of the Virgen de la Candelaria by singing a song dedicated to her. This song is part of their saya music tradition (see "Arts"). Alejandro Fernandez Gutierrez, “Santo Patrono San Benito,” a procession of the saint’s image in the Aymara and Afro-Bolivian town of Coripata, La Paz, 2009. This celebration is one of many held annually throughout Central and South America for San Benito de Palermo, especially in areas with historically Black populations. In Kinky Gazpacho: Life, Love & Spain, author and journalist Lori L. Tharps writes, Professor [Isidoro] Moreno had explained that the [African] slaves [in Spain, since the mid-1400s] had their own confraternities or religious brotherhoods, which was one of the only ways they could exercise some control over their lives. They could gather freely in the church and participate in the same holy day festivals as the Spaniards and conduct their business with some autonomy… On one side of the church I found a small statue of someone who I assumed was a Black saint. He had dark skin, wore a gold-tinged robe, and carried a heart and a cross in his hands. At his feet were two ceramic pots with fresh flowers. The white and blue pots both read “Hmdad de los Negritos” (Brotherhood of the Blacks). The plaque under the statue read “San Benito de Palermo.” Apparently he was the patron saint of this brotherhood. I almost wept with emotion, realizing that the slaves’ existence in Seville had been preserved. My people had stood in this church, sung here, and worshiped here…How was it possible, I wondered, that when I asked some random people on the street why this church was called the “Chapel of the Little Black People,” they had no idea. …Los Negritos have since 1888 been dominated by whites, without a black face to be seen. Ceremonies. The Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas have a ceremonial monarchy, which is part of a long lineage of kings. Earlier in the twentieth century, King Bonifacio Pinedo, who lived in the village of Mururata, was recognized as the Afro-Bolivian king. He wore a cape and crown for major celebrations, especially Easter. When King Bonifacio died in the 1960s, no immediate heir to his throne was crowned until his grandson Julio Pinedo became king in 1982. Arts. Among both Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas and Afro-Bolivian migrants in La Paz, music, dance, and poetry are the most important forms of artistic expression. In 1982 Afro-Bolivians of Nor Yungas revitalized much of their traditional music. Before this, they participated in the brass-band tradition that became so important to Bolivians during the mid-to late twentieth century. Among the revitalized traditions are saya, a song genre that serves Afro-Bolivians as a means of maintaining and transmitting their oral history; mauchi (funeral music); baile de tierra (traditional wedding music); and zemba, a lively combination of drumming and dance that was formerly associated with the Afro-Bolivian monarchy (Pizarroso Cuenca 1977, 73). Singing is the most prominent aspect of Afro-Bolivian music. All of the genres except mauchi include accompaniment by several different drums, and saya adds bells and scrapers. The manufacture of musical instruments is considered an art, and community instrument makers are recognized for their talents. Especially important are saya drums, long bamboo scrapers called cuanchas, and colorful drum mallets called haucañas (an Aymara term). Saya drums are of three different sizes, and each plays a unique rhythm that interlocks with the other two. The largest drums are the asentadores, and, as the name suggests, they "set" the beat. Second in size are cambiadores, which interlock a triplet pattern with the basic duple established by the asentadores. The smallest drum is the gangengo, which interlocks an upbeat pattern with the asentador. Afro-Bolivian Drummers - Saya Drums In the saya tradition, both men and women dance, but they form two separate dancing groups. The captain of the dancers wears sets of bells around his legs. The bells worn around his left leg are pitched higher, and they lead the women dancers. On his right leg, the captain wears a lower-pitched set of bells that lead the men. Afro-Bolivians point out that the bells also symbolize the chains and shackles worn by their enslaved ancestors. Both the writing and reciting of poetry are highly valued forms of artistic expression. In Tocaña and La Paz, community poets recite during brief interludes at public musical performances. Their poetry often addresses Afro-Bolivians' struggles against racism and discrimination. Death and Afterlife: Afro-Bolivians consider their mauchi tradition to be a vestige of a lost Afro-Bolivian religious practice. Mauchi is sung by men after a burial as friends and relatives walk back to their village from the cemetery, and it is sung on Todos los Santos (2 November). In mauchi, men join their hands together and form a large, closed circle. One community elder leads the unaccompanied singing, and the other men respond. source: http://www.everyculture.com/South-America/Afro-Bolivians.html further readings:http://www.personal.psu.edu/jml34/afrobol5.pdf http://lacc.fiu.edu/hemisphere/hemisphere_vol_18.pdf Afro-Bolivian Royalty JUNE 20, 2011 BY ANDRES SCHIPANI Bolivia has a king. And he is not one of indigenous descent, but surprisingly, African. Julio Pinedo—one of the many Afro-Bolivians who make a living growing coca—found out a few years ago that he is a direct descendant of Bonifaz, a tribal king from Central Africa. Now, he’s the country’s first Afro-Bolivian king in 500 years. Julio Pinedo is the first Afro-Bolivian king in 500 years “I had no idea about my royal lineage,” he says, humbly. “I knew my ancestors were, like other Africans, brought to work in the Bolivian gold and silver mines of Potosí. But because of the weather—it was too cold for the Africans to stay there—the Spaniards realized that they were losing slaves and had to move the ‘Afros’ to a place where the climate was friendlier.” It was his great-grandfather who moved from the mines to the coca fields in Los Yungas region. There, others recognized his royal lineage but protected his identity from the patrons. That is until a secret crowning of Julio’s grandfather, “Bonifacio I,” in 1932. His grandfather, who was then leading the personnel at a country estate, raised King Julio “Bonifacio” Pinedo. Years later, his crowning was not only a surprise for him as it was for many to find out that Afro-Latinos live in Bolivia. Julio Pinedo greets the audience after being crowned as the Afro-Bolivian king by members of the community of African descendents that live in near La Paz, Bolivia. So then, in what some label as a political move to make the world aware of the Afro-Bolivian presence, the community decided to go big and crown him at a ceremony in the country’s capital, La Paz, in December 2007. The dances, chants and drums of their ‘Saya’ music, inundated the city for a whole morning. “It was a glorious day,” the shy and silent King recalls from the small village of Mururata. But this royal picture is not as glossy as it seems. Most Afro-Bolivians, including King Julio Pinedo, are poverty-stricken farmers that work all the year round, harvesting the coca leaves, citrus, coffee, banana or yucca, and hacking into the hard red earth with hoes. They are the poorest group inside South America’s second-poorest country, after Guyana. Afro-Bolivians putting their culture on display. Photo: Courtesy of Andres Schipani. One of them is José Iriondo, who back in 1967 fought with the Argentine-Cuban revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara in eastern Bolivia. “When I was with Che I learned that we have to fight till the end. And I am now still fighting for the rights of the Afro-Bolivians, because we have to keep fighting,” he says. Today, he works seven days a week and earns less than $30 a week, struggling to make ends meet. Until recently more than 35,000 poverty-stricken Afro-Bolivians, like Mr. Iriondo, felt overlooked and even discriminated against. But now, for the first time since they arrived in Bolivia as slaves in the sixteenth century, attitudes toward them seem to be slightly changing. He feels happy that Afro-Bolivians are now recognized by the new Constitution pushed for by the country’s first indigenous president, Evo Morales, and passed by national referendum in January 2009. And now, finally, they have representation. Protest for Afro-Bolivian rights in Sucre. Jorge Medina used to run the Centro Afroboliviano para el Desarrollo Integral y Comunitario (CADIC) until he was elected as the first-ever Afro-Bolivian congressman a year-and-a-half ago. “I feel proud of being Afro-Bolivian and now, most of all, of representing my people. At last, we have an Afro-Bolivian with a voice,” he explains, adding that “the fact that we back this process of change led by an indigenous president does not mean the Afro-Bolivians are from the party of this indigenous president, simply that this process of change is allowing us and other voiceless peoples to show ourselves.” Jorge Medina Barra,Afro-Bolivian leader Now, that they have grown stronger, they have developed links with several networks of Afro-descendants, mostly in Latin America and the Caribbean. “We are now working together on issues such as racial equality, to stop with racial discrimination, xenophobia, and intolerance around the region. We still have to work on that, Bolivia is still a racist country on several fronts.” So nonetheless, despite the reforms adopted by President Morales to end discrimination against indigenous people and other vulnerable groups, such as the Afro-Bolivians, Mr. Medina warns the Afros are still at a disadvantage. “So we cannot rest, we still have to keep fighting for our rights; there is still discrimination and racism and people that want to put us down.” Back in his town of Mururata, King Julio Pinedo feels “good and tranquil” in his role of having to be always watching over the needs of the Afro-Bolivian communities. But he echoes Mr. Medina’s views, and feels there is still some way to go: “We were slaved but we are not slaves anymore. Yet it is complicated because not many people understand us, and what we are fighting for.” source:http://americasquarterly.org/node/2604

Afro Brazilian Cultural Center of New Jersey

Afro Brazilian Cultural Center of New Jersey Afro Brazilian Cultural Center of New Jersey Afro Brazilian Cultural Center of New Jersey & Capoeira Guerreiros is ...

Afro Europe International Blog

Afro Europe International Blog Afro Europe International Blog The Afropean is a new online multimedia, multidisciplinary journal exploring the social, cultural and aesthetic interplay of black and European cultures, and the synergy of styles and ideas brought about because of this union. After winning an ENAR Award for our contribution towards a racism-free Europe with our Afropean Culture Facebook page, we hope to build on the work of Erik Kambel's important Afro-Europe blog, which closed in 2013, and will continue to shed light on art, music, literature, news and events from the Afro-European diaspora, as well as produce and commission original essays and projects. We currently have in our journal three unique perspectives on what the term means as a cultural identifier. You can read some excerpts below. We explore Afropean style through an interview with British Nigerian TV Host Andy Akinwolere and a photo essay shot in Shoreditch, London. And we have a calendar of Afro-Europe related talks, calls for papers, exhibitions, events and gigs in our Agenda section.

Afro European Sisters Network (AESN)

Afro European Sisters Network, AESN Afro European Sisters Network (AESN) Afro European Sisters Network (AESN) focuses on networking black women in and outside of Europe. As women tell their stories it allows others to learn lessons from their lives. Sharing this knowledge will also empower women with the ability to become one.

AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS

AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS, AFRO AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS in Washington DC is

Afro-European Medical and Research Network (AEMRN)

Afro-European Medical and Research Network, AEMRN Afro-European Medical and Research Network (AEMRN) The Network now in Special Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) - http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/- is Non-Governmental and non-profit Organisation with a strong vision of helping to improve the quality of life for people from and living in resource limited settings. It has Bern Switzerland as overall and European headquarters and Liberia as Africa Regional headquarters. Projects in health, food security etc. have been initiated in various resource-limited countries especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Its members strive to contribute to the medical, mental, social, educational and every sound well-being of mankind irrespective of race, creed, beliefs, faith and social affiliation. AEMRN serves as a platform wherein active professionals from such disciplines as education, medicine, engineering, nursing, faith-based can interact at various levels of self-initiated conferences, seminars, workshops, exchange programmes and voluntary workcamps. We endeavour to share ideas and knowledge for the betterment of the less fortunate human sectors of the world mainly from and living in poor-resource settings. As a team, we synergize our efforts to maximize our output and reach out to needy communities. AEMRN team offer them our services whilst at the same time forstering and promoting cross-cultural exchange and Global Peace both within our own multinational and multi-professional team as well as the people we will be interacting with to help. The members of AEMRN are aware of the fact that there are people with very good learnt trade and profession living under diverse conditions in different parts of the world who, due to one reason or another, are unable to put into useful purpose both for themselves and their communities. AEMRN members identify, reach out to such people, encourage and empower them to take part in continuous professional development programmes so that the stimulus of their learnt trade can be rekindled, improved and once again contribute to the development of their community and the world at large. We collaborate with human peace-loving organisations in diverse projects geared towards betterment of the poor people and enhancing their capacity building. We provide liason between international health organisations both in the West and the African counterparts so that as a combined group we can at various levels augment one another's effort to fight Communicable diseases especially HIV/AIDS as well as non-communicable ones. The necessary bridge between health, education and environment has urged our communication and language department to develop beside interpreters training, conflict resolution and mediation know-how as well as tourist-guiding facilities. This ambitious vision is in response to multifaceted challenges awaiting Diaspora Africans and our team. As a contribution to the future of the world, we have set ourselves the inescapable duty to forge, the dedicated mission to nurture and the long lasting will to further our goals.

Afro-Germanica Online

Afro-Germanica Online Afro-Germanica Online About Afro-Germanica Online: This is a personal learning journey intended to educate myself and others on the accomplishments, history, and philosophies of AfroGermans past and present. I started this blog to educate myself and others as I learn about Black Germans (AfroDeutsche) of prominence, and also those who are not so prominent and shed light on their endeavors. As part of the overall African Diaspora, German Blacks have had a unique cultural experience throughout history, as we come from not only many nations but many viewpoints. I hope to explore many of the people and philosophies associated with this unique cultural group of which I can proudly say I am a member.

Afro-People & Friends

Afro-People & Friends Afro-People & Friends Africans, African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinas and friends! Come together to hangout, network and meet fellow cool Afro People in New York City! We're about: Africana · Black Women · Dining Out · New In Town · Travel · Black Professionals · Book Club · Nightlife · Black Entrepreneurs · Vacations · African Culture · African American, African & Caribbean Arts Culture · African Diaspora · Friends of Africa · Africans

Afro-Vision Experience

Afro-Vision Experience, the Afro-Vision Experience, african diaspora Afro-Vision Experience The Afro-Vision Experience Afro-Vision.com may contain materials obtained from numerous, different sources. Discretion and common sense should be used in pursuing the many linked, rich sites shared herein. Remember, the internet can take you where you want to go and, where you don’t want to go. Please preview sites that you want to share with your students, family members, and friends. Users should seek permission from the copyright owner for all uses that are not allowed by "Fair Use" and other provisions of the U.S. Copyright Act. Users should assume that works are protected by copyright until they learn otherwise. Afro-Vision encourages use of its Web material by students and scholars for nonprofit educational and research purposes. For permission to use Afro-Vision copyrighted material, contact:

Afrocentricité Groupe d’influence – Afrocentricity Think Tank

Afrocentricité Groupe d’influence, Afrocentricity Think Tank Afrocentricité Groupe d’influence – Afrocentricity Think Tank Qui sommes-nous ? 1. Afrocentricité Groupe d’influence – Afrocentricity Think Tank 1.1 Il s’agit d’une association de personnalités ayant compris qu’il était important pour l’existence même de la pensée alternative des Africains et des Afro-descendants de présenter les faits sur la base des valeurs qui fondent l’Afrique ancestrale, à savoir le solidarisme, l’harmonie et le lien social et avec le cosmos. 1.2 Il est question d’apporter des éclairages alternatifs et originaux sur la marche du monde, vu du point de vue des Africains et des Afro-descendants. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que les auteurs sont exclusivement des Africains et des Afro-descendants, au contraire. Mais l’approche et les valeurs de l’occidento-centrisme ne semblent pas avoir fait progresser les Africains et des Afro-descendants vers leur unité et le panafricanisme. 1.3 Chacun doit pouvoir contribuer ou venir piocher des idées pour mieux assoir la longue marche de la déconstruction et de la reconstruction de son identité, de son savoir ancestrale afin de modeler son avenir en liaison avec la trajectoire en harmonie avec celle offerte par le Dieu Créateur. 2. Objectif de Afrocentricity Think Tank 2.1 Promouvoir l’interdépendance panafricaine en développant la conscience afrocentrique. 2.2 Contribuer à une prise de conscience continue de rôle positif des Africains et des Afro-descendants dans l’histoire passée et celle à venir. Il faut donc penser « afrocentrique » sans faire du « nombrilisme ». 2.3 Pour ce faire, décomplexer cette population et rappeler l’impératif du management dans un monde interdépendant où tolérance et enracinement ne peuvent que conduire à un monde de paix fondé sur un solidarisme intelligent. La palabre y est de rigueur avec un objectif affiché de résultat dans des délais impartis. Ce travail de diffusion du savoir et du savoir-faire à des fins de maturité identitaire épousera toutes les formes modernes d’échanges : du simple texte aux participations multiples à des fora, séminaires, conférences et actions d’influence à tous les niveaux. 2.4 Ce groupe d’influence s’inscrit dans une logique de réseautage et de soutien à de nombreuses autres initiatives de promotion de l’afrocentricité et de la culture positives des Africains et des Afro-descendants. 2.5 Le débat est libre, pluriel, contradictoire et courtois. 2.6 Les contributions sont en principe en français et en anglais avec des possibilités de traduction instantanée électronique sur ce site (traduction officieuse). 2.7 Le contact se fait par info@afrocentricity.info.

AfroCubaWeb

AfroCubaWeb AfroCubaWeb Many people don't know that an estimated 70% of Cubans have African ancestors.... Today the island contains priceless survivals of African cultures - Yoruba, Congo, Old Dahomey, and the Efik/Efo from the Cross River Delta (Nigeria), giving birth to Abakwa and Brikamo. In addition, Cuba hosts a number of communities from the diaspora, especially the Caribbean -- Jamaica, the Bahamas, and other English speaking islands as well as Haiti. AfroCubaWeb contains pages about: Abaku? - Cross River Delta, Nigeria and Cuba; Haiti in Cuba: over 300,00 Haitians in Cuba, Creole radio station; Native Cubans; West Indians in Cuba; Rumba; Rastas in Cuba; Reggaet?n Cubano - Cubaton; Yoruba - Lukumi; Congo. Each community maintains a certain identity through language, music, dance, religion, and membership organizations ranging from the cabildos (casa templos), self-help associations dating from the days of slavery and organized under African rules, to the West Indian Welfare Center, which just celebrated its 50th anniversary. There is a wealth of culture for those discerning enough to look. Our aim is to help you do that by putting up as much material as we can. See our Table of Contents to access such major categories as Music, Author & Teachers on AfroCuban culture, Organizations that teach courses and workshops or are involved in the promotion of the African cultures of Cuba, as well as a number of other categories. In all, there are as of 2013 over 1,300 pages of information available on this web site.

AfroCubaWeb - AfroCuban

AfroCubaWeb AfroCubaWeb - AfroCuban "Many people don't know that an estimated 70% of Cubans have African ancestors..." Efo Nation flag from Matanzas (9486 bytes) Efo Flag - Matanzas Today the island contains priceless survivals of African cultures - Yoruba, Congo, Old Dahomey, and the Efik/Efo from the Cross River Delta (Nigeria), giving birth to Abakwa and Brikamo. In addition, Cuba hosts a number of communities from the diaspora, especially the Caribbean -- Jamaica, the Bahamas, and other English speaking islands as well as Haiti. Some pages that highlight these cultures Abakuá - Cross River Delta, Nigeria and Cuba Haiti in Cuba: over 300,00 Haitians in Cuba, Creole radio station Native Cubans West Indians in Cuba Rumba Rastas in Cuba Reggaetón Cubano - Cubaton Yoruba - Lukumi Congo Each community maintains a certain identity through language, music, dance, religion, and membership organizations ranging from the cabildos (casa templos), self-help associations dating from the days of slavery and organized under African rules, to the West Indian Welfare Center, which just celebrated its 50th anniversary. There is a wealth of culture for those discerning enough to look. Our aim is to help you do that by putting up as much material as we can. See our Table of Contents to access such major categories as Music, Author & Teachers on AfroCuban culture, Organizations that teach courses and workshops or are involved in the promotion of the African cultures of Cuba, as well as a number of other categories. In all, there are as of 2013 over 1,300 pages of information available on this web site. Cultural transmission imperiled The transmission of these African cultures is in peril. There has been a tremendous resurgence of interest in the cultures and the religions on the part of all Cubans, but for a number of reasons, including the lack of resources available inside Cuba to support an internal apprenticeship of the culture by the young from the old, the result has been incomplete initiations into the cultures. For various reasons, including the US blockade and internal racism, the Cuban educational system has not been able to work with the communities to develop such resources. Those who are within the cultures also suffer from lack of means such as video cameras, tape recorders, or even pen and paper, especially paper which will withstand the ravages of climate and insects. Outsiders come in and and do research but this doesn't necessarily support the internal apprenticeship. We therefore have what has been termed the "descomposicion" of the religion, its falling apart, much as DNA strands decompose under aging. There are many examples of this, including the passing of Luis Calle, holder of the Brikamo, in November, 1997. His very extensive knowledge was irreplaceable. Feed the roots We hope to support a "realimentacion," feeding the roots of these cultures. And help rescue from oblivion the more obscure and interesting elements now in danger of disappearing. Many of the Music pages are devoted to people whose passion is the recovery and maintenance of their old traditions. They have interesting ideas for doing this and many seek outside contact and collaboration. We will work with those who have a love for these cultures and appeal to those who go down to the island to bring back material such as you find on these pages. Since we are interested in showcasing AfroCuban culture, we can give you web space for this purpose. Everyone we talked to down there is very interested in being known on the net, so you will have no shortage of material if you ask. Just be sure to get addresses and phone numbers (likely of neighbors) so folks can be contacted as a result of their material. AfroCuban Culture Because everyone in Cuba is neither Black nor White, but Cuban, AfroCuban culture is in a difficult position. There are no web sites dedicated to it on the island. The Ministry of Culture funds many AfroCuban musical groups and artists, but generally does not allow efforts based on ethnic identity. This line of thinking combines hispanic denial around issues of race with the leftist inheritance of state building projects based on the French Republic, where what counts is citizenship. [See Nation and Multiculturalism in Cuba: A Comparison with the United States and Brazil by George Zarur for a discussion on this topic.] These forms of denial aggravate and feed ibero-spanish supremacist attitudes. Cuba's Music & Tourism Industry Sad to say, it is in something of a disarray. This is one potential source of revenue for cultural activities if handled correctly, both from the point of view of generating revenue and of doing it in a way that does not trample on cultural values as has happened with Santeria in New York. Tourists going to Cuba are basically sold sand and hotel rooms, not Cuban culture. The tourist industry is dominated by Europeans and Latin Americans who deprecate and minimize the value of African culture. There is still very little information available on Cuban web sites about carnavals, bands playing (this is changing, see Live Music in Cuba), clubs (especially clubs oriented towards Cubans). This dearth of information reaches truly abysmal proportions, even at major events such as the 1999 Havana Jazz Festival, where the playlist was only available two days before opening. The result of this is that tourists to Cuba are not repeat visitors, they tend to go once and move on to the next exotic destination for more fun on the beach. This flies in the face of the richness of Cuban culture and its musical heritage. Though it is legal to sell Cuban CDs in the US, there has been little organized effort on the part of the Cuban labels to do so, including a minimal on-line presence for ecommerce and none at all in the US market at places such as amazon.com. Politics We find plenty of fault to go around on both sides of the Florida Straights, where both establishments are top heavy with white leadership, the one in Miami even more so. We do not view the Cuban Government as an enemy, it is solidly in place and will remain there. They have taken a number of steps to reduce racism, they are acutely aware of the problem, especially at the higher levels. They do engage in the classic hispanic patterns of denial and avoidance, reaching such absurd levels as conducting a census based on ethnic self identification and pretending to believe the conclusion that Cuba is 65% white, a conclusion a person with modest powers of observation would deny after walking down virtually any street in Cuba! While we sympathize with the pain of black exile groups in the US, we note that some work closely with the white exile groups and tend to be funded through US government mechanism like NED (National Endowment for Democracy). Such an approach can be confrontational and counterproductive. We wonder what possesses them to make an alliance with the plantocracy, the Diaz-Balarts, the Bacardis, and the Fanjuls, all families whose fortunes are rooted in slavery. Some dissidents on the island have in the past also been funded by the US and have worked closely with the US Interests Section in Havana. Again, the approach tends to be confrontational and counterproductive. Cuba is a very complex place with regions having very different characteristics: Pinar del Rio in the west has far fewer Afrodescendientes than Oriente in the east. Havana and Oriente have more black leadership, while Matanzas, which has a very strong African presence, is stuck in el tiempo de España. Certain ibero-spanish individuals in the leadership have proven far more racist than others, and these have sometimes been sacked as a result, though in classic republican fashion, this is never given as the reason. Armando Hart comes to mind. Racism in Cuba is best confronted taking into account the parameters of allowed discourse, pushing where need be. It is counterproductive to threaten the existence of the state, which will naturally react in a strong fashion as a result, as does any state, especially when it is besieged by external enemies. Education, promotion of alternative views, persuasion, these are tools that can be effective in dealing with a moral scourge that is increasingly unacceptable the world around. Venezuela presents an opportunity in this dynamic: Hugo Chavez is of African descent, Native and European as well. The Africa centric point of view is far more accepted in Venezuela, where there are numerous black organizations and initiatives. Some of these have supported Chavez from early on and have his ear. Many Cubans travel to Venezuela, mostly to work there. There are reports of Venezuelans explaining to Cubans teachers coming to work in Venezuela what a far more enlightened approach to black history should look like and actually having some success in persuading them to adopt it, at least in Venezuela. Populations in Cuba Prior to the 2002 census, both the Cuban Government and the CIA Fact Book stated that Cuba's population of African descent was around 62%. Now they both claim 65% white, a remarkable convergence of views in such a rapid manner! The 62% may well have been an undercount. Much of the controversy in these figures, when they are debated, stems from the Cuban approach to racial categorization, which in turn derives from Latin culture. Mulatos (a term from animal husbandry) are counted separately and are not counted as "Black" so there is a tremendous undercount. There was a great deal of mixture in Cuba so mulatos are numerous. Even Fidel Castro, normally though of as white, is said to have had a mulata mother, who was the unmarried servant of his father. [See Victor Franco, The Morning After: A French Journalist's Impressions of Cuba Under Castro, trans. Ivan Kats and Philip Pendered (New York: Praeger, 1963). p. 79.] CIA Fact Book pre-2002 census entry: "Ethnic groups: mulatto 51%, white 37%, black 11%, Chinese 1%" (51+11=62...QED!) In closing, a salute We take this opportunity to express a special salute to all those Cubans who gave their energies and their lives in the wars of liberation in Southern Africa, remembering especially those who won the great victory at Cuito Cuanavale against the well equiped South African Defense Force and its Savimbi-led allies. This victory defended Angola against the supremacists as well as forced them to a settlement in Namibia and to a transition in South Africa. Let it not be forgotten. See Pedro Perez-Sarduy's poem Cumbite: "in memory of those who have struggled and fell for the Ngola of today."

Afrodescendant Population of Latin America II

Afrodescendant Population of Latin America II Afrodescendant Population of Latin America II Who We Are Submit PAAL2 We are working to change this The afrodescendants who represent between 20% and 30% of the population of Latin America, experience disproportionate levels of poverty and social exclusion and continue facing a severe discrimination on all levels. Despite the existence of national legal frameworks and the creation of diverse institutions to ensure that the afrodescendent population of Latin American is exercising its rights, the application of the laws and dispositions is weak and leaves us with much to do in the region. Particulary, the need to foster political and cultural recognition of their values, their aspirations and their way of life, is still lacking as this decreases cultural invisibility and enhances socioeconomic exclusion. ThIs creates more inequality, social segmentation and incomplete citizenship. And we are not alone The “Afrodescendant Population of Latin America II” regional project comes within the framework of the RBLAC/UNDP 2008-2013 Regional Programme, particularly in the democratic governance practice area, which among its objectives promotes inclusive participation and dialogue, especially of women and children, youth, people with disabilities, afrodescendants and indigenous peoples of Latin America. The project receives economic and technical support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway. Submit What is our purpose? To foster widened citizenship through the inclusive participation of afrodescendent populations and promote the recognition of their economic, political and social rights. To whom we address? Primarily to the afrodescendant populations from the countries of Latin America and their base organizations. The countries of the region will also benefit as their government officials will be invited to participate in project activities. With this proposal, social cohesion, equal development, human rights, and the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are recognized as essential factors for the achievement of a social life that enables the strengthening of the democracy of citizenship, aimed at moving toward the effective fulfillment of everyone’s rights, especially those disregarded sectors, while propelling the society’s welfare. Our goals To assess the degree of realization of political, civil, economic and social human rights of afrodescendant women and men of of Latin America taking also into account the gender perspective in order to contribute to the expansion of citizenship through inclusive participation of afrodescendant populations and the effective recognition of their human rights. To help to strengthen the organizations and the leadership of afrodescendant women and man contributing to the attainment of public policies destined to materialize the full citizenship of the afrodescendant population from a rights perspective that is also sensitive to gender. It will be taken into account that women and young afrodescendants, as long as their organizations, are present in all the activities. Expected outcomes To generate a new understanding about the reality of the afrodescendant in Latin America that may impact on the public policies that will be implemented by the countries of the region. To contribute to the strengthening of organizations and the consolidation of its leaderships in the knowledge of the rights of the afrodescendant population, the management of organizations and the formation of micro-entrepreneurs to achieve extended citizenship. Silvia Beatriz García Savino Project Coordinator

Afrodescendants d'Amérique Latine et des Caraibes

Afrodescendants d'Amérique Latine et des Caraibes Afrodescendants d'Amérique Latine et des Caraibes Plus de 2.600 communautés d'afrodescendants luttent au Brésil pour leur développement. 80% des jeunes assassinés sont noirs. Plus de 10 millions de péruviens sont afrodescendants, selon l'ancienne députée et actuelle membre du Bureau de Travail Afropéruvien du Congrès de la République , Martha Moyano Delgado. afroperuanos01 Lors d'une réunion avec d'autres organisations sociales, l'ancienne parlementaire a déclaré que les données statistiques ont été fournies par différentes ONG et elle a annoncé qu'en juin prochain se tiendra le IIème Congrès National des Afrodescendants, événement qui aura pour objectif d'adopter des mesures visant à renforcer leur organisation, solutionner leurs principaux besoins et reconnaitre tous leurs droits. Moyano a également signalé que le Bureau de Travail Afrodescendant travaille en coordinnation avec avec les autorités compétentes pour que lors du recensement de la population qui sera effectué en 2017, l'on prenne en compte de manière spéciale les données des personnes qui constituent la communauté afrodescendante dans le pays. Elle a également indiqué que ce recensement national implique encore plus si l'on requiert les données de la désormais vaste communauté afrodescendante, ce qui l'amènera à discuter avec les parlementaires membres de la Commission du Budget et du Compte Général de la République, pour qu'ils considèrent une petite augmentation du budget. Pour sa part, la représentante du Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement, Lizbet Vega, a indiqué que son organisation exécute un plan d'appui aux peuples afrodescendants, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les droits humains, le rejet de tout type de racisme et de la discrimination et le renforcement de l'intégration des leurs membres dès l'enfance jusqu'à l'âge adulte....

AfroEuro Foundation

AfroEuro Foundation AfroEuro Foundation AfroEuro Foundation is a Non-Governmental Organisation established in 2003. The organisation seeks to identify and build a positive image for African-European migrants living and working within Europe. It operates in both Netherlands and Ghana. The Head quarter is in The Hague. The organisation stand by the motto, “it’s possible” and “building bridges”. Our believe is that it’s possible for African migrants and other nationals, irrespective of their social class or economic background, can develop an adequate social capital and network if they work hard and develop a good social network. Mission and Objectives As an organisation, our mission is to create a forum for inter-cultural exchange between people of African origin and their host nations in the spirit of promoting the identity of African – Europeans. Our primary goal is to encourage and promote black students, youths, black professionals, artists, politicians among many others, to be involved in the community where they live in, and to be responsible citizens in taking vital but also challenging roles in all areas of life, be it business, economic or even politics. The objective of the organisation are: 1. To build the capacity of migrants in the Diaspora through mobilisation, sensitizations and promotional programmes to bridge existing gap between the North and the South. 2. To create a common platform for dialogue and a mutual understanding between African migrants’ communities and other nationals within Europe. 3. To create business opportunities for Migrants while facilitating their integration in host nations and re-integration in countries of origin.

Afroklectic

Afroklectic Afroklectic Afroklectic.com is an online space celebrating the emerging creative culture within the African-Australian community, Africa and the Diaspora. I was born in Australia to Ghanaian parents and found it very hard to find myself in the mix of the Australian and Ghanaian (African) culture. From a young age, I turned to creativity to find myself and maintain my culture. I followed through and pursued design at a tertiary level. Yet, I felt a backlash from the African community. Questions of why and looks of disapproval became the norm when I told African people I studied Visual Communications at University. At the time, I couldn?t really find people within my African-Australian community who were involved in the creative discourse and had the same issues. I found comfort in online spaces all based in countries other than Australia. As time went on, I started to notice an emergence creativity within the African-Australian community. I felt that there needed to be a space to promote this culture, a space to voice opinions, promote work and experiences of African-Australian creatives. So I started the Afroklectic blogspot, which has now evolved into Afroklectic.com.

Afronoire

Afronoire Afronoire AFRONOIRE is proudly setting the standards for the charismatic, stylish and creative black woman. AFRONOIRE is a UK-based online magazine that is fast-becoming the go-to lifestyle beauty, fashion and culture magazine for black British women. Since its online launch in February 2013, AFRONOIRE has been delivers engaging lifestyle-related content from an honest perspective and in a voice belonging to its audience. AFRONOIRE has come to be accepted and recognised as a credible source for black British women and has succeeded in generating a wide response from women internationally, from countries such as: Canada, United States and South Africa. AFRONOIRE.COM is regularly updated with a variety of topics, encompassing: hair/beauty, fashion/style, culture/music/cinema/events, career and wellbeing. fashion: designer spotlight, stylist spotlight, beauty: beauty spotlight, beauty edit, beauty tips culture: events, music, cinema, design and arts, people.

AfroShoot

AfroShoot AfroShoot AFRICAN PHOTOGRAPHERS ARE UNDER-REPRESENTED WE ARE HERE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE AfroShoot is a platform with the mission to foster the conversations between Africa & its diaspora to reach out to the world and share unseen narratives to the mainstream while supporting photographers and nurturing a new synergy. LISA AISSAOUI, FOUNDER LISA AISSAOUI is a French-Algerian creative polymath. Photographer by passion & at the beginning of the professions she has been doing an internship at 50Golborne Art Gallery in London. As Public Relation Manager at Open The Gate, cultural organisation aiming at promoting African cultures through music & arts, she has been highly active within the African communities in London. She is graduating in 2016 with a BA in Social Anthropology & African Studies at School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS, University of London) and has previous undertaken a foundation course in World Art History & Issues in Development Studies. Passionate by the diverse fields of the world Lisa received two Make A Difference Award in 2014 for her ‘great leadership and initiative’. She has also been organising annual commemoration event combining talks, film, live music, spoken words, storytelling and visual arts, inviting artists from Africa or African artists residing in Europe to perform. She was the president of the SOAS Photography Society and organised workshops, exhibitions as well as competitions for students. Lisa also works in Social Media as a Freelancer & teaches languages, French & Hausa to individuals and groups. OUR MISSION SHARING NARRATIVES As photographers from a huge continent the diversity of our narratives is immense. Africa makes us live within our experiences. Why isn’t it more exposed to the mainstream? FOSTERING SYNERGY Working in l togetherness is of high value, we are seeking concrete collaborations as humans & organisations because it is where lies the strength of serving a purpose. LONDON FESTIVAL The London African P. Festival is the major & biggest project AfroShoot will be building upon through the time. We see it happening in 5 years time. AFROSHOOT IN UK Defining the place AfroShoot can held in the UK is an important step that we will build over time, with you. We want to have a real impact and build relationships with you. ZOOM ON AFRICA Many of us are residing in Africa, we are thus dedicated to find missions to work with local organisations on the access to photography as a profession or artistic practice. DEAR PHOTOGRAPHERS We have a network of photographers from Africa & its diaspora around the world. From amateur photographers to professional or artistic photographers, we invite you to join our network for more exposure, more opportunities to be part of our events such as exhibitions or seminars. Additionally, we are currently curating & designing programmes of trainings and workshops for your own needs and interest.

AFROTAK

AFROTAK AFROTAK AFROTAK TV cyberNomads were founded in 2001 as cyberNomads, a politically independent initiative for political development in the fields of education, media, culture and ecology. We are based in Berlin but work nationally and internationally. We work for equal partnership in-between Africa and Europe, the emancipation of the African Diaspora Germany and the equality of women and men. Documenting, communicating and visualizing content of self determined initiatives for political education, media empowerment, liberation art and scientific African renaissance we aim at contributing to the architecture of an overall German-European culture that acknowledges its own power of defining the communication apparatus based on economic, political and cultural resources derived from a colonial past. Only the acknowledgment of an imperial, racist past and present can empower black and white Germany to step into a future that is deriving its strength from the spirit of Diversity and understanding of its people. AFROTAK TV cyberNomads is a platform for perspectives of Black Germans, Afro Europeans and African Diaspora Germany to complement the perspective of white experts and to correct it where necessary to draw a more realistic image of our world and contribute to an even ecological sustainable future

AFROTAK TV

AFROTAK TV AFROTAK TV Tasks and Objectives AFROTAK TV cyberNomads are committed to an equal partnership between Africa and Europe and to the emancipation of migrants and people of color, the African diaspora in Germany, as well as to equality between women and men. Through the promotion of educational, media, artistic and scientific exchange, AFROTAK TV cyberNomads also contribute to the sensitization of migrant topics in Germany. We are committed to building structures that challenge the European definition power through economic, political and cultural resources, and counteract the racist structures in favor of an equitable exchange . The focus of AFROTAK TV cyberNomads is the self-determined educational, media, artistic And scientific initiatives initiated by the Black Germans and Africans initiated debate with Africa in Germany - into the general mainstream. And thus the attention of the explicit prejudices, The structure analysis of the relations between Europe and Africa, but also the relations of the white German population and the black German population, as well as the people of color in general, is necessary for AFROTAK TV cyberNomads to effectively communicate cultures in the spirit of diversity and international understanding. Only those who know the imperial, colonial and racist past and present and contextualize can move forward into a future that is linked to the spirit of the equal rights partnership. AFROTAK TV cyberNomads offer the initiatives of the Black Germans, Afro-Europeans and Africans a platform for your perspective of Germany, Europe and Africa, which complement the prevailing perspectives of the white experts and replace where necessary to provide a more realistic picture of our existence in the world And thus to contribute in small steps to lead this world into a future which is also ecologically sustainable. AFROTAK TV cyberNomads was founded in 2001 as cyberNomads, a politically independent initiative for political development in the fields of education, media, culture and ecology. We are based in Berlin but work nationally and internationally. We work for equal partnership in Africa and Europe, the emancipation of the African Diaspora Germany and the equality of women and men. Documentary, communicating and visualizing content of self-awareness, art, culture and the arts , Political and cultural resources derived from a colonial past. Only the acknowledgment of an imperial, Racist past and present can empower black-and-white Germany to go into a future that is deriving its strength from the spirit of diversity and understanding of its people. AFROTAK TV cyberNomads is a platform for perspectives of Black Germans, AfroEuropeans and African Diaspora Germany to complement the perspective of the world. African Diaspora Germany Berlin Project Coordination - Culture Media Education Development Cooperation - Book Publications, Multimedia Productions and Political Lobbying - TV Channel and Social Network Africa Germany - AFROTAK TV cyberNomads - Black German Education Media Art & Culture Archive - Black Media Watch since 2001 AFROTAK TV cyberNomads have, since 2001, made educational policy work for a tolerant, diverse society in 3 core areas: 1 culture production / event management & conception 2 documentation, publication and distribution , social networking, online TV channel 3 Political commitment/ exercise of offices, participation in political decision-making bodies In 2010, we organized joint events at the CrossKultur Festival of the Integration Officers Berlin Tempelhof / Schöneberg as part of the exchange with the Turkish community 2010 Media Partner of the Action Plan of the Local Action Plan Berlin-Pankow within the framework of the Federal Program VIELFALT TUT GOOD! Youth for Diversity, Tolerance and Democracy in the Pankow District 2010 Participation Fees European Conference 2010 "Citizenship in the European Union" as experts for migrant citizenship 2010 Participation in the 3rd Bundesfachkongress Interkultur Bochum 2010 as media and cultural lecturer for Migrant Culture Strategies 2010 Participation in the Medienpanel-Talk of the Afrika Festival Steinhude 2010 as a media and cultural speaker 2010 Orientation of AFROTAK TV Media Lounge at Africa Art Exhibition Hamburg 2010 in cooperation with ARCA - Afrikanisches Bildungszentrum e. V. 2010 Participation in ECRI ( European Commission Against Racism and Intolerance) and the German Institute for Human Rights 2010 on the Germany Report 2010 Publication of the article "Negritude - Black global liberation movements of the 20th and 21st century" in the book "Racism in good German" Brandes und Apsel Verlag 2010 2010 Project management . Culture and Media - Coordination on behalf of the Berlin Brandenburg Migration Council to develop the NGO content and recommendations that were included in the regional action plan against racism and ethnic discrimination of the Berlin Senate 2010 Organization of the Black History Month Berlin in cooperation with African Union African Diaspora Committee Germany, Initiative Schwarze Menschen in Deutschland Berlin Funding by the Integration Commissioner of the Berlin Senate 2009 Participation in the Berlin Convention on Anti-Discrimination in the Federal Government 2009 on the Offensive for a Non-Discrimination Society 2009 Preparation and co-founding of the African Union Association African Diaspora 6th Region e. V. as the central organ of the African Diaspora Germany on the mandate of the African Union 2009 Organization of the Black History Month Berlin with Institute for Cultural Diplomacy Berlin and the Federal Center for Civic Education . Organization of Panels on "Identity of the African Diaspora in Germany" and "Perspectives of the African Diaspora in Germany" - Funding by Federal Center for Political Education In 2009, AFROTAK TV cyberNomads were invited by the House of World Cultures to initiate a discussion group of German cultural institutions on the integration of migrant women as an adviser and opening speaker 2005 Digital literacy training for refugees and asylum seekers, focus on young people in cooperation with Refugees Emacipation Potsdam. Conception and realization of the MAY AYIM Award - the first Pan-African Black German Literature Award under the auspices of UNESCO Germany. The invitation to tender was designed to deal with black German themes and was awarded a UNESCO project to commemorate the slavery trade and its abolition. Conception of the Black Germania as a symbol of the merging of African and German culture. Realization of the Skultpture by Stephen Lawson. Black Media Congress Berlin 2004 - From Berlin Africa Conference 1884 - Afrofuturism - in cooperation with the Federal Center for Civic Education, the House of World Cultures in Berlin . FOCUS WORLDWIDE / Location House of World Cultures Berlin Funding by Federal Center for Civic Education. Conception and operational project management for professional congresses for students, students, NGOs and multipliers from the media, education and art. 2004 Editor for the online dossier of the Federal Center for Political Education "African Diaspora in Germany" - funding by the Federal Center for Civic Education 2004 Editing and publication of the book "The Black Book - Black Eyelids" on the topic of African Presence in Germany from the Middle Ages to the Present in Cooperation with the Anti - Discrimination Agency Cologne - IKO Verlag 2003 Initiation Black Culture Network Germany Black Media Congress Berlin 2003 - Networking Europe - Best Practices between Grassroots and Mainstream. Content conception and operational project management of a congress for teachers, multipliers, students, students, NGOs, media, education and art. In cooperation with the Federal Center for Political Education and the Heinrich Boell Foundation Berlin . FOKUS EUROPE / Location Heinrich Boell Foundation Berlin Funded by Federal Center for Civic Education 2002 -2006 1. Digital inventory and documentation African presence in Germany. Online premiere of Africa in Germany Online Portal. Bundesweites hosting and editorial support of more than 50 initiatives and associations without their own web presence, eg Africa-Council Berlin, Brothers Keepers - ADERFA eV - AFRO-LOOK - AFRO TV - ANEE e. Association of the Guinnessens de Berlin - BLACK FLOWERS eV - Egbe Omo Onduduwa eV - Global Afrikan Congress - IAAH - ISD Berlin eV - Joliba - Mama Afrika eV - NIDO eV - Oromo Horn of Africa Center - PAF - Pan-African Forum - RACIBB e. V. - Refugees Emancipation eV - Sierra Leone Community eV - Sudanclub eV - Uganda Community Berlin - Umoja wa Tanzania eV Encyclopädica Afro Germanica - Structure of the Digital History Archives . Digitization of existing community archives, print publications, magazines, expansion of the video documentation of the African Diaspora in Germany, which began in 1987. Probably the most extensive existing archive on Africa in Germany. Black Media Congress Berlin 2002 - Soul Power and Cyberspace Content Conception and operational project management of a congress for teachers, multipliers, students, students, NGOs and media, education and art. In cooperation with the Federal Center for Civic Education and the Goethe Institute Berlin FOKUS GERMANY / Location Goethe Institut Berlin Funding by Federal Center for Civic Education. In 2002, we launched the Black Media Network , an overview of Schwarzer Medien's work in the fields of print, television, radio and online presences in various forms. We are celebrating the experiences of the Black German Media, And those of the African Diaspora Germany. It is an important concern for us to meet the mainstream for the exchange of experiences and the expansion of the educational horizon, as well as the creation of new forms of racism and discrimination-free education. Close cooperation with institutions such as the Federal Center for Civic Education has resulted 2001 Eventmanagement Bonn - content conception and operative project management of a congress for teachers, multipliers, students, students, NGOs and the media, education and art. - the inventory of educational products in the historical context. In cooperation with ADEFRA and the regional center for political education NRW funding by Federal Center for Political Education AFROTAK TV cyberNomads - OUR Project-History The Beginning The Diaspora experiences of the AFROTAK TV cybernomads team serve as a pool for a variety of contacts around Europe and around the Black Atlantic. In 2001 we started with an old 300 MHz Pentium computer, which was the first ideas for the project. Michael Kueppers-Adebisi's long-term passion for the documentation of the Afro-German experience as a diaspora in private archives, together with his original concept for a black. The concept for a digital culture pilot project dedicated to the integration of selfempowering migrant diaspora communities into the German mainstream what developed in close co-operation with Thorsten Schilling - the head of the multimedia department at BpB (Federal department for Political Education in Germany) in Summer 2001. In fall of 2001, the BpB has been involved in the development of a digital architecture for cyberNomads as a pilot community project for ISD Berlin eV (Initiative Black Germans and Blacks in Germany). January 2002 cyberNomads opened its office in the old Jewish quarter in the heart of Berlin Mitte at Hackischer Markt.A strategy plan for the development of the community For political education in NRW. In summer 2002 we have a major multimedia design company to supply the project with a professional content management system. The goal is to provide a platform uniting the various isolated and often fragmented Black German Diaspora communities of African descent around Germany. As a result we had the first major content management system used by a non-profit initiative in Germany. Due to our avant-garde concept the Bertelsmann Foundation in 2002 chose the project as one of the 15 best social business ideas from over 600 competition entries worldwide. We called the databank behind it, the "mother ship archives" the launched in autumn 2002 in Berlin. At the end of 2004 co-founder Abdulrahman Satti left the project to focus on his artistic development. Since 2005 we keep the project alive with our private funds and resources. Project History: Highlights & Milestones 2001 cyberNomad's conceptual position 2002 cyberNomads Internetportal Online premiere online database including CMS system Realization by Anymotion Düsseldorf Project Funding Federal Center for Political Education Bonn CyberNomads Participants Final Social Business In spring 2003 cyberNomads AFROTAK succesfully developed and realized the 1 st Afro German Multi Media Spoken Word Performance in Berlin's prestigious museum Martin Gropius Bau. CyberNomads Thus introducing spoken words by Black Germans and people of African descent to a major art institution. Afro German Spoken Word Artists enact their trans-cultural experiences. They are looking at each other in a different way, and they are looking at each other. The word turns into a nomad. It turns to music, dance, painting and installation in the search for a new transcultural identity. Afro German Roots are re (dis) covered in JazzOetry and Prenzlauer Berg Lyrics, Ragga and Concrete Poetry, Acid Jazz and New Hoerspiel and Dub Poetry and Haikus as the Afro German That lasts for about 1 ½ hours and takes you beyond the spiritual limitations of what is known as genre. Agna Sharifa Mami Watu, Amy Rebecca Evans, Olumide Popoola, Bullet Proof Soul featuring Curley Energies The AfroEnglish MultiMedia Spoken Word Performance can be booked through AFROTAK cyberNomads and is updated according to event, Afro German Spoken Word Performance Concept & Multimedia Direction by cyberNomads Performance in Martin Gropius Bau Berlin and Project Funding Federal Center for Political Education Bonn / Deutscher Kirchentag

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Agence d'Information d'Afrique Centrale

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Agrawal Association of Western Australia

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Aid Effectiveness Portal

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Aid for Africa

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Aidha

Aidha Aidha Since 2006, Aidha has impacted over 2,700 foreign domestic workers in Singapore. They are women who have had to leave their homes and families and travel abroad in search of employment opportunities that would hopefully create brighter futures for themselves and their families back home. We provide training programmes in financial literacy and self-development skills that we believe will enable a woman to have more opportunities and choice in the future. Our classes in money management, computer literacy, leadership and entrepreneurial skills have enabled many of our students to set up their own businesses and make productive investments in their home countries, providing more sustainable options for themselves, their families and their communities. The effects of our financial literacy programme education have also been felt by others in the Singapore community. Employers of our students have commented on the improved communication and money management skills and higher motivation levels of our students, resulting in better employer-employee relationships. Our classes are run by a pool of over 200 volunteers who generously share their time and talents. They are highly skilled and talented professionals from many different cultures and backgrounds but all united with the common aim of doing good and giving back. With the skills-based volunteering opportunities created at Aidha, they can use the experience they already have to make a direct impact in a woman’s life. It is a common comment from our volunteers that as much as they give, they are rewarded twicefold because they can actually see the impact they are making each week in their classes. Volunteers have also likened Aidha to a ‘training school for business skills’ because they gain valuable facilitation and presentation skills, learn more about managing people and intercultural communication, all of which are directly transferrable back in their workplace. We are able to deliver our programmes through the generous support of individual and corporate donors and foundations. Our work has been featured in various media publications including The Straits Times, The New Paper, InFocus (the publication produced by the Ministry of Manpower), ChannelNewsAsia and on Philippine TV. In this year’s Impact Journalism Day, which 40 major newspapers around the world participated in, Aidha was selected by The Straits Times and as one of the three organisations in Singapore that was making a difference in the world

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Akina Mama Wa Afrika (AMWA)

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Albany-Schenectady Estonian Society Albany-Schenectady Estonian Society Albany-Schenectady Estonian Society

Alberta Estonian Heritage Society (AEHS)

Alberta Estonian Heritage Society, AEHS Alberta Estonian Heritage Society (AEHS) We are * Descendants of up to six generations of Estonians who homesteaded in Alberta. * Estonian born Canadians who arrived here with our parents.* Estonians who for economic or political reasons have elected to call Canada home. * Assimilated individuals who appreciate the circumstances and efforts made by those who came before us. The Alberta Estonian Heritage Society (AEHS) was established in April 2005 to preserve and promote the cultural heritage of Alberta's Estonian community and to increase awareness of developments in Estonia. Not unlike other ethnic groups who sought land in the new world, the first Estonian pioneers organized societies in the early 1900's to assist one another with the challenges of establishing a new life in the harsh, remote and undeveloped farmland in the Canadian Prairies. The European conflicts that occurred later in the 1900's encouraged those fleeing persecution and loss of property to seek opportunities in the New World. Many Estonians came to Canada, and among those a number who settled in the province of Alberta. These new settlers found refuge in the societies originated by the early pioneers and in turn contributed to the continuation of those societies. The assimilation of Estonian born descendants into the general population eventually eroded the membership of these Estonian organizations to the point that only the Edmonton organization remained in operation. It was at this stage that the Edmonton Estonian Society and ex members of the other Alberta organizations came together to establish the AEHS. The unique aspect of the AEHS is the switch in emphasis from an Estonian society serving the needs of newer arrivals from Estonia, to an organization composed of descendants of Estonians united for the purpose of celebrating the commonality of their rich cultural heritage. Up to six generations of Albertans can look back to their Estonian pioneer roots.

Albuquerque Economic Development

Albuquerque Economic Development, australian diaspora, australia diaspora Albuquerque Economic Development AED staff will act as your advocate and point of contact providing confidential business assistance. We provide labor market analysis, operational cost comparisons, demographics, and identify incentives to help grow or expand your business. Contact us to start your free consultation. AED is a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to recruit business and industry, help local companies grow and generate quality job opportunities in the Albuquerque metro area. AED provides confidential assistance to businesses considering the area for expansion and new investment. Since its creation in 1960, AED has recruited more than 200 companies and 25,000 jobs to the Albuquerque metro area. We serve as an umbrella organization to promote investment in Bernalillo, Sandoval, Torrance and Valencia counties. With support from investors and allies in the public sector, AED actively recruits those companies that will export goods or services from New Mexico, thereby bringing new investment dollars to the state. By contributing to the area's economic growth, development and diversification, these economic base jobs improve the standard of living and opportunities within the Albuquerque area. In 2009, Site Selection Magazine recognized AED for its success in recruiting major projects to the community.

ALEFB MULTICULTURAL CENTER FOR CHILDREN

ALEFB MULTICULTURAL CENTER FOR CHILDREN ALEFB MULTICULTURAL CENTER FOR CHILDREN Teaching Arabic language and culture to children the playful way. Our Story Our Story Our Approach News and Events Get Involved Jobs and Internships FAQ Contact Us Alefb, multicultural center for children, was founded in Paris-France on July 16, 1996 by Michelle El-Khoury Tager, Dima Salam-Daouk, Marie de Bremond d'Ars and Suzanne Haddad. Our common concern as mothers and professionals was to preserve our unique cultural and language heritage. The way to achieve that was to transfer this to our children as well as to all children of Arabic descent living abroad.The teachers soon joined us and in particular, Rola El-Homsi, who is graduated from Lebanon as an early education specialist. Rola and Michelle put together one of the first curriculum, custom designed for teaching Arabic as a foreign language to children age 3 to 12 years old. Finally, on the first Saturday of October 1996, the first Alefb workshop was held with 30 children divided in 4 groups, at 32, rue de la source, Paris 75016. A fun place for kids to learn the Arabic language and culture was created. As of today, it has benefited more than 900 children. In France, Alefb is non-profit Association loi 1901. Our management is done on a total volunteering basis. As of 2013, the board of directors in France is composed of Joelle Toutounji-Wolff, Michèle Bou Abboud, Marie de Bremond d'Ars and Michelle El-Khoury Tager. Alefb, multicultural center for children, is also incorporated in the state of Virginia as a non-profit 501c 3 entity and is licensed to do business in the states of Maryland and California. As of 2007, the board of directors in the USA is composed of Vicky Berberi-Doumar, Nada Gaspard, Katherine Hopps-Telhami, Laura Raney and Michelle El-Khoury Tager. We strive to reach out to all the children regardless of their origin, disseminating one of the most advanced culture and a language used by more than 10% of the world population. Achievements Besides our regular workshop activity, Alefb has been involved in several projects such as: Designing and implementing a special workshop for the IMA (Institut du Monde Arabe) in Paris. Writing and publishing of a picture book on Lebanon called "Yasmine, Karim and Sam in the Enchanted book of Lebanon." The book was sold by SEAL, a New York based non-profit organization for Lebanon, for fundraising purposes. Initiating a pen-pal project between our student in WDC and children from SOS village in South Lebanon Organizing an art festival in Paris : Festival des artistes en herbe" where drawings from school children in Lebanon and Paris were exhibited, under the patronage of the Lebanese Ambassador to France and the Mayor of Paris 16eme. Organizing an event at the Lebanese Embassy in WDC under the patronage of Mrs Rim Abboud, wife of Lebanese Ambassador. Alefb was awarded a certificate of achievement for best services to the community from the Montgomery County Executive in Maryland. Designing an Arabic Interactive Storybook: "Dunia Fi Lubnan" Alefb is always looking into opportunities to serve its purpose. If you have an idea or a project, please do not hesitate to contact us. We will be delighted to help you fulfill your goal to educate children in the Arabic language and culture in a playful way. Testimonials from our educators and volunteers Rola El Homsi I am proud to have been associated with the creation of Alefb. I was and still am driven by my desire to create an identity for the Arab children born abroad. My background as an early education specialist, graduating from the Lebanese University, was of great help to me. When I see the children at Alefb so happy to learn about their origins and so proud to show their knowledge of the Arabic language, I am fulfilled. I have been teaching at Alefb since its inception in 1996! It is still as exciting and challenging and I really feel we make a difference in those children's life. Rafah Helal I work with Alefb as an educator and consultant. I have a bachelor degree in Special Education (Saint Joseph University -Lebanon) and a Master in Sciences of Education (Sorbonne University - Paris). The way we are teaching our kids is extremely captivating, through games, songs, plays and stories. They learn how to speak, read, and write Arabic as a second language. Not only we teach Arabic as a language but we also emphasize on our cultural values as we expose them to the customs and traditions of the region. Dominique (mother and volunteer with Alefb in Washington D.C.) I like volunteering for Alefb. I help the teacher and I get to know better how to speak Arabic since I left Lebanon 25 years ago. I also help create some educational arts and crafts. It is fun and I ask my children to help with it at home. That's how I keep them busy with Arabic during the week too! They did improve a lot and, so did I.

Alexandria University

Alexandria University Alexandria University Alexandria University

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Alfred P. Sloan Foundation The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation believes that a carefully reasoned and systematic understanding of the forces of nature and society, when applied inventively and wisely, can lead to a better world for all. The Foundation makes grants to support original research and broad-based education related to science, technology, and economic performance; and to improve the quality of American life. Though founded in 1934 by Alfred P. Sloan Jr., then-President and CEO of General Motors, the Foundation is an independent entity and has no formal relationship with the General Motors Corporation. The Foundation is unique in its focus on science, technology, and economic institutions. It believes the scholars and practitioners who work in these fields are chief drivers of the nation’s health and prosperity. In each grant program, the Foundation seeks proposals for original projects led by outstanding individuals or teams. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is interested in projects that it expects will result in a strong benefit to society, and for which funding from the private sector, the government, or other foundations is not widely available. Mission Statement Too often we fail to recognize and pay tribute to the creative spirit. It is that spirit that creates our jobs… There has to be this pioneer, the individual who has the courage, the ambition to overcome the obstacles that always develop when one tries to do something worthwhile, especially when it is new and different. (Alfred P. Sloan Jr., 1941) The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation makes grants primarily to support original research and broad-based education related to science, technology, economic performance and the quality of American life. The Foundation is unique in its focus on science, technology, and economic institutions—and the scholars and practitioners who work in these fields—as chief drivers of the nation’s health and prosperity. The Foundation has a deep-rooted belief that carefully reasoned systematic understanding of the forces of nature and society, when applied inventively and wisely, can lead to a better world for all. The Foundation’s endowment provides the financial resources to support its activities. The investment strategy for the endowment is to invest prudently in a diversified portfolio of assets with the goal of achieving superior returns. In each of our grants programs, we seek proposals for original projects led by outstanding individuals or teams. We are interested in projects that have a high expected return to society, and for which funding from the private sector, government or other foundations is not yet widely available. The major areas in which the Foundation is currently making new grants can be found on the Foundation’s Web site, along with information about how to apply for a grant.

Algeria British Business Council (ABBC)

Algeria British Business Council, ABBC Algeria British Business Council (ABBC) The Algeria British Business Council (ABBC): To promote a bilateral Britain-Algeria Business Council and enhance the ties between the two countries? business communities; thus increasing trade and investment between Algeria and the United Kingdom. To ensure direct exchange of information between the respective communities regarding general economic market developments. To promote agreements between Algerian and British businesses in terms of training, technological know-how, licensing, joint-ventures, as well as implementing practical initiatives aimed at strengthening bilateral economic relations. To study and present to their respective Governments proposals and measures designed to improve the development of economic co-operation between the two countries.

Algerian American Scientists Association (AASA)

Algerian American Scientists Association, AASA Algerian American Scientists Association (AASA) The Algerian American Scientists Association (AASA) is an independent, non-profit and non-political organization established in December 2007 in New York, NY. AASA?s vision is to build a network of Algerian-American Scientists and health care specialists in the U.S. in order to promote the advancement and growth of young professionals. This network will facilitate the flow of people (scientists and students), knowledge and technology; and help link academic institutions in the two countries. Moreover, AASA?s goal is to participate in health awareness and care in joint partnership with Algerian institutions. AASA?s axiom is to achieve its objectives with a series of concrete, measurable, realistic and result oriented actions in a timely manner. We appreciate the contributions of countless individuals who spent their valuable time and efforts in bringing AASA to where it is today. AASA's missions: 1. Promote and foster a network of Algerian students and professionals in science and health care in the U.S. 2. Enhance scientific exchanges, educational programs and networking by building bridges between research groups in Algeria and USA. 3. Participate in the advancement of health awareness and care in Algeria through cooperation between the United States of America and Algeria.

Algerian British Association

Algerian British Association Algerian British Association The mission of the Algerian British Association is to help the Algerian community get together to foster cultural links between the British community, to help support the Algerian community and promote Algerian arts, culture and traditions. Also develop cultural and educational activities to benefit the British Algerian community as a whole. Generally speaking, it aims to promote relations between Algeria and Great Britain and establish an interactive connection with the Algerian community living in the United Kingdom. The Algerian British Association believes that relations between our two countries are as important now as they have ever been. The events we organise throughout the year include: Raising awareness and knowledge of Algeria in the United Kingdom. Fostering commercial and economic links between the two countries. Promoting tourism and cultural exchanges. Encouraging greater social contact between the peoples of the two countries

Algerian International Diaspora Association

Algerian International Diaspora Association Algerian International Diaspora Association Algerian International Diaspora Association (AIDA) est ? but non lucratif et politiquement neutre. Elle a pour objectif de regrouper la diaspora Alg?rienne de par le monde afin de cr?er un r?seau efficace de solidarit? et la faire contribuer au d?veloppement de l'algerie Elle a pour vocation de promouvoir la communaut? et la f?d?rer autour d?actions fortes ? destination des alg?riens ou qu'ils soient . A. I. D. A. ambitionne de cr?er des synergies entre membres de la diaspora ?tablis dans le monde, sans aucune distinction. Ayant pour objectifs de former un r?seau solidaire et actif, d?expertises et de savoir faire a travers notamment cette plate forme electronique qui constituera un lien charni?re entre les membres de la communaut?.

Algerian Society In Scotland

Algerian Society In Scotland Algerian Society In Scotland Mission: The ASIS strives to be an effective and inclusive platform, a strong voice for Algerians in Scotland without discrimination against personal, political or religious views. It aims to keep its community informed about issues that are of concern to it, issues that affect our people, and issues that our members ought to know. The ASIS will promote and enhance effective integration leading to mutual benefits, dignity and respects for all. Vision: To serve the Algerian Nationals in Scotland, integrate positively, have equal access to available opportunities and make a positive contribution to the wider Scottish civil society as we move towards achieving our diverse potentials and aspirations. Aims and Objectives: To promote unity, progress and strength of our society and our host community, and to promote the general welfare of our members. To enhance and promote the right image of our community in Scotland and keep our members clearly and reliably informed about all the issues that are of interest to them. To organize and implement social, cultural and educational activities and meet the needs of our members. To represent the interests of our members at local and national levels. To work co-operatively with public and private agencies, businesses and community organizations through the exchange of ideas on issues of interest to our members.

Algerian-Americain Association of North America (AAA-NC)

Algerian-Americain Association of North America, AAA-NC Algerian-Americain Association of North America (AAA-NC) The Algerian American Association of Northern California (AAA-NC) is a cultural organization based in northern California. The AAA-NC is a non-profit, non-religious, apolitical. Created in 1992, AAA-NC collects donation to help with the operational expenses as well as to help Algerians in distress. The Algerian American Association of Northern California is not only a cultural gateway for Algerians and non-Algerians in the Bay Area, but it is also an organization which strives to help all Algerians in need. The AAA-NC is a cultural organization based in northern California. The AAA-NC is a non-profit, non-religious, apolitical. Created in 1992, AAA-NC collects donation to help with the operational expenses as well as to help Algerians in distress. The Algerian American Association of Northern California is not only a cultural gateway for Algerians and non-Algerians in the Bay Area, but it is also an organization which strives to help all Algerians in need. Through generous member donations, and community outreach pledge drives, the AAA-NC is a much needed helping hand for people in dire need.

Algerian-American Association of Greater Washington

Algerian-American Association of Greater Washington Algerian-American Association of Greater Washington About AAAGW: The Algerian-American Association of Greater Washington was created in 1992 as a social and cultural Association of Algerian-Americans and Algerians located in the Greater Washington Area of the United States of America. It is managed by an elected Board of Directors. Goals and Objectives: Foster, through educational programs and cultural activities, greater awareness, understanding and appreciation of the Algerian culture and ethnic heritage among Algerian-Americans, Algerians and persons of non-Algerian heritage. Represent and promote the common interests of Algerian-Americans, Algerians and non-Algerian members, and express, through all appropriate means, their shared concerns and views Facilitate the adaptation of Algerians in the United States while maintaining and fostering their unique heritage. Provide a community-wide forum and structure within which members may exchange views and formulate and implement coordinated programs and policies reflecting their common interests and shared concerns. Contribute to the strengthening of ties of friendship and cooperation between the United States of America and Algeria, and their people.

Algerie Network

Algerie Network Algerie Network Algerie Network

Aliyah Magazine

Aliyah Magazine, israeli diaspora Aliyah Magazine Aliyah Magazine is dedicated towards assisting friends from all religious and national streams to strengthen bonds with Israel and make Aliyah in terms of ‘raising our world’. This includes encouraging Jews to make a special Aliyah…a return to the Jewish Homeland. AM.1 has a long term program aimed at making the Jewish Aliyah process an achievable event, with the minimum of difficulty. Our family oriented theme highlights the exciting aspects of making the remarkable journey home. Emphasis is accordingly placed on the human side of making Aliyah. We are also about being part of a greater Aliyah Community, which is extended to both Jews and our many non-Jewish friends alike, each with a shared passion concerning the Jewish State of Israel. AM.1 has two main sections, both concerned with Aliyah: The first, is to provide entertaining media content for our Aliyah Community. This is better understood as the ‘magazine’ component of AM. It will include invites for personal on topic experiences, exciting competitions, deep insights, and much more! The second aspect concerns Aliyah Information itself. AM will be providing an Aliyah Planner tool, that helps make the Aliyah process that much easier to undertake. There will also be a growing data base of essential information, which will cover the main regions of Israel, making the Aliyah decision making process that much more meaningful. Aliyah Magazine is here for you, and greatly welcomes both your readership and active participation. he first Diaspora or dispersal of the Jewish people could reasonably be traced to the Biblical story of Joseph, sold into slavery through the hands of his brothers. This is in stark contrast to the Aliyah story of Abraham, their great grandfather. There then followed the great exodus from Egyptian captivity and another Aliyah into the promised land, by later descendants of Joseph and his brothers. That celebrated event was led by Moses the law giver. The Children of Israel resided in their land for many centuries before a series of devastating conquests led to yet other dispersals. The Jewish Diaspora as we know it today, stands as a sad reminder of previous days of glory. The Aliyah of the world, through the promised redemption, is said to usher in the end of this Jewish Diaspora. In its place, Jews will once again be reunited with their promised land in Israel. Indeed, recent years have proved that the dawning of this new golden age has already began as the Jewish State of Israel testifies to mankind.

All Black Radio

Allblackradio, All Black Radio, Black radio All Black Radio All Black Radio and Diaspora Radio Station are inspired by the legacy of the great west indian entrepreneur, organizer, and communicator, Marcus Garvey. All Black Radio is dedicated to building and maintaining the leadership position in Internet talk radio while providing quality programming worldwide through an ever-expanding distribution network. TOMORROW'S RADIO TODAY Streaming Internet Radio is quickly becoming the choice of media for many professional and amateur broadcasters. Since Internet radio is still in its early growth, many shows are put on the air that are simply unengaging and boring. All black radio is out to change all that and bring you the most innovative and entertaining radio programming on the Web. Always informative, occasionally uplifting, and often in-your-face political, but always entertaining, we are here to keep you coming back for more of what we call Edutainment. Allblackradio strives to bring you the best programming at the best quality streaming audio. All of our shows are broadcast and archived in PODCAST-quality audio, allowing you to enjoy the talk and the music wherever you happen to be.

All Cameroonian Cultural & Development Foundation

All Cameroonian Cultural & Development Foundation, Cameroonian diaspora All Cameroonian Cultural & Development Foundation The ACCDF Inc. is an IRS 501(c)(3) non-profit public foundation registered in the State of Maryland, USA. "The mission of the All Cameroonian Cultural & Development Foundation is to revive, conserve and enhance our cultural heritage. Our goal is to foster loyalty, equity, cooperation, unity and collective action in development amongst Cameroonians in North America and beyond. We will leverage our rich cultural diversity as a vehicle to stimulate collaboration and shared responsibility in building a progressive, enterprising and spiritually fulfilling Cameroonian community." Cultural education and appreciation influence economic growth and advance a rewarding intellectual, emotional, moral and spiritual life of a people. Community development is a collaborative and facilitativeprocess undertaken by the community that shares a common purposeofbuilding capacity. The All Cameroonian Cultural &Development Foundation (ACCDF) combines cultural sustenance and community development to promote understanding, social cohesion and peace among Cameroonians, collaboratively planned and led initiatives, and external partnerships to enhance resource development. ACCDF’S overriding objective is to maintain and improve positive professional, cultural, social and economic engagements in order to enhance the quality of life in the Cameroonian Diaspora and to assist in the transfer of brain gain to our motherland and Africa.

All For Reparations and Emancipation

All For Reparations and Emancipation, AFRE All For Reparations and Emancipation We, Afrodescendants (so-called African-Americans), have been identified by the majority population as Negroes, Coloreds, and African-Americans, among other names. We are unlike other people of African descent, living today in different parts of the world, whose ancestors were not subjected to slavery. They know their identity: they still have their mother tongue, culture, religion, and tribal kinship. We, Afrodescendants, do not. Other people of African descent can enjoy the protection and assistance of their national authorities, if they so choose. But we, Afrodescendants, cannot. We are rendered a stateless people by the deprivation of these most precious human rights - the right to our mother tongue, culture and religion. We have only the UN to look to in hopes of protection. The UN is the designer of human rights. Is not the UN the protector of us? We want restoration: Afrodescendants must be rejoined to the human families of the earth - families such as the Chinese, the Italians, and so on. We have been claimed by the countries in which we live and forced to live under them as 2nd class citizens. We know that we, Afrodescendants, are a unique nation of people unto ourselves. Our histories, our having been transported from Africa for the purpose of enslavement, our suffering the living lingering effects of plantation slavery - these things bond us together as a nation of people. All the wise scientists, and you, in your hearts, will bear witness that we, Afrodescendants, are an ancient people who descended from Abraham. We were scattered through slavery, as was prophesied in the Bible, Geneses 15:13. We were stripped of our original identity, mother tongue, culture and religion. Today, still, we are denied these precious human rights that other nations enjoy. What can be done about our loss except the payment of reparations? We have worked toward the goal of recognition and reparations for fifteen (15) years in the UN and international community. In the year 1997, the UN Sub-Commission gave the Working Group on Minorities a mandate to examine the lingering effects of plantation slavery upon us. The UN Working Group on Minorities soon recognized that we have begun rejoining onto ourselves and our original cultures through the process of Ethnogenesis, and they officially acknowledged our self-chosen identity – Afrodescendants. We call upon all bodies of the UN to recognize us. And we call upon all so-called African-Americans to do the right thing. Let us recognize ourselves: we are Afrodescendants, member of the human families - the peoples and nations of the earth. Our time is here, now.

All Nations University College

All Nations University College All Nations University College All Nations University College

ALL-AFRICAN PEOPLE'S REVOLUTIONARY PARTY

ALL-AFRICAN PEOPLE'S REVOLUTIONARY PARTY ALL-AFRICAN PEOPLE'S REVOLUTIONARY PARTY What is the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP)? The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP) is a permanent, independent, revolutionary, socialist, Pan-African Political Party based in Africa, the just homeland of African People all over the world. It is an integral part of the Pan-African and world socialist revolutionary movement. The AAPRP understands that “all people of African descent, whether they live in North or South America, the Caribbean, or in any other part of the world, are Africans and belong to the African Nation”. (Kwame Nkrumah, Class Struggle in Africa, page 4). The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party recognizes that African People born and living in over 113 countries are one People, with one identity, one history, one culture, one Nation and one destiny. We have one common enemy – capitalism, in its many forms and manifestations – imperialism, zionism, racism and neocolonialism. We suffer from disunity, disorganization and ideological confusion. And we all have only one scientific and correct solution, Pan-Africanism: the total liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism. //////////////////////// O que é o All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP)? O All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP) é o partido político permanente, independente, revolucionário, socialista e Pan-Africano sediado em África, a pátria genuína de todos os africanos espalhados pelo mundo. É uma parte integral do movimento revolucionário Pan-Africanista e socialista a nível mundial. O A-APRP compreende que “todas as pessoas de ascendência africana, quer vivam na América do Norte ou do Sul, nas ilhas do Caribe ou em qualquer outra parte do mundo, são africanas e pertencem à Nação Africana.” (Kwame Nkrumah, Class Struggle in Africa, página 4). O All-African People’s Revolutionary Party reconhece que os africanos nascidos e a viver mais de 113 países são um só povo, com uma identidade, uma história, uma cultura, uma nação e um destino comuns. Temos, também, um inimigo comum — o capitalismo, nas suas diferentes formas e manifestações — imperialismo, sionismo, racismo e neocolonialismo. Sofremos de desunião, desorganização e confusão ideológica. E temos uma única solução correcta e científica, o Pan-Africanismo: a total libertação e unificação de África sob o socialismo científico. ///////////////////////// ¿Que es el All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP)? All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP) es un Partido Político, permanente, independiente, revolucionario, socialista y Pan-Africano con base en África, el único hogar para los Africanos. Es una parte integral del movimiento Pan-Africano y socialista mundial. AAPRP entiende que "todo descendiente Africano/a, vivan en norte o sur América, el Caribe, o en cualquier parte del mundo, son Africanos/as y pertenecen a la Nación Africana." (Kwame Nkrumah, Class Struggle in Africa, página 4). All-African People’s Revolutionary Party reconoce que Africanos/as viven en 113 países diferentes pero son todos un mismo pueblo,con una misma identidad, historia, cultura, nación y destino. Tenemos un enemigo en común capitalismo, en diferentes formas y manifestaciones — imperialismo, sionismo, racismo y neo-colonialismo. Padecemos separatismo, desorganización y confusión ideológica. Y, solo tenemos una solución científica y correcta, Pan-Africanismo: la liberación y unificación total de África bajo socialismo científico.

AllAfrica.com

AllAfrica.com, AllAfrica AllAfrica.com AFRICA NEWS - the one-stop source for up-to-date information on all of Africa, with reports from Africa's leading newspapers, magazines and news agencies.

Alliance Benin (New York)

Alliance Benin, New York Alliance Benin (New York) 1995-1998): La naissance de l'Alliance Benin. En 1995, notre cher compatriote, M. Antoine Tessy, le premier president de l'Alliance Benin, assistee par d'autre compatriotes tels M. Joseph Azatassou et M. Felicien Agbossou euent l'idee de creer un moyen de rencontre informelle qui reunira les beninois immigres vivant et travaillant a New York, New Jersey et Connecticut. Le groupe dirige par le feu Tessy Antoine, ont eu des reunions, celebre toute sorte d'evenements y compris des anniversaires, des mariages,des graduations et ainsi de suite. (1998-2007): La formalisation de l'Alliance B?nin. Le groupe a elu un nouveau president, M. Benoit SOGNONVI en 1998. Sous la direction du president Benoit Sognonvi, Alliance Benin a ete constituee avec le departement d'Etat de New York. La nouvelle equipe a egalement ouvert un compte bancaire et une boite aux lettres pour l'Alliance. Chaque annee, la nouvelle equipe a organise et celebre deuxevenements: la fete du Nouvel An et la celebration de notre independance nationale. (2007 - 2011) La seconde geberation: L'Alliance a elu une nouvelle equipe en 2007, presidee par le Dr Antoine Atinkpahoun. L'equipe du president Atinkpahoun a honor? notre tradition en organisant chaque annee, les deux principaux ?v?nements que notre communaut? celebre. (2011 - Present) La renaissance de l'Alliance: Mon equipe est privilegie d'avoir la possibilite de poursuivre le reve de nos pionniers. Pour ce faire, je voudrais inviter les uns et les autres a vous impliquer davantage dans notre communaute. Visiter et utiliser frequemment notre site. A partir de maintenant, la plupart de nos communications se fera a travers ce site. Par consequent, je vous invite a prendre quelques minutes de votre temps pour vous familiariser avec votre site web. Utilisez la page contact pour communiquer avec nous. Nous ferons de notre mieux pour etre la pour vous.

alliance des Beninois de New York, Connecticut et New Jersey

alliance des Beninois de New York, Connecticut et New Jersey alliance des Beninois de New York, Connecticut et New Jersey alliance des Beninois de New York, Connecticut et New Jersey is

ALLIANCE FOR BRAIN GAIN AND INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT (ABIDE)

ALLIANCE FOR BRAIN GAIN AND INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT (ABIDE) ALLIANCE FOR BRAIN GAIN AND INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT (ABIDE) ABIDE is a pioneer indigenous non governmental non profit development organization established to facilitate brain gain for national capacity building through active engagement of knowledge Diaspora. Alliance for Brain Gain and Innovative Development was founded by Dr. Tewabech Bishaw, a prominent Ethiopian public health professional who, after working for 30 years in Ethiopia and over 15 years abroad, returned to Ethiopia determined to contribute to the country's sustainable development and the people's prosperity. Dr. Tewabech believes that the Ethiopian Knowledge Diaspora, Ethiopian professionals working and excelling in their fields and currently living outside of Ethiopia have tremendous potential in contributing positively to strengthening Ethiopia's human resources. With this in mind, she founded ABIDE in 2006 to champion the role that the Ethiopian Knowledge Diaspora can play in the country's development. She advocated and made tremendous contributions towards the creation of policy that considers the positive role that the Ethiopian Knowledge Diaspora could play, and has been working with institutions to systematize and facilitate the Diaspora's engagement in institutions of higher learning and other key organizations in Ethiopia. To this end, she calls on ALL Ethiopians in the Diaspora who believe that they have knowledge, experience, skills and networks that they can contribute towards Ethiopia's growth and her people's prosperity to connect and get in touch with ABIDE so that we can work together to show the win-win relationship that is possible between Ethiopian institutions and the Ethiopian Knowledge Diaspora. ABIDE was founded by a diverse group of concerned Ethiopian citizens that is inclusive of Ethiopian professionals and youth in the country, members of the Diaspora and friends of Ethiopia who live in and outside the country. ABIDE strives to maximize brain gain through developing and strengthening institutional mechanisms and processes needed to coordinate and facilitate strong links and partnerships between local institutions and the Diaspora. To meet its objectives, ABIDE is working in with all development forces in and outside the country and in partnership with all stakeholders. Please join the movement. Share our page. Get involved and let us know in what way you would like to be involved - as a volunteer in Ethiopia - as someone interested in returning to Ethiopia for a short or long period - as someone who would like to be a coordinator in one of our key regions - as someone from an Ethiopian institution of higher learning that would like to support our needs based approach for the most effective outcomes!

Alliance for Democracy in Africa (Gambia)

Alliance for Democracy in Africa, Gambia Alliance for Democracy in Africa (Gambia) Based in The Gambia, the Alliance for Democracy in Africa (ADA) is an independent nonprofit, nongovernmental, tax exempt 501(c)(3) membership organization that is dedicated to promoting democracy by encouraging Africans, particularly women and children, to internalize and practise democratic values in their societies. The organization was founded in May 2000 and opened a West Africa Regional Office in The Gambia in June 2001. Alliance for Democracy in Africa (ADA) is a tax exempt nonprofit organization working to encourage Africans, particularly children and youth, to study, internalize and practice the values of democracy in their societies. The organization is not an affiliate of any political party, nor will it affiliate with any political party in Africa, or any other country. In many African countries advocates of democracy lack both institutions for and experience with democratic practice. Alliance for Democracy in Africa will ally with a global network of volunteer experts to provide practical assistance to civic and political leaders advancing democratic values and practices. The organization will work with democrats in African countries to build civic organizations and promote citizen participation. The organization will work with advocates of democracy to end conflict and promote peaceful political change. Both historical and current perspectives in Africa have shown that the absence of democracy breeds conflict within societies and among nations. Therefore, democracy building programs in Africa are an investment in peace. The organization will not impose solutions nor will it advocate that one democratic system can be replicated in another country. Instead, the organization will share experiences and offer a range of options so that leaders can adapt practices and institutions that work best for their situation. Alliance for Democracy in Africa will also provide citizens and their elected representatives resource materials, consultations and training on the practical tools of democracy.

Alliance Française de Brisbane

Alliance Française de Brisbane Alliance Française de Brisbane Who Are We? Alliance Française de Brisbane is a not-for-profit association dedicated to the promotion of the French language and culture. And we're the best French school in Brisbane! Click HERE to find out why! Did You Know? The Alliance Française de Brisbane was founded in 1907, meaning we have been teaching French in Brisbane for over a century! It is part of a large international network (with over 800 other Alliance Française all over the world).

Alliance Francaise d'Adelaide

Alliance Francaise d'Adelaide Alliance Francaise d'Adelaide The Alliance Fran?aise d?Adelaide is an Australian not-for-profit association dedicated to the promotion of the French language and culture. It celebrated 100 years of operation in 2010. The Alliance Fran?aise offers a wide range of French classes for all ages (children, high school students and adults) and all levels. You?ll find all sorts of courses adapted to your needs, availability and objectives. Our classes are conducted by experienced and qualified native French teachers. The Alliance is also a vibrant cultural centre and organises each year major cultural events and activities such as the French Film Festival, the French Christmas Market, cine-clubs, concerts, book launches and special events. The Alliance is accredited by the Ethnic Schools Board of South Australia and by the SACE Board of South Australia, and is the official examination centre for the DELF, DALF and TCF exams (run by the French Ministry of Education).

Alliance Francaise de Canberra

Alliance Francaise de Canberra Alliance Francaise de Canberra What is Alliance Française? The Alliance Francaise de Canberra is a not-for-profit organisation and a registered charity. An International Cultural Network The international network of Alliances Françaises currently consists of 850 committees established in 138 countries. The quality of instruction adapted to different publics and the ability to welcome all nationalities enables the Alliances Françaises to support and develop the teaching of French throughout the world to more than 500 000 students every year. The Alliance Française was created in Paris in 1883 by intellectuals and scientists such as Louis Pasteur, Jules Verne or Ferdinand de Lesseps. In Canberra since 1943 The Canberra branch was formed in 1943 and became a teaching center in 1950. At the Alliance qualified native speakers trained in the latest teaching methods will teach you to communicate in practical, modern French. We offer group or private courses at all levels for adults, high school and university students and children. We can arrange a regular or an intensive course for you. Experience We offer French language tuition to adults, teenagers & children since 1950. Our team of experienced native speakers receive regular training and practice the latest techniques. Quality Our method of teaching emphasizes task-based learning with all instruction given in French with active student participation. It is based on realistic and interactive activities which will enable the students to effectively communicate in everyday situations. Community The Alliance Française de Canberra is a not-for-profit organisation promoting Franco-Australian relationships that has the support of the Embassy of France. This close cooperation & collaboration makes the Alliance Française the heart of the French- Australian community in Canberra. Our Language Centre The Alliance Française de Canberra organises French language tuition for adults, high school students, children at all levels of competence in French (in groups or on a one-to-one basis, at the Alliance, at your home or at your desk). Our Cultural Centre Our cultural events and activities include music, art exhibitions, open days and café style discussions on science, history, literature and the regions of France. Each year the Alliance Française French Film Festival showcases around forty new and classic French films to a growing Canberra audience. Open to all, the Alliance Françaises contributes to the French Arts in Canberra by teaming up with local Australian cultural organizations to promote artistic productions from France and Australia. Works from international artists are regularly displayed in our Gallery and our cultural program offers a wide range of activities and events such as concerts, exhibitions, Cafés scientifiques and Cafés historiques. Note that any membership from the Alliance Françaises in Australia give you the right to reductions on our events. Our Resource centre Over 8,000 items including books, magazines, newspapers, travel guides, comics, children books, CD and CD roms, videos and DVD’s. A Café Bar is opened daily on the premises & French Channel TV programme including TV5, Euronews, Eurosport, and many others are screened daily on a giant TV screen as from 9am.

Alliance Francaise de Melbourne (AFM)

Alliance Francaise de Melbourne, AFM Alliance Francaise de Melbourne (AFM) WHO ARE WE? Founded in 1890, the Alliance Française de Melbourne (AFM) is an Australian not-for-profit association dedicated to the promotion of the French language and culture. It is the largest language school for French in Victoria with more than 3,500 students per year. With our team of qualified native French-speaking teachers, we offer a large range of courses, including specialised courses, private tuition, workshops, immersion days, outings to museums or restaurants and more! Teachers use cutting-edge technology with interactive whiteboards (IWB) in many of our classrooms to enhance language-learning through dynamic multimedia integration. The AFM is the only accredited examination centre to conduct all the diplomas issued by the French Ministry of Education as DELF and DALF exams, along with the TCF, TCFQ, TEF and TEFAQ. Named in honour of the Alliance Française de Melbourne’s founder, the well-known Berthe Mouchette Competition created in 1894 is open to students of French from Grade 3 to Year 12 and attracts thousands of candidates each year who bring French poetry to life through recitals. Enjoying the patronage and support of the French Embassy in Canberra the AFM, as the only French cultural centre in Victoria, organises major cultural events each year, such as the French Film Festival in March and the French Christmas Market in December. A varied program of exhibitions from local or international artists is regularly presented in our art gallery in St Kilda, and concerts, conferences and film screenings punctuate the cultural calendar all year round. Our multimedia library includes thousands of French books, CDs and DVDs as well as a dedicated section for students with documents to enhance their French language learning. Admission is free and open to the general public and lending is open to current students and members of our association. MISSION & VISION STATEMENTS OUR MISSION The Alliance Française de Melbourne encourages and promotes active, open connections between people in Victoria and French language and culture. It provides the means by which people can learn the French language and become engaged in the many different aspects of French culture including art, books, poetry, film, history, gastronomy, contemporary affairs, thoughts and ideas. It provides the opportunity for friends of French language and culture to come together in an apolitical, non-religious and welcoming environment. OUR VISION The Alliance Française de Melbourne will be seen by people in Victoria as the premier institution for all things related to French language and culture. It will achieve this vision through: Reaching a broad base of people throughout Victoria, including beginner students of all ages and expatriate French nationals. It will continue to understand their interests and needs and then meet them through a wide range of affordable activities and services, accessible in a variety of locations Providing the highest quality of French language education from qualified, native French-speaking teachers Offering a high standard of teaching facilities and advanced teaching methods using current technologies and multi-media tools. Working in collaboration with other French organisations and with other cultural institutions as appropriate Providing a working environment, which attracts the highest quality management, teachers and staff who are intimately connected with French language and culture. The Alliance Française de Melbourne will ensure continued relevance in the changing world and will grow in terms of students, members and variety of activities.

Alliance Francaise de Perth

Alliance Francaise de Perth Alliance Francaise de Perth The Alliance Française is a cultural non-profit association founded in 1883 in Paris. This association distinguishes itself from other language schools through its blend of learning and cultural immersion. There are over 873 centres in 136 countries, which make the Alliance Française the largest French language teaching association in the world. Being part of an outstanding professional network, the Alliance Française is also an official examination centre for recognized qualifications. With the collaboration of the AF global network, free resources are available to enhance your learning experience by practicing at your own pace. Through “le Passeport pour le français”, your achievements will be recognised around the world in the AF network. For more information on the AF network, you can visit the Alliance Française Fondation website : Site Alliance Française Fondation Site Delegation Generale Alliance Française en Australie Alliance Française de Perth The Alliance Française de Perth was founded in 1911 as the first French language centre in Western Australia. Run by a locally elected committee, its aim is to foster bonds and a better understanding between France and Western Australia by spreading the knowledge of the French language and culture and by promoting linguistic and cultural exchanges. French Immersion The centre organises French Language Classes at all levels for adults and children and Cultural Events such as the yearly Alliance Française French Film Festival, conferences, exhibitions, quiz nights and concerts. It has partnerships with the most important cultural institutions in the city: PIAF, WASO, WA Opera, PICA etc. Resources Alliance Française de Perth also has a media Library with books, videos, DVDs and CDs which can be borrowed free of charge. Furthermore, we provide translation services and help organise French language exchanges.

Alliance Francaise de Rockhampton

Alliance Francaise de Rockhampton Alliance Francaise de Rockhampton Alliance Francaise de Rockhampton has been in existence since 2000. We are a dynamic and friendly club teaching French language and providing opportunities for members to sample French culture. We organise a conversation group, film nights, dinners and other events. Our French classes cater for beginners, intermediate and advanced students. The teachers at Alliance Francaise de Rockhampton are all qualified and professional language teachers. For more than a century an ever increasing number of students from all parts of the world have been going to the Alliance Française school in the heart of Paris. Similarly, a network of associations set up throughout the world, and with the benefit of the Alliance name behind them, is bringing the French language to the public of many different countries. This exceptional longevity and vitality of the Alliance Française springs in part from the close links which have been established with the authorities, the people and the sponsors in the host countries, as well as with the government of France. An “alliance” is the fruit of a two-way agreement and of mutual support both of which form the basis of its perennial nature. The Alliance Française owes its success to the consistently faithful nature of a foreign public which continues to be enamoured of the French language. Deriving its strength from a name which is recognised all over the world, it has been able to maintain a presence in 138 different countries and to work its magic within the framework of a network of more than a thousand local committees, each one of which has its own individual personality. Being one and many at the same time, the Alliance symbolises a French nation which is universal and constantly moving forward. Faithful to the values of its founders, the Alliance Française remains committed to the formula of an association. This has formed the basis of its originality since 1883. In every corner of the world it maintains privileged links with the local community and in this way is able to work towards a dialogue with each different culture. At the same time, it is firmly committed to modernisation and to the adoption of new modes of organisation. The updating of the tools of its trade, the integration of new technology and the constant reappraisal of its teaching methods are all part of this general policy. In all areas, the Alliance Française thus finds itself situated at the heart of a changing world, drawing upon French cultural resources as well as local ones, upon the traditional as well as the modern, but also drawing upon a long-established history as well a future whose boundaries are changing day by day.

Alliance Francaise de Sydney

Alliance Francaise de Sydney Alliance Francaise de Sydney The Alliance Française de Sydney, your French language and cultural centre. The Alliance Française de Sydney is an independent, not-for-profit language and cultural organisation promoting Franco-Australian exchange since 1899. With an ambitious mission to spread the French language and culture well beyond the borders of France, it is one of the 819 Alliances Françaises existing in 137 countries all over the world. Situated in the heart of Sydney in an attractive building designed by the famous architect Harry Seidler, the centre offers French courses, holds cultural events and includes a media centre and a French café, « le Grand Café ». In August 2012, the Alliance Française has also opened a new branch in Chatswood, offering the same courses as the CBD branch for North Sydneysiders. Since 1989, the Alliance Française de Sydney has organised the annual Alliance Française French Film Festival. This prestigious festival has become a very important event in Australia with an exponential increase in attendees every year. In 2014, attendees totalled 157,000 across Australia and 49,000 in Sydney. The origins: History dating back 150 years The Alliance Française is an independent, not-for-profit language and cultural organisation. It was founded in 1883 in Paris as a national association to promote the French language around the world under the guidance of Pierre Foncin and Ambassador Paul Cambon. The Paris Alliance was created the following year by a board of directors featuring famous figures such as Jules Verne (author), Louis Pasteur (chemist and biologist) and Ferdinand de Lesseps (diplomat). The first Alliance Française abroad was created in Barcelona that same year. An international phenomenon Today there are 819 Alliances Françaises in 137 countries, with approximately 460,000 students worldwide, from Argentina to Canada, from the furthest tip of Africa to northernmost Scandinavia and across Russia, Asia and Oceania. Even in France – from Paris to Nice – the Alliance Française offers international students the opportunity to discover the richness of the French culture whilst living right in the midst of it. Each Alliance Française is an independent association bound by a common purpose to the Fondation Alliance Française. Each is, however, part of a worldwide network and is recognised for its high quality programs as well as the strong bonds forged with its local cultural, educational and business communities in addition to the French Government. Today the Alliance Française has set the benchmark for teaching French as a foreign language. The Alliance’s recognition by the French Ministry for Education and European organisations such as ALTE (the Association of Language Testers in Europe) clearly demonstrates its leadership in this field. The Alliance Française courses and programs creatively bring together French language and culture in a very diverse student body, proving that a language truly lives only when shared. Alliance Française and the host country The Alliances do not play a French diplomatic role at an international level. However, they can provide information on how to contact the French embassy or consulate. In Australia, passionate supporters and volunteers have worked alongside one another since 1895 to establish a dynamic network of Alliances that symbolises the strength of the friendship between France and Australia.

Alliance Francaise de Toowoomba

Alliance Francaisede Toowoomba Alliance Francaise de Toowoomba We are in Toowoomba. The Alliance Fran?aise de Toowoomba is a not-for-profit organisation situated in the heart of the Darling Downs: it was formed in the 1960s by people in the community to promote French language and culture in our region. Over the years we have offered a host of social, cultural and educational activities - consider however that we form part of a larger network around the world of Alliances. The Alliance is managed by a group of volunteers

Alliance Francaise de Townsville

Alliance Francaise de Townsville Alliance Francaise de Townsville Alliance Française de Townsville The Alliance Française de Townsville is a 100% self-funded, non-profit educational and cultural organisation, managed by a committee elected from its members. It was founded in 1968, and quickly grew into an active cultural organisation under the presidency of Professor Ron Sussex. Like other Alliances we have links with schools and universities, including presenting prizes for students excelling in French. Our aims We are an organisation dedicated to the promotion of French language and culture in Townsville. We teach French, a language spoken by over 175 million people in 42 countries. We offer a cultural environment through our services and activities. We provide quality teaching and our teachers are all fluent speakers. The committee also organises a large range of activities including café conversation, pétanque, picnics, bike rides and participation in community events such as the School French Competition, presenting excellence awards at James Cook University, participating in the Cultural Fest at Strand Park and Open Day at James Cook University. Alliances Françaises d’Australie There is a network of 31 Alliances in all states of Australia, including in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Hobart, Adelaide, Perth and Darwin. There are approximately 1,400 Alliances Françaises in 138 countries. The first Alliance Française in Australia was established in Melbourne in 1890. The head office of the Fédération des Alliances Françaises d'Australie is based in Canberra. The Fédération of Alliances Françaises in Australia is administered by a Federal Committee. The Secretary of the Fédération is sent by the Alliance Française de Paris. He promotes continual contact and the circulation of information between the local committees, the French Embassy and the Alliance Française de Paris. For more information about the Alliance Française in Australia visit www.alliancefrancaise.com.au Alliances Françaises dans le monde The Alliance Française, founded in Paris in 1883, is a non-profit and non-discriminatory association with a network of schools and cultural centres around the world aiming at promoting the knowledge and practice of the French language and its rich culture and sharing it with local communities. It is the largest French teaching association in the world. The Alliance Française is an international network of independently run committees established in approximately 138 countries in the world with 31 branches in Australia. It offers courses in French, in France and in many parts of the world, to all sections of society to promote French culture and cultures of French-speaking countries and to encourage cultural diversity. For more information about the Alliance Française in the world visit La Fondation Alliance Française www.fondation-alliancefr.org

Alliance Francaise Gold Coast

Alliance Francaise Gold Coast Alliance Francaise Gold Coast Bienvenue For over a century, the Alliance Française has been seeing through an ambitious project : Spreading French language and culture well beyond the borders of France. Known the world over, the Alliance is present in 133 countries where it has adapted its recipe to 1,071 local committees, each with its very own personality devoted to more than 420,000 students, all of which makes the Alliance Française the largest French language teaching association in the world. Alliance Française established a local incorporated association on the Gold Coast-Tweed region on the 10th February 1999. Objectives of the Association The teaching of French language, the advancement of education in the French literature and culture for the people of the Gold Coast-Tweed region, to foster a better mutual understanding between Australia and France by developing linguistic and cultural exchanges and to provide an enduring centre of knowledge and expertise in the Gold Coast-Tweed Area dedicated to that function. The organisation of French and national cultural events (shows, recitals, exhibitions, conferences, etc.) and of recreational and promotional gatherings. The encouragement of language-based travel in France and French-speaking countries. The Association, in furtherance of those Objectives, but not otherwise, is: (a) To coordinate with the Fondation Alliance Française in Paris and any successor; (b) Not to operate for the profit or gain of its individual Members whether these gains would have been direct or indirect; (c) To have no political, religious or racial leanings or bias. Volunteer Committee Members The committee members of AFGC volunteer their time for the benefit of the association and under the rules of the constitution receive no remuneration.

Alliance Francaisee Cairns

Alliance Francaise Cairns Alliance Francaisee Cairns In Queensland, the largest branch is in Brisbane. However, the Alliance is also very active in Atherton, Townsville, Toowoomba, Rockhampton, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast. The Alliance Française de Cairns, inactive for a number of years, started offering French language tuition and activities in March 2009. Our aim is to share the love of our French heritage and culture with the locals and: • To provide a French language centre offering a wide range of classes, at all levels, with qualified French speaking teachers • To build up a mediatheque with French books and magazines, CD’s and DVD’s (presently not accessible) • To produce and promote cultural events such as French films screenings, exhibitions, concerts, talks all with a French flavour.

Alliance Guinea

Alliance Guinea Alliance Guinea About: Alliance Guinea was founded in the aftermath of the massacres of September 28, 2009 , a day when the military brutally cracked down on tens of thousands of unarmed pro-democracy protestors, killing at least 150 people, wounding over 1200, and viciously raping more than 100 women and girls. This alliance of Guineans and friends of Guinea was founded in honor of all those who made the ultimate sacrifice on that day and to promote what our sisters and brothers were fighting for: the right of all citizens to self-determination and fundamental human rights. Mission: To promote democracy, human rights, and unity in Guinea. Our Approach: A worldwide, nonpartisan forum for friends of Guinea of all nationalities and ethnicities to share information and promote powerful citizen action across networks. What we do: Advocate to governments, international organizations and agenda setters in support of democracy and human rights in Guinea. Serve as an objective resource to activists, journalists, human rights organizations, law clinics, international agencies and others investigating or promoting promoting democracy and human rights in Guinea. Conduct outreach and provide resources for groups wanting to raise awareness and promote activism in support of democracy and human rights in Guinea.

Alliance Magazine

Alliance Magazine Alliance Magazine Through analysis of, and updates about, philanthropy and social investment, Alliance allows those working in the space worldwide to share their stories and exchange ideas.? Alliance features original reportage as well as conference reports, book reviews, Op-Eds as well as one longer feature per issue that focuses on an issue important to philanthropy and social investment. It is published in London.

Alliance Of Gambian Associations In The Americas, Inc

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Alliance of Nigerian Organizations in Georgia (ANOG )

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ALLIANCE OF NIGERIAN ORGANIZATIONS IN GEORGIA-USA

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Alliance of Nigerians Organization of Georgia

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AMBASSADE DU BENIN A PARIS

AMBASSADE DU BENIN A PARIS, diaspora beninose, benin diaspora AMBASSADE DU BENIN A PARIS La mission de l’Ambassade peut se résumer en quatre mots : Représenter, Informer Négocier et Protéger. L’ambassade représente le Bénin dans les pays de sa juridiction. Elle facilite les relations entre ces Etats et le Bénin. Elle informe les différents acteurs sur l’environnement politique, économique et social du Bénin. En outre, sur instructions du Gouvernement du Bénin, elle négocie les traités et les accords bilatéraux. Enfin, l’Ambassade du Bénin à Paris protège ses ressortissants dans sa juridiction, en étroite collaboration avec les Consulats.L’Ambassade du Bénin à Paris a été ouverte après l’accession de la République du Bénin (ex-Dahomey) à l’indépendance, le 1er août 1960. Son Excellence Monsieur Emile Derlin Zinsou est le tout premier ambassadeur du Bénin en France. L’Ambassade à Paris représente le Bénin auprès des pays suivants : France Espagne Albanie Grèce Portugal Serbie Grande-Bretagne et Chypre Elle représente également le Bénin auprès des Organisations Internationales ci-après : OMT Organisation Mondiale du Tourisme (Madrid) OMI Organisation Maritime Internationale (Londres) OIC Organisation Internationale du Café (Londres) OCDE Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques (Paris) OAMCAF Organisation Africaine et Malgache du Café (Paris) OIE Organisation Mondiale de la Santé Animale (Paris) IIF Institut International du Froid (Paris) OIF Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (Paris)

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Ambassade du Benin au Danemark

Ambassade du Benin au Danemark Ambassade du Benin au Danemark Welcome-Bienvenue-Velkommen Since June 18th 2009, the address of the embassy has changed to: Skelvej 2, DK-2900 Hellerup.Telephone and Fax numbers remain the sames Reception following the presentation of her letter of credence to H.M. The Queen Marghrethe II of Denmark Throughout the world , Benin is recognized as a peaceful nation. It is known for its political stability and its economic governance system. Furthermore, since April 6th 2006 a new positive factor has emerged: that is the election of His Excellency Dr Boni YAYI as a new Head of State. The Government of President Boni YAYI opted for a governance change; that change implies the consolidation of democratic gains and the creation of a shared prosperity. In the process of implementing that option, the diplomatic map of Benin has been revisited leading to the appointment of the First Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of Benin to Denmark with jurisdiction over the other scandinavian countries, the baltic countries and the Republic of Iceland. In this web site, we put at your disposal all useful and necessary information for Benin awareness, for the need of users as well as for the implementation of the strategic options of Benin´s government.

Ambassade du Benin aux Emirats Arabe Unis

Ambassade du Benin aux Emirats Arabe Unis Ambassade du Benin aux Emirats Arabe Unis Bienvenue à l'Ambassade du Bénin Je vous souhaite à toutes et à tous, la chaleureuse bienvenue et comme on le dit dans la langue du pays ici aux Emirats Arabes Unis, Ahlan wa sahlan, ou encore dans la langue dendi de chez nous, "Nakayo" sur le site de l’Ambassade du Bénin à Abu Dhabi. Première fenêtre du Bénin dans le Golfe, Abu Dhabi a vu ouvrir l'Ambassade du Bénin aux Emirats Arabes Unis le 29 octobre 2000. L'ouverture intervient bien des années après l’établissement des relations diplomatiques entre ce pays et le Bénin, survenue le 05 janvier 1986, conformément à l’article 2 de la Convention de Vienne du 18 avril 1961 sur les relations diplomatiques. Depuis lors, le poste n’a cessé de grandir tout en étant la cheville ouvrière du redéploiement de la carte diplomatique du Bénin dans le Golfe. Le poste est en priorité au service de la communauté qui est pourtant de taille modeste mais dont la qualité est fort appréciable. C’est d’ailleurs pour elle et grâce à elle que ce site prend corps. L’idée de sa création est née il y a de cela deux (02) ans, mais il a fallu le génie des uns et l’effort des autres pour qu’elle se matérialise. La réalisation technique est l'œuvre d'un compatriote résidant aux Emirats Arabes Unis. Je voudrais donc saisir cette tribune pour remercier tous les membres de la communauté béninoise et tous les agents de l’Ambassade pour leur appréciable contribution. Ce site en lui-même informe sur l’Ambassade. Il oriente les compatriotes sur les prestations qui leur sont offertes et les démarches à suivre pour en bénéficier. Il présente en outre un survol sur le Bénin et les Emirats Arabes Unis ainsi qu’un tableau synoptique sur les relations entre les deux (2) pays. Enfin, il facilite aux usagers désireux de se rendre au Bénin, les formalités d’obtention du visa. Comme vous pouvez le Constater, le site est pour le moment en français. La traduction des données en anglais et en arabe sera progressive, pour répondre davantage aux attentes des usagers en majorité anglophone. L'Ambassade appréciera hautement la contribution de tous les béninois de l'intérieur comme de l'extérieur, à l'animation de ce site, pour mieux vendre notre pays dans le Golfe. Pour ceux qui désirent avoir des informations plus générales, je leur recommande de se rendre sur les sites suivants : www.gouv.bj www.village-béninois.com

Ambassade du Benin aux Etats Unis D'Amerique

Ambassade du Benin aux Etats Unis D'Amerique Ambassade du Benin aux Etats Unis D'Amerique Benin Country profile Area: 112,622 square kilometers Population: about 10.3 million Population density: 90 per square kilometer (cf. Germany: 229 per square kilometer) Official language: French Independence: 1960 Capital: Porto Novo Form of government: Republic under a multiparty democratic rule Average life expectancy: 61 years Illiteracy rate: 59.5% (population over the age of 15) Top 3 exports: raw cotton (70-80%), groundnuts, palm oil Number of cotton growers: 237,500 (status 2010) Number of “Cotton made in Africa” farmers: 20,016 (status 2010) Overview of Benin Nationality: Noun and adjective--Beninese (singular and plural). Population (2013): 10,323,474. Annual growth rate (2001 est.): 2.97%. Ethnic groups: African 99% (42 ethnic groups, most important being Fon, Adja, Yoruba, and Bariba), Europeans 5,500. Religions: Indigenous beliefs (voodoo) 50%, Christian 30%, Muslim 20%. Languages: French (official), Fon and Yoruba in the south; Nagot, Bariba and Dendi in the north. Education: Literacy—Total population 37.5%; men 52.2%, women 23.6%. Health: (2001 est.): Infant mortality rate is 89.68/1,000. Life expectancy is 49.94 yrs. Work force: The labor market is characterized by an increased reliance on informal employment, family helpers, and the use of apprentices. Training and job opportunities are not well matched. Geographic Location: Benin is situated in West Africa and is bounded to the east by Nigeria, to the north by Niger and Burkina Faso, and to the west by Togo. Benin stretches 700km (435 miles) from the Bight of Benin to the Niger River. The coastal strip is sandy with coconut palms. Terrain: Beyond the lagoons of Porto Novo, Nokoue, Ouidah and Grand Popo is a plateau rising gradually to the heights of the Atakora Mountains. From the highlands run two tributaries of the Niger, while southwards the Ouéc flows down to Nokoue lagoon. Mono River flows into the sea at Grand Popo and forms a frontier with Togo. Benin is once again making a name for itself as it embraces democracy with characteristic fervor and is catapulted onto the African stage as a model of reform. Benin is the birthplace of voodoo (voodoo museums of Ouidah). Voodoo ceremonies can be colorful events, involving feverish drumming and highly charged dancing by costumed fetish priests. The pirogue is the name of a traditional boat. An advantage of traveling Benin is its size: it has to offer a lot within relatively short distances. For this reason this country offers great possibilities for short tours or for combined tours, covering various countries. The South of Benin has several beautiful beaches and lagoons with pile villages. What characterizes this area besides its beautiful landscape, are its voodoo practices and the interesting, often gruesome history of glorious kingdoms, slavery and colonialism. The northern part of the country distinguishes itself by the combination of vast savannas, landscapes and hills with plenty of waterfalls. Of special interest is the area of Somba with its unique architecture and exceptional traditions and customs. In the Pendjari wildlife park, also in the North, many animals like elephants, lions, baboons, antelopes, buffaloes and many different types of birds can be observed. In short, Benin offers brilliant opportunities for nature and culture lovers.

Ambassade du Benin en Allemagne

Ambassade du Benin en Allemagne Ambassade du Benin en Allemagne LES SERVICES L’ambassade dispose de six (06) services, à savoir : le service des affaires politiques et juridiques le service des affaires économiques, commerciales et de la promotion des investissements le service des affaires culturelles et scientifiques et de la coopération multilatérale le service des affaires consulaires et des communautés le service des affaires administratives, financières et du matériel le service de la traduction, de l’interprétation, de la communication, de la coopération décentralisée et des relations publiques Tous ces services concourent à un fonctionnement harmonieux et régulier en vue de la mise en œuvre efficiente de l’action diplomatique. Le service des affaires politiques et juridiques Il veille en particulier à soutenir la bonne coopération entre autorités béninoises et allemandes. Ses missions comprennent : assurer les communications officielles avec le Ministère fédéral des Affaires étrangères rendre compte des positions de politique extérieure allemande au Département observer les développements de la politique intérieure allemande traiter des questions juridiques liées au droit international et au droit positif béninois renseigner et fournir des informations relatives aux traités internationaux conclus par le Bénin. Le service des affaires économiques, commerciales et de la promotion des investissements Cette section traite des questions de politique économique et financière. Elle veille à promouvoir les bonnes relations bénino-allemandes et les contacts gouvernementaux dans le domaine de la politique économique et commerciale du Bénin. Elle pourrait également se faire l’interprète des positions béninoises auprès des autorités et du monde des affaires allemands au sujet des relations entre le Bénin et la RFA. Elle promeut enfin les investissements des partenaires économiques étrangers du Bénin. La section renseigne sur : l’économie béninoise (données et informations économiques, système fiscal, filières économiques porteuses, procédures administrative et judiciaire en vue de la création d’entreprises, liens appropriés, etc.) l’économie allemande (données et informations économiques, liens et adresses utiles, etc.) les relations économiques bilatérales (échanges commerciaux et politiques bilatérales). Le service des affaires culturelles, scientifiques et de la coopération multilatérale Les tâches liées à cette section consistent : au plan culturel à la promotion des relations culturelles entre le Bénin, l’Allemagne et les autres pays de la juridiction au soutien ou à l‘organisation de manifestations visant à promouvoir l’image du Bénin au soutien à la mise en place de projets artistiques aux aides diverses aux artistes béninois en Allemagne à la représentation, aux relations publiques et informations à caractère culturel. dans le domaine scientifique à ce niveau, il importe d’informer du fonctionnement du système éducatif béninois (renseignements divers) et de faire mieux connaitre les possibilities d´études qu’offrent les universities béninoises ainsi que faire part de leurs besoins en bourses de formation aussi bien au profit des étudiants que des enseignants béninois. Coopération multilatérale La section par l’intermédiaire d’organismes internationaux tels que les agences spécialisées des Nations unies siégeant à Bonn ou à Hambourg (Allemagne), travaille au développement des relations dans le cadre du financement de projets au Bénin. Le service des affaires consulaires et des communautés Il est chargé de l’administration de la communauté béninoise installée en Allemagne, dans les autres pays de la juridiction ou simplement des Béninois qui sont de passage. L’ampleur des tâches de cette section ne peut être mieux appréhendée qu’à travers la diversité des prestations offertes aux usagers de l’ambassade. Ces tâches se rapportent à tout ce qui est relatif au droit de la personne : état civil, documents de voyage, nationalité, assistance aux prisonniers, visas, inscription ou enregistrement, cartes consulaires, etc. Le service des affaires administratives, financières et du matériel Il gère l’ensemble des moyens de fonctionnement de la mission diplomatique. A ce titre, il administre les personnels qui concourent au fonctionnement de la mission et notamment les personnels de recrutement local. Il gère les crédits accordés par le Département dans le cadre du budget annuel. Le service de la traduction, de l’interprétation, des relations publiques, de la communication et de la coopération décentralisée Cette section a pour attributions: L’entretien des relations avec la presse La promotion de l’image du Bénin dans l’opinion publique des pays de la juridiction S’agissant de la coopération décentralisée, la section travaille à la promotion des relations entre le Bénin et l’Allemagne à travers : L’échange d’expériences entre les collectivités béninoises et allemandes, les Länder et les régions dans le cadre de partenariats formels, de projets d’intérêt commun ou d’appuis ponctuels Le renforcement de l’engagement des fondations, associations et Ong allemandes actives au Bénin de même que la promotion de relations entre les fédérations sportives des deux pays Un accent significatif sur les partenariats interscolaires et universitaires

Ambassade du Benin en Belgique ( BENELUX) Belgique, Nederland, Luxembourg et le St. Siege

Ambassade du Benin en Belgique, BENELUX, Belgique, Nederland, Luxembourg et le St. Siege Ambassade du Benin en Belgique ( BENELUX) Belgique, Nederland, Luxembourg et le St. Siege Mission permanente auprès de l'Union Européenne, la Cour Internationale de Justice, la Cour Pénale Internationale, l'Organisation pour l'Interdiction des Armes Chimiques et l'Organisation Mondiale des Douanes. L’Ambassade du Bénin à Bruxelles est heureuse de vous accueillir sur son site web. Notre souci est de mettre à votre disposition des informations utiles pour une meilleure connaissance du Bénin à travers son histoire, sa géographie, ses institutions, son peuple chaleureux et son riche patrimoine culturel et touristique. Vous y découvrirez également des informations sur les conditions d’entrée et de séjour au Bénin, les opportunités d’investissements et d’affaires, l’état et l’évolution des relations de coopération avec les partenaires au développement, la vie de la communauté béninoise dans le Benelux, et bien sûr les activités et les services consulaires offerts par l’Ambassade.

Ambassade du Benin en France

Ambassade du Benin en France Ambassade du Benin en France LA MISSION La mission de l’Ambassade peut se résumer en quatre mots : Représenter, Informer Négocier et Protéger. L’ambassade représente le Bénin dans les pays de sa juridiction. Elle facilite les relations entre ces Etats et le Bénin. Elle informe les différents acteurs sur l’environnement politique, économique et social du Bénin. En outre, sur instructions du Gouvernement du Bénin, elle négocie les traités et les accords bilatéraux. Enfin, l’Ambassade du Bénin à Paris protège ses ressortissants dans sa juridiction, en étroite collaboration avec les Consulats.L’Ambassade du Bénin à Paris a été ouverte après l’accession de la République du Bénin (ex-Dahomey) à l’indépendance, le 1er août 1960. Son Excellence Monsieur Emile Derlin Zinsou est le tout premier ambassadeur du Bénin en France. L’Ambassade à Paris représente le Bénin auprès des pays suivants : France Espagne Albanie Grèce Portugal Serbie Grande-Bretagne et Chypre Elle représente également le Bénin auprès des Organisations Internationales ci-après : OMT Organisation Mondiale du Tourisme (Madrid) OMI Organisation Maritime Internationale (Londres) OIC Organisation Internationale du Café (Londres) OCDE Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques (Paris) OAMCAF Organisation Africaine et Malgache du Café (Paris) OIE Organisation Mondiale de la Santé Animale (Paris) IIF Institut International du Froid (Paris) OIF Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (Paris)

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Ambassade du Burkina Faso in Ethiopia

Ambassade du Burkina Faso in Ethiopia Ambassade du Burkina Faso in Ethiopia L’Ambassade du Burkina Faso en République Fédérale Démocratique d’Ethiopie, Représentation Permanente auprès de l’Union africaine, de la Commission Economique des Nations unies pour l’Afrique, ainsi que des organisations onusiennes basées à Nairobi (Kenya), couvre plus d’une quinzaine de pays de l’Afrique de l’Est et du Centre. La création du site web de l’Ambassade permet ainsi de promouvoir l’image du Burkina Faso et de valoriser sa place dans le concert des nations. A cet effet, il contribuera à la mise en œuvre du programme adopté par le Gouvernement de Transition suite à l'insurrection populaire des 30 et 31 octobre 2014. Par ailleurs, le site web est un lien entre les utilisateurs des services offerts et l’Ambassade. Il fournit l’essentiel des informations nécessaires pour bénéficier de ces services et permet aux hommes d’affaires, investisseurs et touristes intéressés par le Burkina Faso d’avoir accès aux informations mises à jour sur les opportunités qu’offre le « Pays des Hommes intègres ». Il reste entendu que les services de l’Ambassade sont disponibles pour fournir toute information complémentaire et, c’est à ce titre, que le site offre une possibilité d’envoi de courriels et de saisine directe. Je vous souhaite une bonne visite et espère que vous y trouverez votre compte.

Ambassade/Mission Permanente du Benin en Suisse

Ambassade, Mission Permanente du Benin en Suisse Ambassade/Mission Permanente du Benin en Suisse Mot de l'Ambassadeur Chers internautes, Il me plait, au nom de tout le personnel et en mon nom propre, de vous souhaiter la bienvenue sur le site internet de l’Ambassade /Mission Permanente du Bénin auprès de l’Office des Nations Unies et des autres Organisations Internationales basées à Genève et à Vienne. Les activités de l’Ambassade/Mission Permanente, ouverte en novembre 2000, concernent aussi bien la coopération bilatérale que multilatérale. Au plan bilatéral, l’Ambassade du Bénin à Genève a juridiction sur les six pays ci-après : la Suisse, l’Autriche, la Bulgarie, la Hongrie, la Croatie et la Slovénie et a pour missions la promotion et le renforcement des relations entre le Bénin et ces pays d’une part, ainsi que la protection et la défense des intérêts du Bénin et de ses ressortissants résidant dans ces pays d’autre part. Au plan multilatéral, la Mission Permanente du Bénin auprès de l’Office des Nations Unies et des autres Organisations internationales basées à Genève et à Vienne constitue l’instrument d’animation de la coopération multilatérale avec les organisations et institutions spécialisées du système des Nations Unies ainsi qu’avec les institutions du système commercial multilatéral, notamment l’Organisation Mondiale du Commerce (OMC). Le présent site a pour ambitions de faciliter les relations entre l’Ambassade/Mission Permanente du Bénin à Genève et ses usagers et de rendre visibles ses activités. Il se veut une fenêtre sur le Bénin, pays épris de paix et de justice, pionnier des conférences nationales en Afrique dont les filles et fils s’emploient chaque jour d’avantage à la consolidation des acquis démocratiques et à l’édification d’une nation émergente par la création de richesses aux fins d’une prospérité partagée. Plusieurs rubriques sont proposées sur ce site dont notamment celles concernant : les informations utiles sur l’Ambassade/Mission Permanente : localisation, heures d’ouverture, pays de juridiction, etc. les prestations consulaires offertes aux usagers ; les charmes touristiques du Bénin, berceau du Vaudou, pays imprégné d’une histoire et d’une culture multiséculaires. Cordialement

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Ambassades et consulats Benin au Canada

Ambassades et consulats Benin au Canada Ambassades et consulats Benin au Canada Permettez-moi de vous souhaiter la bienvenue sur le site internet de l’Ambassade du Bénin près le Canada. Ce portail virtuel se veut à votre service, avec toute la proximité possible. J’ai présenté mes lettres de créances au Gouverneur Général du Canada le Très Honorable David Johnston, à la Citadelle de Québec le 03 octobre 2013. Mon arrivée à la tête de cette Mission marque le début d’une ère nouvelle avec comme seule ambition, d’être à la hauteur des aspirations légitimes du Peuple et du Gouvernement béninois pour une coopération plus dynamique et plus diversifiée avec le Canada et toutes ses Provinces et territoires autonomes. Une des principales fonctions de l'Ambassade étant, avant tout, de répondre aux besoins des citoyens béninois ainsi que des amis et partenaires au développement du Bénin. Ce portail virtuel a donc été conçu pour répondre pleinement à leurs besoins. Il est à la fois une fenêtre et une source d'information sur le Bénin, ses immenses potentialités, ses sites touristiques des plus attrayants d'Afrique de l’Ouest, sa réserve de faune sauvage qu'on rencontre rarement ailleurs et la richesse de ses diversités culturelles. Notre pari est de vous donner une information réactualisée et fiable sur notre pays. Vous pourriez y trouver des éléments d’information sur le Bénin, à l’intention des Béninois, afin de les guider dans leurs démarches et de leur apporter une information générale sur la Mère Patrie, ainsi que des Canadiens et autres nationalités,- je pense en particulier aux hommes d’affaires, aux touristes et aux coopérants humanitaires de tous pays - qui recherchent des données de base sur le Bénin, mises à jour et facilement accessibles. En vous assurant à nouveau de notre entière disponibilité pour répondre à chacune et chacun d’entre vous, je vous souhaite une très bonne visite virtuelle. Bienvenue sur le portail du Bénin au Canada

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Ambassades et consulats Benin au Cuba Ambassades et consulats Benin au Cuba ADRESSE Calle 20 n° 19, entre 1ra y 3ra Avenidas Miramar, La Habana (La Havane) Cuba TÉLÉPHONE LOCAL: (07) 204.2179 INTERNATIONAL: +53.7.204.2179 FAX LOCAL: (07) 204.2334 INTERNATIONAL: +53.7.204.2334

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Ambassades et consulats Benin en Suisse Ambassades et consulats Benin en Suisse Ambassades et consulats Benin en Suisse is ...

Ambassades et consulats du bénin dans le monde

Ambassades et consulats du bénin dans le monde. benin embassy Ambassades et consulats du bénin dans le monde Côte d'ivoire Siège : Boulevard André LATRILLE Lot 244 Cocody Adresse postale : 09 BP 283 Abidjan 09 Téléphone : 00 225-22 41 44 13 / 00 225-22 41 44 14 Fax : 00 225-22 41 27 89 E-mail : embbenin@yebo.co.za Ethiopie Siège : Churchill Road Adresse postale : P.O. Box 1496 Addis Abeba ETHIOPIE Téléphone : 00 251 171 01 87 Fax : 00 251 172 87 31 E-mail : ambaben_addis@yahoo.fr Libye Siège : 254, Rue Oumawen cité El Analous Adresse postale : BP 6676 Tripoli Téléphone : 00 218 21 483 7663 (Chancellerie) ; 00 218 21 483 6845 Fax : 00 218 21 48 38 602 E-mail : chabilafia@hot-shot.comTülex : 20357 Maroc Siège : 30, Avenue Mehdi Ben Barka Adresse postale : BP 5187 10105 Souissi Rabat Téléphone : 00212-3775 4158 ; 00212-3775 4160 00212-3775 2666 00212-3775 2644 (Res) Fax : 00 212-3775 4156 E-mail : benin@menara.ma Niger Adresse postale : BP 11544 Niamey Téléphone : 00227 722 860 ; 00 227 753 710 Fax : 00 227-772 860 ; 00 227-724 895 Nigeria Siège : 4, Abudu Smith Street Adresse postale : PO Box 5705 Téléphone : 00 234 1 614 411 Fax : 00 234 1 261 4385 AMERIQUE Canada 58 Avenue Glebe OTTAWA K1S 2C3 Téléphone : 001613 233 44 29 /48 68 Fax : 001613 233 89 52 E-mail : ambabenin@benin.ca Cuba Siège : Calle 20 N°119 entre 1RA y 3 Ra Avenidas -Miramar - HABANA Téléphone : 00 537-204 2179 Fax : 00 537-204 2334 E-mail : ambencub@céniai.inf.cu Etats Unies d'Amérique Siège : 2124 Kalorama Road, N. W Washington D.C. 200 008 Téléphone : 00 202 232 6665 ; 00 202 232 6657 Fax : 00 202 265 1996 E-mail:info@beninembassyus.org ; Site web : www.beninembassyus.org Organisation des Nations Unies (ONU) Siège : 4, East 73 Rd Street NEW YORK 0021 ; 125 East NEW YORK NY 10016 Téléphone : 00 212 249 6014 249 6025 Fax : 00 212 734 4735 ; 00 212 684 2058 ASIE Arabie Saoudite Adresse postale : P.O. Box 55285 Djèdah 21534 KSA Téléphone : 02 65 48 148 Fax : 02 65 82 824 Arabie Saoudite Adresse postale : P.O. Box 94013 Riyadh 11693 Téléphone : 00 966 1 2290193 229 1221 Fax : 00 966 1 229 0148 E-mail : ambeninry_ksa@yahoo.fr Chine Siège : 38, Rue'G U AN G HUA LU Beijing Téléphone : 00 8610 653 22 302 Fax :00 966 1 229 0148 E-mail:am.beninbj@yahoo.fr Emirats Arabes Unis Siège : Madina Zayed Rue N° 12 Secteur 34 Villa 21 Adresse postale : PO Box 3910 Abu Dhabi Téléphone : 00 971-2 /449 09 99/63 94 665 Fax : 00 971 -2 / 444 43 54 / 63 94 667 E-mail : beninemb@emrirates.net.ae Japon Siège : SOGO NAGATACHO building 2FN°31/11/28 NAGATACHO CHIYODA - KU Tokyo 100-0014 Japon Téléphone : 0081-3 3591 3461 Fax : 0081-3 3591 6565 E-mail : abenintyo@mist.ocn.ne.jp ; ambabenjp@yahoo.fr Koweït Siège : Al-Daiya Rue AL-lstiqlal Bloc 2 Maison N°8B Adresse Postale : P.O. Box 27277 Safat N°code postal 13137 State of Kuwait Téléphone : 00 965 254 5826 E-mail : ambeninkwt@hotmail.com Belgique Siège : Avenue de l'Observatoire, 1180 Bruxelles Téléphone : 00 322 374 9192 ; 00 322 374 0147 Fax : 00 322 375 8326 E-mail : ambassade.du.benin@skynet.be, Danemark Téléphone : 00 45 39 68 10 30 Fax: 00 45 39 68 10 32 E-mail : ambabenin@c.dk Fédération de Russie Siège : 7a, uspenki Pereoulok Téléphone : 00 7095-229 2960 ; 00 7095-229 6088 Fax : 00 7095-200 0226 E-mail : ambabeninmoscou@hotmail.com France Siège : 87, Avenue Victor Hugo 75116 Paris Téléphone : 00 33-(0)1 4500 9882; 00 33 01 4222 2319 Fax : 00 33 01 4501 8202 E-mail:ambassade.benin@gofornet.com ; République Fédérale d'Allemagne Siège : Englerallee 23, 14195 Berlin Téléphone : 0049 030 2363 1470 Fax : 0049 030 2363 14740 E-mail : ambabenin@t-online.de Suisse Siège : 36 rue de Lausanne - 1210 Genève Téléphone : 00 41 229 068 460 Fax : 00 41 229 068 461 E-mail : mission.benin@ties.itu.int ; info@missionbenin.ch UNESCO Siège : 7 Place de Fontenoy - 75007 PARIS Téléphone : 00 33 01 45 68 30 63 Fax : 00 33 01 43 06 15 55 E-mail : dl.permanente-benin@unesco.org Statut: Représentation diplomatique

Ambassador Dr. Erieka Bennett

Ambassador Dr. Erieka Bennett Ambassador Dr. Erieka Bennett African Diaspora in the USA and Ghana. Founder and Head of Mission of the (AU) Diaspora African Forum; Africanist, Diplomat, Published Author, Media Leader, Consultant, Advocate, Philanthropist, Businesswoman, Educational Facilitator, First African American Ambassador for the African Diaspora. To learn more, visit http://africandiasporaleaders.com/eriekabennett/

Ambrose Alli University

Ambrose Alli University Ambrose Alli University Ambrose Alli University

America’s Small Business Development Centers

America’s Small Business Development Centers America’s Small Business Development Centers America’s SBDC represents America’s nationwide network of Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) – the most comprehensive small business assistance network in the United States and its territories. The mission of America’s SBDC is to represent the interests of our members and their SBDCs, by promoting, informing, supporting and continuously improving America’s nationwide network of SBDCs. The mission of America’s nationwide network of SBDCs is to help new entrepreneurs realize the dream of business ownership, and to assist existing businesses to remain competitive in the complex marketplace of an ever-changing global economy. Hosted by leading universities, colleges and state economic development agencies, and funded in part by the United States Congress through a partnership with the U.S. Small Business Administration, nearly 1,000 service centers are available to provide no-cost business consulting and low-cost training. Small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs can go to their local SBDCs for FREE face-to-face business consulting and at-cost training, on topics including: Writing business plans Accessing capital Marketing Regulatory compliance Technology development International trade

American Anthropological Association (ABA)

American Anthropological Association, ABA American Anthropological Association (ABA) The Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA) was founded in 1970. The Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA) brings together Black Anthropologists and other scholars who are concerned with the goals of the ABA and who support its activities. ABA seeks to ensure that people studied by anthropologists are not only objects of study but active makers and/or participants in their own history. In a larger sense, we intend to highlight situations of exploitation, oppression and discrimination. Further it is our objective to analyze and critique social science theories that misrepresent the reality of exploited groups while at the same time construct more adequate theories to interpret the dynamics of oppression. We will encourage anthropologists to involve the people being studied and the local scholars, whenever possible, in all stages of research and dissemination of findings. We are committed to encouraging the participation of students of anthropology, recruiting Black graduate students, enrolling Black graduate students to the ABA and mentoring students involved in ABA. Finally we will strive to establish firmer connections and scholarly exchange among Black anthropologists, especially African anthropologists.

American Association of Blacks in Energy

American Association of Blacks in Energy, AABE American Association of Blacks in Energy The purposes of AABE are the following: To serve as a resource for policy discussion of the economic, social and political impact of environmental and energy policies on African Americans and other minorities. To ensure involvement of African Americans in governmental energy policymaking by recommending capable sensitive and informed personnel to appropriate officials. To encourage both the public and private sectors to be responsive to the problems, goals and aspirations of African Americans in energy-related fields. To encourage African American students to pursue careers in energy-related fields and to provide scholarships and other financial aid for such students. AABE: Energy Knowledge for our Community, our People and our Tomorrow Our Mission The American Association of Blacks in Energy (AABE) is a national association of energy professionals founded and dedicated to ensure the input of African Americans and other minorities into the discussions and developments of energy policies regulations, R&D technologies, and environmental issues.

American Association of Teachers of German

American Association of Teachers of German American Association of Teachers of German 1 - Organizational Profile and History: With over 4,000 members, the American Association of Teachers of German is for teachers of German at all levels of instruction and all those interested in the teaching of German. Founded in 1926, AATG believes that bringing the language, literature, and cultures of the German speaking world to all Americans is a vital humanistic endeavor, which serves an essential national interest. With members in all 50 states and nearly 20 countries, the American Association of Teachers of German is the only individual membership organization in the United States dedicated to the teaching of the language, literature and culture of the German-speaking countries. The AATG has 60 local chapters which support a variety of local projects with activities focused on public relations, professional development, and teacher and student immersion. Members represent elementary, middle-junior high school, high school, college/university, community colleges, and heritage language school teachers. 44% percent of AATG?s members teach at the pre-collegiate level, 34% post-secondary, and 22% are currently not teaching. The AATG is governed by an Executive Council consisting of 10 members including a president, vice-president, treasurer, presiding officer of the chapter presidents? assembly, and six regional representatives. The teaching level of Executive Council members is balanced and alternates between post-secondary and pre-collegiate at each election. The Executive Council meets in November during the AATG Annual Meeting held in conjunction with the ACTFL Convention and World Languages Expo. The AATG employs seven staff members in offices located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey outside Philadelphia.2 - Mission: The American Association of Teachers of German strives to: Promote the highest quality of the teaching and research of the language, literatures, and cultures of the German-speaking world, and expand teaching and research at all levels and in all settings. Define and promote the highest standards for teachers and learners of the language, literatures, and cultures of the German-speaking world. Emphasize the importance and obligation of providing increased access to, and equity in, all German program offerings at all levels for all students, including those from multiracial, multicultural, and multiethnic backgrounds, and for students in diverse geographic settings. Foster relationships within the language teaching profession, the teaching profession in general, and the educational establishment at large. Communicate to policy makers and the public the rationale, substance, and value of learning German, as well as the conditions for effective language teaching and learning. Strengthen the structure of the Association and its communication with its members. Continue to improve the quality of present services and to develop programs for a diverse membership. The AATG was founded in 1926 by college and high school teachers in the New York city area. On December 18, 1926, the first meeting of the organizers took place at Columbia University. Major work on the constitution took place in 1927, and the publication of the first issue of the German Quarterly in January 1928. In that first issue, AATG president Camillo von Klenze from the College of the City of New York wrote: "?it becomes imperative for us teachers of German to use every legitimate means of improving the position of German in our schools, colleges, and universities. The first step ?is the formation of an organization embracing all teachers of German in every part of the country. Only by enthusiastic cooperation can we hope to accomplish anything tangible.? The AATG continues a strong tradition of supporting teachers of German from pre-kindergarten to graduate programs in American universities. AATG is a key partner to a number of organizations supporting the teaching and learning of German in the US. AATG is a member of the American Council on the Teachings of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), the Joint National Committee for Languages/National Council for Languages and International Study (JNCL/NCLIS), the Modern Language Association, the National Federation of Modern Foreign Language Teachers Association (NFMFLTA), the National Standards for Foreign Language Collaborative, and the Internationaler Deutschlehrerverband (IDV).

American Bar Association

American Bar Association American Bar Association The American Bar Association is one of the world’s largest voluntary professional organizations, with nearly 400,000 members and more than 3,500 entities. It is committed to doing what only a national association of attorneys can do: serving our members, improving the legal profession, eliminating bias and enhancing diversity, and advancing the rule of law throughout the United States and around the world. Founded in 1878, the ABA is committed to supporting the legal profession with practical resources for legal professionals while improving the administration of justice, accrediting law schools, establishing model ethical codes, and more. Membership is open to lawyers, law students, and others interested in the law and the legal profession. Our national headquarters are in Chicago, and we maintain a significant office in Washington D.C.

American Bar Associations | Bar Association Directory

American Bar Associations, Bar Association Directory American Bar Associations | Bar Association Directory BarAssociationDirectory.com is a new and innovative website that was constructed to provide clients with a centralized database containing an exhaustive list of bar associations. With so many bar associations in existence these days, many of them specialized or very localized, it seemed only logical that there be a website that pulled them all together in one, easy to find source. BarAssociationDirectory.com was designed to help clients find out about the bar associations in their area. American Bar Associations One of the major problems with having so many bar associations around the country is that there is not a centralized listing of each bar association in any given state. BarAssociationDirectory.com is here to fix that problem. This website has created a database containing information about every American bar association within a listed state. In addition to having this centralized list, BarAssociationDirectory.com also provides information about each of the listed bar associations. The information that is provided for each bar association in BarAssociationDirectory.com is designed to allow clients to read about a specific bar association and get a feel for the organization. This information often includes pieces about the bar association's stated mission, or how the bar association takes care of its attorney members. After all, there is a likely correlation between the effectiveness of a bar association and how well it carries out its mission goals. Lastly, BarAssociationDirectory.com can also be seen as a useful tool for those doing research about the legal scene in various states. Bar associations are often the holders of very informative local knowledge, and BarAssociationDirectory.com provides contact information for every bar association it covers. People can now contact any of the multitude of American bar associations simply by visiting one website, instead of tracking down each bar association individually. Many law firms looking to acquire lawyer leads eschew bar associations and use other forms of online client acquisition, for example matching services such as LegalMatch.com.

American Bible Society

American Bible Society American Bible Society The mission of American Bible Society is to make the Bible available to every person in a language and format each can understand and afford so all people may experience its life-changing message. We long for a world where no one is separated from a loving and restorative relationship with Jesus Christ. Our goal is to help 100 million people actively engage with the Bible and open 100 percent of languages to Bible engagement in the next 10 years. WHY? We long for a world where no one is separated from a loving and restorative relationship with Jesus Christ. WHAT? American Bible Society exists to help people meaningfully engage God’s Word so that they are transformed by Jesus Christ. HOW? We do this by collaborating with financial partners and key stakeholders to equip international partners and city Church movements with customized Scripture Engagement. CORE VALUES Four core values define the culture at American Bible Society: RESPECT “Love each other as brothers and sisters and honor others more than you do yourself.” Romans 12.10 (CEV) INTEGRITY “The Lord God has told us what is right and what he demands: ‘See that justice is done, let mercy be your first concern, and humbly obey your God.’ ” Micah 6.8 (CEV) UNITY “I want all of them to be one with each other, just as I am one with you and you are one with me.” John 17.21a (CEV) STEWARDSHIP “You, Lord God, are my mighty rock and my fortress. Lead me and guide me, so that your name will be honored.” Psalm 31.3 (CEV) “Anyone who can be trusted in little matters can also be trusted in important matters.” Luke 16.10a (CEV)

American Chamber of Commerce in Latvia

American Chamber of Commerce in Latvia American Chamber of Commerce in Latvia Founded in March 1993 by 27 American investors, AmCham is the leading foreign business organization in Latvia representing over 130 members that include some of the largest international companies in the country. When AmCham was established, the US Embassy was key in bringing the members together and pushing the idea towards fruition. It was the second Chamber founded in the former Soviet Union after the Ukraine?s chapter. AmCham is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental entity fully supported by its members. AmCham Latvia is affiliated to the US Chamber of Commerce and AmChams in Europe.

American Christian Society

American Christian Society American Christian Society Why American Christian Society: Freedom comes from God not government Healthcare for all citizens is the responsibility of all people in a society. Having fair and equal healthcare when needed is NOT a privilege but a RIGHT as a member of society. We are all in this together or we are not. The removal of laws that restrict peoples freedoms and make things unbalanced i.e. the patriot act, affirmative action… Putting our society above the race for more junk made in someone else’s society i.e.… “MADE IN CHINA” The rest of the world is passing us by as we continue our search for ultimate political correctness. Any land divided with so many different beliefs can never stand united. There needs to be a common accepted ground to stand on. At the same time allowing individuals freedom of religion but officially recognize this as a Christian land. We need the return of unity while having the freedom to pursue our own individual dreams and happiness. Every citizen has the right to bear arms unless convicted of a felony. Defending oneself and ones property is a God given right. An armed society is a polite society. No government should stop listening to the people. We currently are being ruled rather than governed. We want the immediate removal of the Federal Reserve. All people here illegally must be deported or jailed. There are many people waiting for Christ to come back and magically take them away to a “heaven” These same people do very little to nothing to change the world. They say “let the devil have it, me and my family are going to heaven". The world is ours; we are connected to it and created from it. It’s up to us what kind of place it is. God will give us gifts but it’s up to us to nurture these gifts. If you ask God for help he will unfailingly help and work with you. People who think God’s gifts are free spend much time in wishful thinking and selfish prayer hoping God will “work magic”.

American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA)

American Comparative Literature Association, ACLA American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) The American Comparative Literature Association, founded in 1960, is the principal learned society in the United States for scholars whose work involves several literatures and cultures as well as the premises of cross-cultural literary study itself.

American Coptic Union

American Coptic Union American Coptic Union American Coptic Union is a non-profit institution established informally on 1992, in Jersey City, and registered, on 1994. The Diarut, in Upper Egypt Massacre on 1992, where 12 Coptic Christian family slain by Islamic terrorism was the trigger behind the idea of establishing the ACU. The core values and principal of American Coptic Union includes the following: FREEDOM, HUMAN RIGHTS, And PEACE.

American Diaspora

American Diaspora American Diaspora Due to the serious nature of our situation in AmeriKa, I am not sure how much longer civilization will last in some functional form. I am a FIRM BELIEVER that we are in the early stages of an ‘END TIME’. This is NOT a religious belief. I consider it something different and have written about it on this page: http://www.helirods.net/verybadnews.htm I purchased a sailboat (pics coming) in Ventura, CA, in May of this year. So I am pretty much committed to FLEEING AMERIKA by sailboat into the Pacific Ocean! The reason for a sailboat is that it gives flexibility in destination. One can "island hop" for instance. Indeed, I am looking for others who may also be interested in FLEEING AMERIKA! It is my FIRM BELIEF that things will indeed go “GAGA” in the USA at some point in the not-to-distant future. My tentative plan is to sail from Southern Kalifornia to the Hawaiian islands then hang out in the neighborhood there and ASSESS THE SITUATION. If the situation on the continent is untenable, then perhaps I would set sail for the South Pacific and mill around there for a time, or maybe South America. I am open to any ideas pertaining to FLEEING AMERIKA! This website was hacked sometime during June, 2014, and the text on this front page was deleted. During the of Spring, 2014, this website WAS BLOCKED REPEATEDLY! These kinds of attacks should tell you something!

American Diaspora Platform

American Diaspora Platform, American Diaspora, diaspora in americajjjjnn American Diaspora Platform American Diaspora Platform: Helping America and the American Diaspora to Find and Engage with Each Other and with Opportunities Anywhere

American Egyptian Strategic Alliance (AESA)

American Egyptian Strategic Alliance, AESA American Egyptian Strategic Alliance (AESA) The American Egyptian Strategic Alliance (AESA) is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization comprised primarily of prominent and dedicated Americans of Egyptian heritage who share a common interest in promoting the strong ties between the U.S. and Egypt. The unifying goal of AESA is to encourage U.S. policy makers to promote and assist in building a secure and stable Egypt. AESA strives to assist decision makers in defining and shaping U.S. policies towards Egypt, and in furthering the creation and protection of a civil society based on the universal values of human dignity, democratic process, freedom of speech and individual rights. Mission: AESA seeks to empower American-Egyptians to serve the best interests of the United States with Egypt, a key player in the region; AESA facilitates decisions of stability and mutual prosperity which builds bridges to complement the best interests of both nations.

American Freedom Law Center

American Freedom Law Center American Freedom Law Center Having collaborated for over four years on many high-profile cases, in January 2012, attorneys David Yerushalmi and Robert J. Muise decided to formalize their working relationship by together launching the American Freedom Law Center (AFLC). Yerushalmi, an orthodox Jew, and Muise, an orthodox Catholic, describe AFLC as the Nation’s first truly authentic Judeo-Christian, public interest law firm. The American Freedom Law Center’s mission is to fight for faith and freedom through litigation, education, and public policy programs. The strength of our Nation lies in its commitment to a Judeo-Christian heritage and moral foundation and to an enduring faith and trust in God and His Providence. AFLC seeks a return to America’s founding commitment to receive God’s continued blessing to preserve the soul of this great Nation. AFLC is first and foremost a public interest litigation firm. It aggressively seeks to advance and defend our Nation’s Judeo-Christian heritage in courts all across our Nation. For good or ill, the battle for America’s soul is being waged in the courtrooms across America, pressed forward by secular progressives and sharia-advocating Muslim Brotherhood interests.

AMERICAN FRIENDS OF GEORGIA, INC.

AMERICAN FRIENDS OF GEORGIA, INC. AMERICAN FRIENDS OF GEORGIA, INC. Providing humanitarian assistance, education, medical care and rehabilitation for the most needy children and elderly in the country of Georgia since 1994.

American Friends of Kenya

American Friends of Kenya American Friends of Kenya About Us: American Friends of Kenya is a 501(c) 3 public charity based in Norwich, CT.Connecticut Founding Chapter, established in 2004. AFK grew out of the efforts of a group of Connecticut residents who visited Kenya during the summer of 2004 and returned determined to help the people of Kenya in their educational and health care concerns. Our original focus was the Thika District in the highlands region of the country, a hauntingly beautiful area dotted with small rural villages. Poverty is endemic, and people survive through subsistence farming. Electricity is generally unavailable, and only a small percent of children graduate from high school. People needing medical care usually walk two hours or more to a rural hospital that lacks basic medical equipment and supplies, including latex gloves. This was our original focus but has since expanded due to the generosity of many individuals contributing books, medical supplies, donations, time and even stuffed animals for the children in the hospitals!merican. Friends of Kenya is devoted to helping schools, hospitals, community libraries, women's shelters, orphanages and other institutions in Kenya. This is one international charity that has full accountability and oversight. Most importantly, it is one where nobody is paid a dime. We use no professional fundraisers and do everything through volunteer work. All money we raise goes to direct service, not salaries

AMERICAN HELLENIC EDUCATIONAL PROGRESSIVE ASSOCIATION

AMERICAN HELLENIC EDUCATIONAL PROGRESSIVE ASSOCIATION, AHEPA AMERICAN HELLENIC EDUCATIONAL PROGRESSIVE ASSOCIATION The mission of the AHEPA Family is to promote Hellenism, Education, Philanthropy, Civic Responsibility, and Family and Individual Excellence. Hellenism An important component of AHEPA's mission is to create an awareness of the principles of Hellenism to society. These principles include a commitment to humanity, freedom, and democracy. The preservation and promotion of these ideals is where AHEPA has, and always will be, deeply committed. AHEPA educates the community on these matters through symposia, forums, and conferences. Education AHEPA's commitment to education has been well documented throughout its history. Over $4 million is endowed at the local, district and national levels toward the use of scholarships and a half-million dollars is awarded annually. Thousands of young men and women have benefited as recipients of AHEPA scholarships at these various levels. The most famous recipient, perhaps, is ABC News' Host of This Week George Stephanopoulos. The scholarship program at the national level is administered by the AHEPA National Educational Foundation. It offers scholarships to a wide variety of students. Recipients are: traditional and non-traditional students; seminarians, including those entering Holy Cross Greek School of Theology; and high school seniors, college and post-graduate students who are looking to become tomorrow's leaders. The preservation of Hellenic or Classical Studies programs on college campuses is an important issue for the AHEPA Educational Foundation. A subcommittee of the Foundation, the Hellenic Cultural Commission, actively works to support the study of the Classics at universities. In addition, educational programs such as "Journey to Greece" and Washington Internships are sponsored by the Foundation. Philanthropy Philanthropy and volunteerism have been pillars of strength for AHEPA. From natural disaster relief to raising funds for the elimination of life-threatening diseases to making significant contributions to our local neighborhoods, AHEPA is at the forefront of charitable giving. AHEPA's philanthropic deeds are evident in the restoration of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island; in the Halls of St. Basil Academy, a childcare facility in Garrison, N.Y.; in the care packages we sent to our troops in cooperation with the USO; and in the building of healthcare facilities in Greece. Yet this only scratches the surface of the numerous philanthropic works of the association. In addition, countless charitable projects are undertaken every year by AHEPA's chapters and districts.

American Hellenic Institute

American Hellenic Institute, greek diaspora, diaspora or greece American Hellenic Institute Who We Are AHI’s members care deeply about the United States’ relationship with Greece and her neighbors. Following Pericles’s admonition that good citizenship requires involvement in public affairs, we recognize the important role played in a vibrant democracy by alert, engaged citizens. Our mission is as clear today as it was when AHI was founded in 1974: Upholding the rule of law in matters of U.S. foreign policy, particularly in our nation’s dealings with Greece, Cyprus, and Turkey. In 1974, when Turkey invaded and occupied Cyprus, AHI advocated a profoundly simple response—enforce U.S. law. At the time, the Executive Branch refused to enforce federal laws that prohibited Turkey’s aggressive use of U.S.-supplied arms and equipment. AHI persuaded Congress to take action. The resulting legislation—an unprecedented rule of law U.S. arms embargo against Turkey—proved that the democratic ideals of ancient Greece continue to thrive as long as ordinary citizens remain vigilant, informed, and active. Since then, AHI has become the leading forum for addressing important issues that affect the U.S.’s relationship with Greece, Cyprus, and Southeastern Europe. It is a well-respected lobby, think-tank, business network, and educational foundation that informs and influences leaders, policymakers and citizens alike. We invite you to join and help us fulfill our mission. What We Do From our Hellenic House headquarters, just steps from the White House, AHI’s professional staff works with legislators, the Department of State, the diplomatic corps, and educational institutions to advance the best interests of the U.S. on issues of importance to Greek Americans. Each year, AHI initiates congressional legislation, issues policy statements, and serves as an effective watchdog on issues affecting U.S. relations in Southeastern Europe. Key issues have included ending the illegal occupation of Cyprus, the treatment of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, aggression in the Aegean Sea, and the U.S.’s response to the dispute between Greece and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) over the latter nation’s name. While U.S. public policy is fundamentally important to AHI, so is the Greek American community. AHI is its public policy standard-bearer not just on Capitol Hill but in the nation-at-large. Each spring, AHI’s gala Hellenic Heritage Achievement and National Public Service Awards Dinner honors the best and brightest in the Greek American community and beyond for achievements in public service, business, education, science, and the arts. AHI’s conference on The Future of Hellenism in America, held each year at different locations around the country, is a traveling symposium on the evolving Greek American community. The AHI Business Network unites professionals for networking and educational exchanges.

American Hindu World Service (AHWS)

American Hindu World Service, AHWS, Hindu diaspora American Hindu World Service (AHWS) American Hindu World Service (AHWS) is dedicated towards the Interfaith activities and promotes secularism. AHWS promotes, educates and advocates on the Hindu-faith based perspectives of service of global health. The aims of AHWS is to not convert or impose (this is against Hindu faith), but to educate individuals about our community AND to spread service work around the globe, including in nations where there are non-Hindu populations. Find out how you can help.

American Hispanic Coalition

American Hispanic Coalition American Hispanic Coalition WELCOME TO AMERICAN HISPANIC COALITION A Coalition of Hispanic Groups of Conservative Ideals. Thank you for visiting our website. The American Hispanic Coalition is a non-partisan multi-lingual organization, which was founded with the purpose of raising awareness of the current events and challenges this great nation is facing while educating and uniting the community. We are a group of Americans of Hispanic descent and Americans who are determined to protect our Constitutional rights, Freedoms and the American Way of Life as it was conceived by the Founding Fathers and defended by those that came before us. We feel that the sacred principles of the Constitution are currently under attack and we intend to defend them. Please visit the coalition member websites below for more information. Who We Are: We are a coalition of Hispanic groups and individuals of Conservative ideals and faithful to the principles enshrined in the Constitution of the United States of America. Mission Statement: “To reach out to our Hispanic friends to create awareness of our shared American Values.” Vision Statement: “We are a group of concerned Americans of Hispanic heritage who want to reach out to other Hispanics and compatriots to create awareness of our shared conservative values. Always faithful to the principles enshrined in the Constitution of the United States, we will offer the necessary resources for defending our precious Freedom, seek to validate our shared principles of Liberty and actively unite in protecting those common values that made our Country great”.

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION, INDIAn diaspora AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION THE AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION IS DEDICATED TO CATALYZING SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGE IN INDIA AND BUILDING A LASTING BRIDGE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND INDIA. In a country where extreme contrasts of wealth and poverty coexist in everyday life, we hear hopeful stories of India’s rise and rapid growth. Yet 800 million people – more than the entire population of Africa – live on less than two dollars per day in India. Amid the tragic devastation caused by the Gujarat earthquake in 2001, President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister of India Atal Bihari Vajpayee recognized the need for a philanthropy platform that would connect the world’s two largest democracies and provide a trusted bridge for meaningful participation in India’s democratic and economic growth for both Americans and Indians. The American India Foundation has since built on this vision and created countless opportunities for India’s poor to live successful, productive lives while creating impactful change at an unprecedented scale, changing the lives of more than 2.3 million of India’s less fortunate “AIF plays an ever important role in bringing together Americans and Indians to become active contributors to India’s development. By supporting the AIF bridge, you are not only helping AIF remain a bastion of opportunity for the country’s poor, but also helping its democracy to thrive and flourish.” – President William J. Clinton From the very beginning, our founding members understood that the sheer magnitude of the task ahead would require the collective will, knowledge, and participation of all sectors in society. By engaging with a staggering range of stakeholders from young Americans and leading philanthropists to grassroots NGOs and government agencies, AIF has evolved to be more than a philanthropic organization over the last decade – it has become a social ecosystem designed upon principles of trust, transparency, and partnership, bringing people from all walks of life together in a movement to better whole communities and transform India into a more open, equitable, and vibrant democracy. In order to meet India’s long-term development challenges, we’ve realized the need to be responsive, open, and adaptable to rapidly changing needs on the ground and listen closely to the voices that often go unheard. AIF’s programs have an emphasis on inclusive models that focus on the unique needs of girls and women to achieve gender equity as a basis for sustainable change. Even though our solutions are intended to create large-scale change across the country, they begin and end with real people. A young girl forced to drop out of school and toil for eighteen hours a day, laying bricks in oppressive desert heat and walking for miles every day to fetch and carry water on her head for the family within a makeshift tent. An impoverished family migrating to a big city in search of opportunity. The husband and father of five children with no option but to take up a menial job as a transit operator, subject to exploitative conditions, bribery, and harassment. You can make a meaningful difference in the lives of individuals like these. We invite you to get involved, learn more about their stories and our approach to creating lasting impact for the less fortunate in India.

American Jewish Committee Archives

American Jewish Committee Archives American Jewish Committee Archives Filled with more than a million documents and hundreds of movies and radio shows, the New York-based American Jewish Committee Archives house an extraordinary range of resources on the past century of American Jewish history. This web site, launched as part of AJC’s centennial celebration in 2006, makes an ever-expanding portion of our physical archives instantly accessible. Interactive Timelines: A Decade-by-Decade Tour Through the Twentieth Century Decade-by-decade interactive timelines take you on an enlightening journey through American Jewish history. Start at the century timeline. Click on the decade of your choice. Look at the topics under discussion, click on the year you’d like to explore – and jump into history. Search Engine: Basic and Advanced Searches Take You Where You Want to Go The content of these digital archives, of course, goes well beyond the scope of the interactive timelines. Use the search engines, basic or advanced, to take you directly to archival material on a particular topic of interest. In Appreciation Our special thanks to George Blumenthal. His vision, generosity, and devotion to Jewish history were the catalyst for the creation of this invaluable resource. We also wish to recognize the artistic skill of Israeli photographer Ardon Bar Hama. His state-of-the-art photography powerfully enhanced this digital archival collection.

American Jewish Joint Distribution Center

American Jewish Joint Distribution Center, American Jewish, Jewish diaspora American Jewish Joint Distribution Center Who We Are The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is the world’s leading Jewish humanitarian assistance organization. Since 1914, JDC has exemplified that all Jews are responsible for one another and for improving the well-being of vulnerable people around the world. Today, JDC works in more than 70 countries and in Israel to alleviate hunger and hardship, rescue Jews in danger, create lasting connections to Jewish life, and provide immediate relief and long-term development support for victims of natural and man-made disasters. Who We Serve: The poorest Jews in the world, including isolated elderly, at-risk families, and vulnerable children Jewish communities around the globe building their future, wherever they may be Israel’s most disadvantaged citizens, including at-risk children and youth, the elderly, immigrants, and people with disabilities Victims of natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies JDC is the world’s leading Jewish humanitarian assistance organization, impacting millions of lives in more than 70 countries today. JDC leverages a century’s experience confronting poverty and crisis around the world to:

American Latvian Association (ALA)

American Latvian Association, ALA American Latvian Association (ALA) The American Latvian Association (ALA) is the main representative organization for the Latvian American community. Through 163 member organizations, churches, clubs and some 6,000 individual members we represent over 100,000 people of Latvian descent living in the United States. We are a non-profit, tax exempt educational and cultural organization registered as a private and voluntary organization with the U.S. Agency for International Development. ALA supports cultural activities and facilitates cooperation within the Latvian American community. We promote the study of Latvian language, history and culture. We ensure the availability of Latvian schools, books and teaching materials for our children. We assist newly arrived immigrants with information about the USA and we provide humanitarian aid to people in Latvia. ALA seeks to facilitate the peaceful and democratic development of Latvia by promoting understanding and support for Latvia through informational efforts in the USA.

American Lebanese Coalition

American Lebanese Coalition American Lebanese Coalition Leaders of the American Lebanese Coalition is ....

AMERICAN MOROCCAN COMPETENCIES NETWORK

AMERICAN MOROCCAN COMPETENCIES NETWORK AMERICAN MOROCCAN COMPETENCIES NETWORK To mobilize and catalyze the engagement of US-based Moroccan professionals, organizations, and academic institutions in the advancement of the socio-economic development of Morocco and the Moroccan community in the US.

American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute

American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute The American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute builds the capacity of emerging Muslim leaders from across the United States. AMCLI offers a national fellowship and regional training programs in select cities. AMCLI provides emerging leaders with recognition: meaning, enrichment, credentials; space to think differently, to be revived, to be challenged; tools: resources, capacity, training; inspiration through others and through faith; connection to other civic leaders within and outside of Muslim communities.

American Pakistan Foundation (APF)

American Pakistan Foundation, APF, Pakistan diaspora American Pakistan Foundation (APF) Mission The mission of the American Pakistan Foundation is to catalyze support for projects and initiatives that are important to the future of Pakistan and its relationship with the United States.​  Background Pakistan stands at profound crossroads today and is facing grave domestic and foreign policy challenges. On the domestic front, there is a significant shortfall of energy and major cities are experiencing massive blackouts, having a dire effect on economic productivity. Regarding education, 1 in 10 of the world’s children that do not go to primary school lives in Pakistan. Additionally, 66% of Pakistanis are under the age of 30 and according to the UN projections, Pakistan’s population will rise to 240 million in 2030. An estimated 36 million jobs will need to be created in the next ten years to absorb the youth bulge. The current scenario presents a grim outlook for the future. ​ We, at the American Pakistan Foundation, believe that it does not have to be this way. Providing the young people with opportunities can set Pakistan on a path of economic progress which will be beneficial not just for Pakistan but also for the global community. Our Inception The American Pakistan Foundation was formed in 2009 as the result of a meeting in New York City, at the invitation of the Foreign Minister of Pakistan, Shah Mahmood Qureshi. The meeting included representatives of the Pakistani American Diaspora, the private sector and public policy makers. The attendees of the May 2009 meeting concluded that the private sector had a vital role to play in the future direction of Pakistan and that promoting greater understanding and trust between the U.S. and Pakistan was imperative.  ​ APF was formally launched in December 2009 with an inaugural benefit in New York City featuring U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Dr. Moeen Qureshi and former Secretary of State General Colin Powell.

American Physical Society

American Physical Society American Physical Society Mission Statement: The American Physical Society strives to: 1 - Be the leading voice for physics and an authoritative source of physics information for the advancement of physics and the benefit of humanity; 2 - Provide effective programs in support of the physics community and the conduct of physics; 3 - Collaborate with national scientific societies for the advancement of science, science education and the science community; 4 - Cooperate with international physics societies to promote physics, to support physicists worldwide and to foster international collaboration; 5 - Promote an active, engaged and diverse membership, and support the activities of its units and members.

American Psychological Association

American Psychological Association American Psychological Association The American Psychological Association is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States, with more than 122,500 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students as its members. Our Work Our mission is to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives. We do this by: Encouraging the development and application of psychology in the broadest manner.Promoting research in psychology, the improvement of research methods and conditions and the application of research findings.Improving the qualifications and usefulness of psychologists by establishing high standards of ethics, conduct, education and achievement.Increasing and disseminating psychological knowledge through meetings, professional contacts, reports, papers, discussions and publications. Become an APA member Strategic Plan APA aspires to excel as a valuable, effective and influential organization advancing psychology as a science. The core values that guide our mission include pursuit of excellence, knowledge, diversity and ethical action. Our strategic plan goals are to maximize the association's organizational effectiveness, expand psychology's role in advancing health and increase recognition of psychology as a science.

American Refugee Committee

American Refugee Committee, ARC American Refugee Committee Our Mission ARC works with its partners and constituencies to provide opportunities and expertise to refugees, displaced people and host communities. We help people survive conflict and crisis and rebuild lives of dignity, health, security and self-sufficiency. ARC is committed to the delivery of programs that ensure measurable quality and lasting impact for the people we serve. Our Vision Every person who participates in an ARC program or project will have a better chance to take control of their life and achieve self sufficiency. Our Principles We strive to operate by the following guiding principles: Ethics: We hold ourselves to the highest standards of transparency, accountability and ethical behavior. Dignity: We preserve and enhance the dignity of the people we serve. Optimism: We provide hope for those in need to have a better life. Service: We use a participatory approach to enhance the delivery of our services that is appropriate and relevant to those we serve. Self-sufficiency: We enhance the self-sufficiency of the people we serve and empower them to rebuild productive lives. Advocacy: We advocate for the human needs of the people we serve and inspire the world community to respond to their needs. Stewardship: We are stewards of the human and financial resources we have been given to ensure they serve those with great need. Our Work Today, ARC works in 10 countries around the world helping victims of war and civil conflict rebuild their lives. ARC programs in Africa, Asia and the Middle Eastvprovide health care, clean water, shelter repair, legal aid, trauma counseling, microcredit, community development services, and repatriation assistance to 2.5 million people each year. ARC bases its relationship with uprooted peoples on mutual respect and a compassionate exchange of knowledge and values. ARC works with refugee and local communities to build programs that: Utilize the knowledge and experience of the people it serves Improve the lives of people in the community Train survivors and build the capacity of the community Sustain themselves years into the future

American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE)

American Research Center in Egypt, ARCE American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Founded in 1948, the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) is a private, nonprofit organization composed of educational and cultural institutions, professional scholars, and private individuals and whose membership is open to the public. ARCE's mission is to support research on all aspects of Egyptian history and culture, foster a broader knowledge about Egypt among the general public, and strengthen American-Egyptian cultural ties. Membership in ARCE helps the organization (and its chapters) carry out its tasks and provides an introduction to learning more about ancient, medieval and modern Egypt. ARCE provides a permanent archaeological and research base in Cairo for American scholars specializing in ancient, medieval, and modern Egyptian studies. The scope of programs and activities conducted or supported by ARCE includes an extensive program of research fellowships, archaeological excavations and surveys, and special historical and literary studies. Under its Egyptian Antiquities Project, funded by a grant from the United States Agency for International Development, ARCE supports a large program of conservation work and studies, including an archaeological field school. ARCE holds one conference per year in the United States. Check the ARCE website for the dates and location of the next conference. Membership in ARCE brings the satisfaction of being a part of the continuing discovery and conservation of Egypt. ARCE is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. All contributions to the organization are tax-deductible according to IRS guidelines. The American Research Center in Egypt?s national and local chapters are active in supporting scholarship, training, and conservation efforts in Egypt. Among ARCE?s many great achievements is the relationship with the Egyptian Ministry of State for Antiquities within the Egyptian Ministry of Culture, without whom our work would not be possible. ARCE is viewed as making important contributions that serve to help Egypt directly in its pursuit of cultural heritage preservation.

American Society of Missiology

American Society of Missiology, mission, christians, GOD, Jesus American Society of Missiology The American Society of Missiology is an inclusive and diverse professional association made up of members from Independent (Evangelical, Pentecostal, etc.), Conciliar, and Roman Catholic communions of the Christian church. This unique make up of our membership provides a dynamic and lively exchange of ideas, issues, and scholarship focused on the church's call to participate in God's mission to the world. We hope that as you explore this Web site and look at the lastest offer from Missiology, browse the offerings from our ASM Series, consider attending our Annual Meeting, and participate in one of our Forums, you will consider membership in the ASM and join in our dynamic exchange!

American Studies Association

American Studies Association American Studies Association The American Studies Association is the nation?s oldest and largest association devoted to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and history.? Read on to find out more what the ASA does.

American Togolese Community (AMETOCO)

American Togolese Community, AMETOCO American Togolese Community (AMETOCO) Is an US based nonprofit and non-political organization. AMETOCO was created in 2007 by a group of Togo citizens with the burning desire to fill in the existing gap, first between Togolese themselves leaving abroad and second between them and the motherland Togo. With the possibility of bringing together all Togolese living abroad especially those living in North America under one umbrella, in the pursuit of participating in the socio-economic and cultural development of Togo, the vision and mission statements of AMETOCO are spelled out as follows: VISION STATEMENT Drawing from the synergy of all the Togolese Diaspora, the vision of AMETOCO is that of strengthening the community as a dynamic organization, in a sustainable manner, by supporting its members, leading towards human development with dignity, equity and social justice. MISSION STATEMENT As a single voice and information-clearing house for those who share common history, common interests and common needs, the mission of AMETOCO is to promote the socio–economic well-being of the Togolese wherever they live in United States of America and at home while uplifting the image of our motherland Togo. MOTTO Awaken before it’s too late CORE VALUES The vision, mission and goals of AMETOCO are guided by the following core values: Leadership: To inspire by encouraging initiatives that exceed expectations Integrity: To build reputation by providing open and transparent communication that creates informed opinion and impartial judgment. Empowerment: To provide means and avenues for independent thinking and decision-making Advocacy: To provide situational interventions in what we be believe in Justice: To encourage fairness and equity GOALS The overall goal of AMETOCO is to promote the socio-economic and cultural development of the motherland Togo through the collective effort of the Togolese Diaspora living in United States of America. OBJECTIVES The objectives of AMETOCO are extensively developed in our strategic planning document, and are centered around the following concepts: Strategic networking and information Research and development Capacity building and empowerment Socio-economic and culture development

American Turkish Society

American Turkish Society, Turkish diaspora American Turkish Society The American Turkish Society’s mission is to enhance business, economic, and cultural ties between Turkey and the United States. The Society convenes leaders in government, business, and civil society to discuss and advance U.S.-Turkish relations; fosters understanding and cooperation between the two countries through education, cultural exchange, philanthropy, and networking; informs the American public about Turkey’s current affairs, economy, history, and society; presents and supports programs highlighting Turkish arts and culture; and nurtures the next generation of leaders through its Young Society Leaders program. Founded in 1949 by a group of visionaries, The American Turkish Society is the oldest American institution dedicated to building bridges between the United States and Turkey in order to achieve common goals of peace and prosperity. The American Turkish Society is a 501(c) 3 charitable organization, registered in New York State. Contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

American Universities

American Universities American Universities American Universities

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise, AICE American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise The American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE) was established in 1993 as a nonprofit and nonpartisan organization to strengthen the U.S.-Israel relationship by emphasizing the fundamentals of the alliance — the values our nations share. "There's a depth and richness of this relationship that is expressed every day.... we have an enduring bond of values, interests, beginning with security and the way that we share both information and other things to help the common defense of our common interests..." -Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu "The United States again reaffirms our unbreakable bond with our cherished ally, Israel. The partnership between our two countries built on our shared values has advanced the cause of human freedom, dignity and peace. These are the building blocks of democracy." - U.S. President Donald Trump AICE MISSION STATEMENT: To manage and expand the Jewish Virtual Library, the most comprehensive online resource on Jewish history, politics and culture, to provide a one-stop shop for users from around the world seeking answers to questions on subjects ranging from anti-Semtism to Zionism. To provide a vehicle for the research, study, discussion and exchange of views concerning nonmilitary cooperation (Shared Value Initiatives) between the peoples and governments of the United States and Israel. To publicize joint activities, and the benefits accruing to America and Israel from them. To explore issues of common historical interest to the peoples and governments of the United States and Israel. To provide educational materials on Jewish history, politics and culture. To educate the public about the dangers of the anti-Semitic boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) campaign. AICE PROJECTS: JEWISH VIRTUAL LIBRARY “The Jewish Virtual Library is the go-to source my students use for fact-based research pertaining to Judaism, Israel, and the Holocaust.” We hear this all the time from teachers. The Jewish Virtual Library (JVL) is the most comprehensive online encyclopedia of Jewish history, politics and culture. With nearly 25,000 entries, the JVL is a one-stop shop for students of all ages interested in anything from anti-Semitism to Zionism. The Library has a vast global audience, reaching more than 30 million visitors -- nearly 900,000 per month -- from more than 200 countries and territories over the last three years (2014-16). The Library has 13 wings: Anti-Semitism , Biography History Holocaust Israel Israel Education Myths & Facts Politics Religion Travel US & Israel Vital Stats Women. In addition, the JVL has a Bookstore, Glossary, Links, News, Publications, a Timeline of Jewish History, and the Virtual Israel Experience (VIE), an educational tool and virtual tour of Israel designed especially for students going on Birthright and other trips to Israel. The VIE highlights Israel's ancient history accentuated against its timeless beauty and modern culture. Much of the information in the Library cannot be found anywhere else in the world, such as material on joint U.S.-Israel projects, cooperation between Israel and the individual states and the treatment of Americans during the Holocaust. We received permission from the Library of Congress to put its Judaic and Hebraic treasures on our site. We have also received permission to use material from government and non-government sources around the world. We also publish primary documents from archives, including declassified materials from the United States and the United Kingdom. One of our goals is to offer visitors a single source for information so they don’t need to search thousands of other “Jewish” web sites. RESEARCH AICE highlights areas where Israel might contribute to the betterment of America and has published several studies to identify specific programs and approaches that can benefit Americans. These include: Breakthrough Dividend: Israeli Innovations In Biotechnology That Could Benefit Americans Building Bridges: Lessons For America From Novel Israeli Approaches To Promote Coexistence Experience Counts: Innovative Programs For The Elderly In Israel That Can Benefit Americans Good Medicine: Israeli Innovations In Health Care That Could Benefit Americans Learning Together: Israeli Innovations In Education That Could Benefit Americans Partners for Change: How U.S.-Israel Cooperation Can Benefit America PROVIDING FACTS ABOUT THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT AICE produces facts sheets and other reference materials to explain the history and contemporary issues related to the Arab-Israeli conflict. Our principal publication is Myths & Facts: A Guide to the Arab-Israeli Conflict. This has been an essential resource for students of the conflict for more than 50 years. FIGHTING THE DELEGITIMIZATION OF ISRAEL AICE is also engaged in producing materials to help the public understand that anti-Semitic boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) campaign. In addition to materials found in the Jewish Virtual Library, additional information can be found on the StopBDS.com site. /////////////// Welcome to the Jewish Virtual Library. The Jewish Virtual Library (JVL) is your source for information about Jewish history, Israel, U.S.-Israel relations, the Holocaust, anti-Semitism and Judaism. The JVL currently has more than 16,000 articles and 7,000 images and is accessed by users in more than 230 countries and territories worldwide. The JVL is not just an historical archive - it is also the place to find talking points and factual analysis on the most important news stories. When an issue comes to the fore and you need data fast, the JVL is the first place you should look. The JVL purposely avoids links with other sites so as to make this a one-stop shop for information. Our goal is to provide the basic information you need and we have purposely kept most of the entries brief to make them more digestible. Some will provide all the information you need, others should be viewed as a starting point. We stick to the facts and make as many primary source and original documents available as possible. The Jewish Virtual Library is a “living” library. It is constantly updating, changing and expanding. Users should not interpret the presence - or lack - of specific material as a reflection of any particular bias. Many entries are included because of their availability. Entries will be updated and added as new data is received. In addition, we add more articles, pictures, maps, charts and other materials on a daily basis. The process of archiving material relating to nearly 6,000 years of Jewish history has just begun. What you can't find today is likely to be here the next time you visit. As always, we encourage users to contact us with suggestions for new articles or corrections to current ones. Also, if you would like to work with us to prepare new materials, we welcome contributions. Thank you for visiting the Jewish Virtual Library, the source for facts about Jewish history and current affairs. Sincerely, MB Mitchell G. Bard, Ph.D. Executive Director American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE)

American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise, AICE American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE) The American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE) was established in 1993 as a nonprofit and nonpartisan organization to strengthen the U.S.-Israel relationship by emphasizing the fundamentals of the alliance — the values our nations share. "There's a depth and richness of this relationship that is expressed every day.... we have an enduring bond of values, interests, beginning with security and the way that we share both information and other things to help the common defense of our common interests..." -Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu "The American people and the Israeli people share a faith in the future, a belief that democracies can shape their own destiny and that opportunities should be available to all. Throughout its own extraordinary history, Israel has given life to that promise." - U.S. President Barack Obama AICE MISSION STATEMENT: To provide a vehicle for the research, study, discussion and exchange of views concerning nonmilitary cooperation (Shared Value Initiatives) between the peoples and governments of the United States and Israel. To facilitate the formation of partnerships between Israelis and Americans. To publicize joint activities, and the benefits accruing to America and Israel from them. To explore issues of common historical interest to the peoples and governments of the United States and Israel. To sponsor research, conferences and documentaries. To serve as a clearinghouse on joint U.S.-Israeli activities. To provide educational materials on Jewish history and culture. To promote scholarship in the field of Israel studies. AICE OBJECTIVES: FACILITATING PARTNERSHIPS AICE's major long-term objective is to bring innovative, successful social and education programs developed and proven in Israel to the United States to help address our domestic needs and provide tangible benefits to Americans. In 1996, AICE also began to look at specific opportunities for introducing novel American programs to Israel. For example, AICE introduced Hebrew University’s innovative YACHAD peer tutoring program to Guilford County (North Carolina) which initiated a pilot project in 1996 to adapt the program. “Reading Together,” as it is now called, improves the reading skills of second-graders and enhances the self-esteem of the fifth grade tutors. The program has been so successful that it is now being used in 207 different schools in 14 states.

An African City

An African City An African City CREATOR, WRITER, CO-DIRECTOR & EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Nicole Amarteifio is among several other highly acclaimed entrepreneurs cited in The Financial Times 2015 "Top 25 Africans to Watch" list, after a successful launch of the hit web series 'An African City.' The show hit 1 million views within the first several weeks of its release and, therefore, is considered one of Ghana's most successful YouTube channels. Nicole is currently pursuing TV projects full time, after a successful career in international development where she worked on policies such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) at The Whitaker Group. She is most known for her time as the first ever social media strategist for the Africa Region at The World Bank. Nicole holds a Bachelor of Arts in African Studies from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, and received a Master of Professional Studies in Corporate Communications/Public Relations from Georgetown University in Washington, DC. She was born and currently resides in Accra, Ghana. EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Millie Monyo is the Executive Producer of 'An African City.' As a New Yorker by birth with roots in Ghana, Millie's creative spirit drew her to Africa's first-ever web series; she believes in the cast and crew of 'An African City' and wants to see the show evolve from a web series into a full-blown TV show. She hopes this show will not only motivate African women throughout the continent and the Diaspora, but help to connect all women of all races, ethnicities and cultures from around the world. Millie graduated from the University of Maryland in College Park with a bachelor’s degree in Advertising & Mass Media and an emphasis on Business Management. Founder of MiMo Designs, the journey for Millie started as an intern at a Lizzie Grubman Public Relations in New York City where she rose through the ranks to become Senior Publicist of Entertainment and Fashion.

Anambra State Association

Anambra State Association, nigerian diaspora Anambra State Association WE, the sons and daughters and indigenes of Anambra State of Nigeria, living and/or working in various States and localities in the United States of America, being fully committed to the honest advocacy, pursuit, and actual practice and living of the life of love, peace, unity, togetherness, cooperation, understanding and justice among and between ourselves in all matters of common communal interest to us and to Anambra State and Nigeria, do hereby unanimously resolve to constitute ourselves into a formal Union and Organization for the purpose of pursuing and actualizing these goals and ideals for all Anambra people here in the United States and in Anambra State, Nigeria, and elsewhere, and to be governed and regulated by our CONSTITUTION. ARTICLE 1: NAME AND LEGAL STATUS The name of this Organization shall be ANAMBRA STATE ASSOCIATION, USA, Inc., otherwise called ASA,USA, or more simply referred to as The Union, or The Organization, or The Association. The Organization shall be a U.S.-based, non-profit civic, educational and charitable entity. ARTICLE 2: MOTTO The motto of the Association shall be: UNITY, PEACE, PROGRESS, and LOVE AND JUSTICE - See more at: http://www.anambrausa.org/about-us/#sthash.XgVjQeJx.dpuf

Ancestors unKnown

Ancestors unKnown Ancestors unKnown Ancestors unKnown provides educators with access to a unique curriculum that introduces students to untold histories and family history research. A nonprofit organization based in the United States, Ancestors unKnown serves participants in all parts of the world. Our mission To inspire the academic and personal success of young people by introducing them to their unknown ancestors. Vision In our ideal world, all young people are empowered to shape their own identities and achieve greatness, regardless of race, class, gender, religion, or otherwise. Such personal empowerment stems from knowledge of the past, personal connections to their ancestors, and pride in the histories that make them unique, yet simultaneously the same. A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots. – Marcus Garvey Background Our goal was to help young people learn something new about their ancestors, empowering them to do the research themselves. But what good is learning about your ancestors if you don’t understand what was happening in the world around them? So we developed a curriculum that combines history and genealogy research. The two concepts are inseparable, really. In 2013, Ancestors unKnown launched two pilot projects, in Suriname (South America) and Charleston, South Carolina (US).

Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Our mission is to help everyone discover, preserve and share their family history. Ancestry.com LLC is the world’s largest online resource for family history with more than 2 million paying subscribers across all its sites. Since starting as a publishing company in 1983, we have been a leader in the family history market for over 30 years and have helped pioneer the market for online family history research. We believe that most people have a fundamental desire to understand who they are and from where they came, and that anyone interested in discovering, preserving and sharing their family history is a potential user of Ancestry.com. We strive to make our service valuable to individuals ranging from the most committed family historians to those taking their first steps towards satisfying their curiosity about their family stories. The foundation of our service is an extensive and unique collection of billions of historical records that we have digitized, indexed and put online since 1996. We have developed efficient and proprietary systems for digitizing handwritten historical documents, and have established relationships with national, state and local government archives, historical societies, religious institutions and private collectors of historical content around the world. These digital records and documents, combined with our proprietary online search technologies and tools, enable our subscribers to research their family history, build their family trees and make meaningful discoveries about the lives of their ancestors. We have built the world’s largest online community of people interested in their family histories, and we believe that this network is highly valuable to our subscribers. Our community is a large and growing source of user-generated content uniquely focused on family history. Our registered users have created more than 70 million family trees containing more than 6 billion profiles. They have uploaded and attached to their trees over 300 million photographs, scanned documents and written stories. This growing pool of user-generated content adds color and context to the family histories assembled from the digitized historical documents found on Ancestry.com. Our subscribers also have attached to their trees over 3 billion records from our company-acquired content collection, a process that is helping further organize this collection by associating specific records with people in family trees. In addition, we are beginning to deploy tools and technologies to facilitate social networking and crowd sourcing, a means of leveraging collaborative efforts. These tools and technologies are intended to provide our subscribers with an expanding family history collaboration network in which insights and discoveries are shared by relatives, distant and close. Our service also provides a platform from which our subscribers can share their stories. Subscribers can invite family and friends to help build their family trees, add personal memories and upload photographs and stories of their own. We provide ongoing value to our subscribers by regularly adding new historical content, enhancing our websites with new tools and features and enabling greater collaboration among our users through the growth of our global community. Our plan to achieve long-term and sustainable growth is to increase our subscriber base in the United States and around the world by serving our loyal base of existing subscribers and by attracting new subscribers. Our revenues have increased from $225 million in 2009 to $620 million in 2014. The company is majority owned by Permira funds, along with certain minority co-investors.

Ancient Jewish Diaspora Archive

Ancient Jewish Diaspora Archive, Jewish Diaspora Ancient Jewish Diaspora Archive Welcome to the Ancient Jewish Diaspora Archive. This site is devoted to the study of the Jews in the Greco-Roman period (400 B.C.E. to c.500 C.E.) who lived outside of Judea. The purpose of this site is to provide an introduction to the primary source material available about Jews and Jewish communities in the ancient world with a focus on the relationships between Jews and 'pagans' in a world of ethnic diversity and the interrelationships between politics, society, culture and religion. The initial phase of the site (May 2007-May 2008) will explore two Jewish communities from opposite ends of the Greco-Roman world and with vastly different histories: the Jews of ancient Rome and the Jewish synagogue and community of Dura Europos. A proposal for subsequent phases is currently under construction. Purpose: The purpose of this site is to introduce students to the social, political and religious environment of Jews throughout the ancient diaspora by allowing them to navigate a vast range of primary source material and secondry data. Much of the material related to ancient Jewish communities throughout the Greco-Roman world is not currently available electronically. Our hope is that this site will begin to fill this gap. The goal of this site is primarily to allow students to critically analyze primary source material so that informed discussion of issues surrounding ancient Jewish communities outside of Judea and Galilee and an educated analysis of scholarly positions can be made. Highlights: Some of the highlights of this site are new translations of Greek and Latin material about the Jews in Rome, a glossary, an interactive map, timeline, and an extensive exploration of the Synagogue at Dura Europos with an ever expanding image gallery containing images and artifacts owned by Yale University Art Gallery from the excavation of Dura Europos.

Ancient Jewish History: The Diaspora

Ancient Jewish History, The Diaspora, jewish diaspora Ancient Jewish History: The Diaspora The Jewish state comes to an end in 70 AD, when the Romans begin to actively drive Jews from the home they had lived in for over a millennium. But the Jewish Diaspora ("diaspora" ="dispersion, scattering") had begun long before the Romans had even dreamed of Judaea. When the Assyrians conquered Israel in 722, the Hebrew inhabitants were scattered all over the Middle East; these early victims of the dispersion disappeared utterly from the pages of history. However, when Nebuchadnezzar deported the Judaeans in 597 and 586 BC, he allowed them to remain in a unified community in Babylon. Another group of Judaeans fled to Egypt, where they settled in the Nile delta. So from 597 onwards, there were three distinct groups of Hebrews: a group in Babylon and other parts of the Middle East, a group in Judaea, and another group in Egypt. Thus, 597 is considered the beginning date of the Jewish Diaspora. While Cyrus the Persian allowed the Judaeans to return to their homeland in 538 BC, most chose to remain in Babylon. A large number of Jews in Egypt became mercenaries in Upper Egypt on an island called the Elephantine. All of these Jews retained their religion, identity, and social customs; both under the Persians and the Greeks, they were allowed to run their lives under their own laws. Some converted to other religions; still others combined the Yahweh cult with local cults; but the majority clung to the Hebraic religion and its new-found core document, the Torah. In 63 BC, Judaea became a protectorate of Rome. Coming under the administration of a governor, Judaea was allowed a king; the governor's business was to regulate trade and maximize tax revenue. While the Jews despised the Greeks, the Romans were a nightmare. Governorships were bought at high prices; the governors would attempt to squeeze as much revenue as possible from their regions and pocket as much as they could. Even with a Jewish king, the Judaeans revolted in 70 AD, a desperate revolt that ended tragically. In 73 AD, the last of the revolutionaries were holed up in a mountain fort called Masada; the Romans had besieged the fort for two years, and the 1,000 men, women, and children inside were beginning to starve. In desperation, the Jewish revolutionaries killed themselves rather than surrender to the Romans. The Romans then destroyed Jerusalem, annexed Judaea as a Roman province, and systematically drove the Jews from Palestine. After 73 AD, Hebrew history would only be the history of the Diaspora as the Jews and their world view spread over Africa, Asia, and Europe.

ANCOP FOUNDATION USA, INC.

ANCOP FOUNDATION USA INC. ANCOP FOUNDATION USA, INC. In unity with the Catholic Church, consistent with the core values of Couples for Christ and recognizing Christ as the center of its work, ANCOP USA shares Christ’s love among the poor, uplifts their lives, restores their dignity as children of God, and transforms communities.

Angel Africa

Angel Africa Angel Africa Angel Africa is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to build the largest network of business and professional leaders dedicated to promoting economic growth in Africa by leveraging our collective talent to encourage entrepreneurship and private sector development and initiatives.

Anglo Indian Association of Western Australia

Anglo Indian Association of Western Australia Anglo Indian Association of Western Australia Anglo Indian Association of Western Australia

Angolan Communities Conference

Angolan Communities Conference Angolan Communities Conference Aims and Objectives: To give information and advice to members and non-members of the community in the best way to meet their needs. To promote and strengthen friendly and cordial relations between refugees and migrants. To provide assistance on problems that affect ours members such as: a) immigration, b) housing, c) education, d) social services and welfare: To assume interpreting and translation services for the benefit of members and others. To deal with emergency situations on a, b, c, d, above. To visit members in prison, detention centres, hospitals and other institutions. To share views and other life experiences. To liaise with other organisations concerning legal problems and social issues. To establish a programme that offers the opportunity to discuss matters arising within the community. To keep all members informed about the organisation's development and activities.

ANGOLAN INSTITUTE FOR ELECTORAL SYSTEM AND DEMOCRACY IASED

ANGOLAN INSTITUTE FOR ELECTORAL SYSTEM AND DEMOCRACY IASED ANGOLAN INSTITUTE FOR ELECTORAL SYSTEM AND DEMOCRACY IASED Since 2006, IASED has developed and implemented high impact projects designed to build local capacity to create and sustain peaceful democratic process including election in Angola. IASED approach focuses on opening space for dialogue and action between emergent civil society and government to engage in cooperative democratic process through decision-making process. For this purpose, IASED: (a) integrates media and community-based activities;( b) provides opportunities to turn conceptual knowledge into practical skills, and;( c) builds effective links between politics, civil. INDUSTRY: Human Rights/Democracy/Governance ACTIVITIES: Advocacy, Consulting/Training, Events, Technical Assistance/Capacity Development

Angolan Women for Leadership Association in UK (AWLAUK)

Angolan Women for Leadership Association in UK (AWLAUK) Angolan Women for Leadership Association in UK (AWLAUK) Angolan Women for Leadership Association in UK(AWLAUK) is a non-profit organization that is run almost entirely by volunteers. We engage in outdoor activities in the Coventy area where women share skill, experience, strenghts and ideas. We welcome women of diverse country, religions, ages, race and lifestyle. AWLAUK provides instruction by women for women. Activities are available for all skill levels to inspire the beginner and to challenge the more advanced.

Angolan Women's Association (UMARU)

Angolan Women's Association, UMARU Angolan Women's Association (UMARU) UMARU was initially formed to helping the integration of Angolan women into British Society. We also aim at helping in the promotion of Angolan women by elevating their education, cultural level and improving their general skills; promoting and strengthening the understanding of Angolan culture, heritage and solidarity amongst Angolan women and promoting awareness through discussion of issues affecting Angolan women and women worldwide. UMARU wants to be an adequate forum for exchanging experiences, discussing ideas, learning a little more about each other and sharing difficult and happy times. UMARU also wants to provide a perfect forum by keeping in touch with our country, sharing our hopes, and identities and bringing together different generations.

Anguilla Progressive Association of New York

Anguilla Progressive Association of New York, ANGUILLA DIASPORA ALLIANCE , ANGUILLA DIASPORA Anguilla Progressive Association of New York The Anguilla Progressive Association of New York (APANY) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation that was organized in 1996 by a group of concerned Anguillians and friends of Anguilla. The mission of APANY is to provide assistance for the educational, social, economic and cultural needs of Anguillians at home and abroad. APANY Inc. engages in various funding and fund raising activities to accomplish its goals of developing opportunities for all Anguillians. APANY’s primary fund raising event is its Annual Dinner and Awards Dance, when it celebrates Anguilla Day and presents awards. APANY has honored Anguillians in the New York metropolitan area as well as those living in Anguilla for their continued outstanding contributions to their respective communities or institutions. Awardees have freely given their time for the general welfare of Anguillians. APANY strives to carry on the philanthropic ideas of the previous organizations, such as The Anguilla Progressive Society of New York that was started here in New York in 1923; and the Sons and Daughters of Anguilla of New Jersey. Membership in the Association is open to any person who shares a common interest in promoting the goals and objectives of the Association. APANY also works with several organizations in Anguilla to accept contributions in North America. Goals and Objectives: To conduct activities which are charitable, educational, and cultural To unite all people who are interested in the island of Anguilla. To promote the goodwill and general welfare of its members To provide assistance to persons in need To provide activities for the elderly and youth To provide scholarship awards To provide mentors to assist and encourage students who receive scholarships To sponsor and support cultural and visual arts programs. THE ANGUILLA DIASPORA ALLIANCE " IN PROGRESS" Diasporas do matter and play an important role as an economic driver for both host countries and countries of origin. But the capacity of diasporas and migrants in general is very much ignored, causing damaging economic and social consequences across generations and for societies. Why do diasporas matter? Even though many people in diasporas have been separated from their origin countries for long periods, many are still connected through active participation in organized diaspora communities. Based on these continuing ties, policy makers, employers and business owners should regard diasporas as strategic elements for their businesses. Organized diasporas in communities function for the interest and best of their origin and host countries, but most importantly for the sake of their own wellbeing. Only they are equipped with unique intercultural and other knowledge and capabilities that can serve the needs of their home and host communities. How can APANY play an important role and connect with investors and social entrepreneurs? At APANY, we can mobilize relevant resources from both the public and private sectors, including government authorities, policymakers, multilateral agencies, private businesses, Anguillians living abroad, and a wide range of civil society organizations.All of these sources can contribute to development efforts on the island. An emphasis on building partnerships among the many stakeholders is a good practice for development generally, and diaspora engagement in particular. Diaspora Tourism Anguillian diaspora populations can play a unique and important role in boosting tourism in Anguilla as well as in supporting initiatives to produce goods associated with the cultures of the island. Tourists from the diaspora are more likely than other international travelers to have or make connections with the local economy. They may for example, opt to stay in small, locally owned accommodations (or with relatives) andalso eat in local restaurant or take a trip to the local grocery store around the corner. Diaspora Tourism and Generation Differences Government and tourism industry leaders should be attentive to the different tastes and interest among newer elements of diaspora tourism. Second-and third generation Anguillians living abroad may not have family living back home (their country of origin) but may certainly want to visit their ancestral roots. The key for growing this tourism sector is to promote and advertise suitable tourism campaigns directed at this specific group. At APANY we have partnered with a number of business leaders in the tourism sector and will take the lead in promoting evolving methods of attracting younger visitors as new socio-economic development project for Anguilla.

Anioma Association USA

Anioma Association USA Anioma Association USA Who are the Anioma people of Nigeria? This question assumes the lack of knowledge of those about whom it is asked. While the word "ANIOMA" is acronym, the people and place so called have existed for centuries. Interestingly, "Anioma" has been a community of people who, for ages inhabit the area between Ubulubu and Ebu in Aniocha North Local Government Area of the present Delta State. One needs to look at the colonial map of the area, and there sits "Anioma" wedged between Ubulubu and Ebu. The modern "Anioma" derives its name from the four geopolitical and cultural quadrants of Aniocha, Ndokwa, Ika and Oshimili. This coinage was made by no other than the founding father of "Anioma State Movement," the late Chief Dennis Osadebay of blessed memory. A people are defined by their culture, history and geography. More importantly, a people are defined by how they perceive themselves. In effect, a people are who they say they are. History notes that Anioma people comprise individuals of diverse origins, who over centuries and due to "culture contact" or cultural cross-pollination, have developed a unique culture quite distinct from those of their immediate surrounding neighbors. Located at the crossroads of very diverse influences, Anioma has developed a syncretic culture rich in varied contributions. Anioma people inhabit areas west of the lower Niger River, in today's constituted Delta State. From the perspectives of Nigeria's geopolitical matrix, Anioma is squarely within the south-south zone. In today's political dispensation, Anioma is designated as Delta North Senatorial District. To the east, Anioma is bounded by Anambra State; to the southeast by lmo and Rivers States; to the south by Bayelsa State; to the southwest by lsoko ethnic group; to the west, by Urhobo ethnic group; to the northwest by Edo State and the north by Kogi State. There are very few Nigerian communities that are so contiguous to so many immediate neighbors as Anioma. In spite of these contiguities to so many states and ethnic groups, Anioma people are united by cultural homogeneity and value consensus about their universe of experience. In 1951, political awakening was brought to Anioma people following years of neglect. Honorable Chief Dennis Osadebay (Oshimili); Honorable F.H.Utomi (Aniocha); Honorable Obi of Akumazi (Ika); Honorable Frank Oputa Ututu (Ndokwa) and Honorable Oki (Ndokwa) jointly moved a motion in the then Western House of Assembly to seek "a separate province" for our people, who hitherto had been balkanized and merged with Benin and Warri provinces by the colonialists. This merger was neither by referendum, choice nor by consent but by force. Even though Chief Obafemi Awolowo and his Action Group government had disallowed the creation of such a separate province, the movement for that self-determination has continued to this day. The record will show that no segment of the Nigerian society has had a longer demand for state creation than Anioma. However, the vagaries of politics have prevailed and the demand for the creation of Anioma State has remained unfulfilled. The struggle continues. Confronted by the failure of successive regimes to create Anioma State and by the paradoxical dicta of human social relations, Anioma people have endeavored to create a community, which sees itself as an organic whole dependent upon an integrated set of relationships with unique and distinguishable identity. Events of the distant past and indeed, of the recent past, namely, the Ekumuku wars, Colonization, Christianization, Westernization and the Nigeria-Biafra war, have conspired, as it were, to shape the consciousness of Anioma people. While not succumbing to introversion, Anioma people have seen remarkable distinctness in their behavior and overall worldview from those of their immediate neighbors. Anioma identity has become a treasure that must be guarded and defended because identity is a value for which people in history are willing to make sacrifices. Wars have been fought and are still being fought to preserve the identity of people. People refuse to be subsumed under someone else's worldview. Anioma people have for generations refused and indeed objected to the transposition of other people's interpretive categories on Anioma culture. Our forbears in Anioma fought the Ekumeku wars because they refused to be dominated by outsiders. They fought against the attempts by the Royal Niger Company and their British collaborators to desecrate the sanctity of their culture, appropriate their God-given wealth and dominate their trade and subjugate them. They fought against Benin expansionist proclivity. In short, they fought and defended their Anioma ethnic identity with whatever power they could muster. Ethnic identity exists because individuals include among their repertoire of social roles one or more culturally defined uniqueness. The conscious sense on the part of an individual that he/she belongs to a given collectivity is the basic building block of identity. Our Anioma ethnic identity derives from our common set of symbols and cognitions shared by our people. Aniocha, Ndokwa, lka and Oshimili, share the same cultural space and delimited physical geography. They dress alike. They dance alike. They use the same musical instruments. They speak the same or similar languages. They show the same deference to their elders and women. They respect character and integrity. They are not exploitative. Money is not everything, character is everything. In short, they have the same worldview. Our Anioma ethnic identity is cultural self-definition and philosophical affirmation of our self-determination as a people who see themselves at the crossroads of the contemporary Nigerian state. Anioma provides for us the physical and cultural space that define the necessary locus of our highest fulfillment as a people. Anioma does not seek to define its personality or identity simply as an antithesis of everything around it. However, one point must be made immutably clear to any questioner: no Anioma person wishes to be recast in a mould that is not Anioma. We must emphasize unequivocally, that only Anioma can provide us an essential part of our historical consciousness, and also an index to the universal psychic character of our identity. Only Anioma can communicate a sense of history to us. Granted that legend, folklore and history point to our diverse origin, over time our forbears were able to create a culture that is uniquely Anioma, hence no Aniocha person, Ndokwa person, Ika person nor Oshimill person, sees one another as strangers. Anioma people do not need to look elsewhere for inspiration and identity. Anioma is not and can never be an extension of another group. This is why for several decades its people have attempted to rid themselves of their psychic frustrations of marginality and neglect by clamoring for the creation of Anioma State. There is a strong sense of community and commonality between and among our people. There is shared neglect by the powers that be. There is shared suffering. There is shared poverty. Who can forget the torture and torments experienced by our people during the Nigeria-Biafra war? Our people still suffer from the haunting memories of that war. During that war, our people experienced macabre brutality delivered with breathless vapidity. Who can forget the Asaba massacre? Who can forget the Isheagu massacre? We shall not forget. Our children shall not forget. Nigeria must not forget. Since the end of that tragic war, it seems as if Anioma area still belongs to another age. Development as commonly understood is not just elusive but non- existent. The basic structure of inequality, inequity and iniquity has persisted despite many marginal adjustments in Nigeria's political terminology, dispensation and practice. Aniomaland remains in the throes of decay and decomposition. Our roads have fallen into inexcusable disrepair. Our primary and secondary school buildings are so dilapidated that they provide habitation to lizards and goats at night and pupils in the daytime. The schools lack basic science facilities. How can our children compete in this new millennium without scientific knowledge? The few hospitals we have lack basic amenities and so they are dysfunctional. Our people struggle daily against the triumvirate problems of poverty, ignorance and disease. What is more, politics seems to fall at the outer fringes of our people's life space. Many communities are without electricity and potable water. The evidence in Aniomaland, as recently as August/September 2000, draws a compelling portrait of a people oscillating between despair and unimagined possibilities. The atmosphere conveys with disturbing vividness, hopelessness and helplessness. Aniomaland pulsates with anxiety and unfulfilled expectations. Our people seem trapped by the synchronicity of time, place and fortune. Some of our seemingly able men and women appear overwhelmed by uncertainties and larger improbabilities about their future. Others are left awash in lethargy and despondency. Our agitated youths feel that competition for place and preferment, has left ethnicity in the center of public cognition of political struggle in Delta State. So, many of them are teetering between aimlessness and anger. There is, indeed, a compelling immediacy for us Anioma indigenes in the United States and elsewhere to act in order to stave off the growing dissonance of the public life of our people. The truth remains that Anioma is one of the least developed areas in Nigeria. It is a strange irony that Anioma sons and daughters have served Nigeria with distinction in various fields of human and intellectual endeavors, yet basic amenities are lacking in their homeland. These facts, notwithstanding, Anioma people wish to uphold, celebrate and elicit from Nigerians and other people, deference and devotion to the claims of their culture and history. There is now in Anioma, hue and cry for credible and dynamic leadership, Anioma people worldwide cannot afford to pass their time in vacuous inactivity. We must endeavor to narrow the widening horizons of parochial loyalties that undermine our unity, thus impeding our attempts to assist in the development of our homeland. United and committed, we are sure to fulfill the chiliastic expectations that the founding of Anioma Association, USA, Inc. has aroused in our people at home and abroad. We should replace our rampant individualism, which has had corrosive effect on our Anioma society, with an ethic of collective responsibility All rights and permissions have been granted by the author for the benefit of advancing the Cause of Anioma. Dr. Kunirum Osia was former national president of the Anioma Association, USA, Inc. from 1997 to 2002

Annalaxmi/ Temple of Fine Arts of Western Australia

Annalaxmi/ Temple of Fine Arts of Western Australia Annalaxmi/ Temple of Fine Arts of Western Australia Annalaxmi/ Temple of Fine Arts of Western Australia

Anthropologyworks open access annual publication

African Diaspora: open access annual publication Anthropologyworks open access annual publication As of August 2009, anthropologyworks joins the growing list of blogs related to the discipline of anthropology. Drawing on insights from contributors worldwide, I hope this blog will: provide an important place for highlighting what is new and important in anthropology and how anthropology connects to important current affairs share information and approaches for enhanced teaching within and beyond anthropology at all levels energize future research through exchange contribute to policy dialogue and policy formation lead to a more global anthropology that crosses regional divides help us be more informed about real people around the world, the challenges they face and how they are attempting to deal with them This blog is a project of the Culture in Global Affairs (CIGA) research and policy program of the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Along with several colleagues at GW and anthropological professionals working in the Washington area, I founded CIGA in 2002. Its mission is wide-ranging: to promote awareness of the relevance of anthropological knowledge to contemporary issues and to enhance discussion and debate within and beyond anthropology about contemporary issues. While centered on cultural anthropology, CIGA’s mission, and that of this blog, encompasses all four fields of anthropology as defined in anthropology: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology (in alphabetical order). For example, the situation of mountain gorillas in Rwanda and Uganda has much to do with poverty, employment, and cultural survival of forest peoples in the region. The effects of war and military occupation on archaeological sites in Iraq incontestably links the present with the past and with policy questions of culpability and compensation. From Aug. 2009 to Aug. 2010, Graham Hough-Cornell assisted with publishing the blog posts, and he contributed several guest posts as well. Graham received an M.A. in Middle East Studies at the Elliott School in 2010 and has an interest in culture and culinary history. From Sept. 2010 to July 2012, Erica Buckingham managed publishing blog posts. She received her M.A. in International Development Studies at the Elliott School in 2012 with a concentration in gender and anthropology. Starting in July 2012, Cait O’Donnell took over the publishing of blog posts. Cait has a B.A. from Berkeley in English and Global Poverty and Practices. She spent two years with the Peace Corps in Ukraine where she led civic education and HIV/AIDS-related initiatives. I am grateful for financial and other support from the Elliott School, and its Dean Michael E. Brown, which makes this blog possible. In the early design stages, I was expertly guided by Menachem Wecker, then working in the Elliott School’s public affairs group, and Jaclyn Schiff, a journalist/media consultant.

Anti-Slavery International

Anti-Slavery International Anti-Slavery International For a world free from slavery Founded in 1839, we are the oldest international human rights organisation in the world. Today, we draw on our experience to work to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world. We are not interested in easy solutions. Instead, we deal with the root causes of slavery and its consequences to achieve sustainable change. Our history Slave ship, Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Slave ship during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Over 175 years of fighting slavery 17 April 1839 The Anti-Slavery Society is formed by Thomas Clarkson, Thomas Fowell Buxton and other abolitionists to campaign against slavery worldwide. 1840 Convened the world’s first anti-slavery convention in London. 1841 - first international slavery conference Anti-Slavery organised the first ever international slavery convention. 1850 Developed ‘slave-free produce’ consumer action groups, promoting alternatives to slave plantation sugar. 1890 Helped establish the Brussels Act, the first comprehensive anti-slavery treaty, which allowed the inspection of ships and the arrest of anyone transporting slaves. 1904 – 1913 Campaigned against slavery practices perpetrated in the Congo Free State by King Leopold II of Belgium. The campaign eventually helped bring an end to Leopold’s tyranny. Man with the hand and foot of his five year old daughter. Alice Seeley Harris, who documented Belgian Congo abuses for Anti-Slavery Society. Nsala of Wala with the hand and foot of his five year old little girl. Photograph taken by Alice Seeley Harris, who documented Belgian Congo abuses for Anti-Slavery Society. 1920 Helped end the indentured labour system in the British colonies after campaigning against the use of Indian and Chinese “coolies”. 1921 Played a pivotal role in ending the activities of the Peruvian Amazon Company, which was using indigenous slave labour in rubber production. Peruvian Amazon Company Slavery One of Anti-Slavery’s biggest successes of early 20th century was ending slavery of indigenous people in Peru by the Peruvian Amazon Company. 1926 Successfully lobbied for the League of Nations inquiry into slavery, which resulted in the 1926 Slavery Convention that obliged all ratifying states to end slavery. 1956 Influenced the content of the Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery. 1984 Helped establish the Human Rights Fund for Indigenous People. 1995 Supported an Indian NGO initiative for the establishment of the Rugmark Foundation. 1994 An original supporter of the End Child Prostitution, Pornography and Trafficking campaign (ECPAT) and helped set up the UK branch. 1998 One of the organisers of the 1998 Global March against Child Labour, which helped lead to the adoption of a new ILO Convention on the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182). Young boy working in brick kiln in India Young boy working in a brick kiln in India. Anti-Slavery successfully campaigned for the adoption of the ILO Child Labour Convention 2000 Successfully campaigned for the abolishment of bonded labour practices in Nepal. 2003 With local NGO Timidria conducted a survey that led to the criminalisation of slavery in Niger. 2003 Lobbied the Brazilian government to introduce a National Plan for the Eradication of Slavery. 2004 Successfully lobbied to make trafficking of sexual and labour exploitation a criminal offence in the UK. 2005 Organised a major campaign which resulted in the United Arab Emirates freeing over 3,000 children trafficked to be used as camel jockeys, and UAE, Qatar and Kuwait abolishing the practice. Child camel jockey in the United Arab Emirates. Child camel jockey in the United Arab Emirates. Thanks to our campaign children have been replaced by robots to ride the camels at the races. 2005 Influenced the development of the Council of Europe Convention against trafficking in human beings, which is the first international standard to guarantee trafficked people minimum standards of protection and support. The convention was ratified by the UK government at the end of 2008. 2007 Helped push for the appointment of a UN Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Slavery. 2007 We successfully campaigned to criminalise slavery in Mauritania (2007). 2008 The United Nations’ decision to create a new Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Slavery. They will report directly to the UN Human Rights Council on measures that Governments need to take to tackle slavery practices in their respective countries. This is the first new UN mechanism on slavery in over 30 years. 2008 We supported a former slave, Hadijatou Mani in international ECOWAS (the Economic Community Of West African States) court that found the state of Niger guilty of failing to protect her from slavery . The ruling set a legal precedent for Niger and all other ECOWAS state to protect people from slavery. Hadijatou Mani, former slave who took her government to international court In 2008, Anti-Slavery International helped Hadijatou Mani to win a landmark case against the state of Niger for failing to protect her from slavery. 2010 Following the campaign by Anti-Slavery International and Liberty in June, the UK Parliament introduced a criminal offence of forced labour in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. 2011 Our Home Alone campaign played a big part in persuading the International Labour Organization to adopt a Convention on Decent Work for Domestic Workers in June 2011, which secures the rights of millions of domestic workers across the globe. 2011 We successfully campaigned to force the UK government to sign up to a new EU anti-trafficking law, providing legal basis for protection and justice for trafficking victims. Delivery of the petition demanding sign up to the EU Trafficking Directive We campaigned for the UK Government to sign up to the EU trafficking law that set the basis for protection of slavery victims in the UK. Today Moulkheir, victim of slavery in MauritaniaWe have a long history of making a difference and we continue to make it today. Check below what we do today to support people like Moulkheir out of slavery and to end this abuse across the world. We want you to join us in making a difference and support our work. Our vision Our vision is a world free from slavery. Our mission Our mission is to work directly and indirectly with beneficiaries and stakeholders from a grassroots to an international level to eradicate slavery and its causes from the world. Our strategy Anti-Slavery International strategy Click on the image to access full organisational strategy 2015-2020 in PDF Anti-Slavery’s strategic priority is to ensure significant progress towards slavery eradication in at least 10 countries by 2020 through working with beneficiaries and stakeholders from grassroots to international level to address slavery and its causes. Our key objectives are to: secure the responsiveness and accountability of duty bearers; empower people affected by slavery to claim their rights; achieve rejection of the social norms and attitudes perpetuating slavery. The evidence based knowledge from our projects underpins local to global advocacy aimed at achieving sustained, systemic change. This uniquely multi-level approach is a distinctive feature of our strategy. According to our 2015-2020 strategic plan, Anti-Slavery will have obtained significant changes in at least 10 countries, through the establishment of new, or effective implementation of existing national laws, policies or practices for the benefit of people affected by or vulnerable to slavery by 2020. Our strategic objectives reflect the key elements of Anti-Slavery’s Theory of Change: 1-Duty bearers are responsive and accountable to the rights and needs of people affected by and vulnerable to slavery: 1.1 – Drawing on demonstrated learning from Anti-Slavery’s partners and programmes, national governments and institutions, including law enforcement and judiciary, have introduced effective anti-slavery measures to address the causes and consequences of slavery in each country; 1.2 – Businesses have adopted effective approaches towards eliminating forced and child labour in business operations and supply chains; 1.3 – Slavery and its causes are recognised internationally as a fundamental development issue. 2-People affected by and vulnerable to slavery are empowered to understand, assert and claim their rights: 2.1 – People affected by and vulnerable to slavery have improved knowledge and understanding of the relevant legal framework, their rights, the corresponding responsibilities of relevant duty bearers, available mechanisms for support and redress, and the potential hazards of a range of livelihood options; 2.2 – People affected by and vulnerable to slavery have improved capacity and confidence to assert and claim their rights, participate in or lead collective representation, seek redress in the case of exploitation and make safer livelihoods choices. 3-The social norms and attitudes that underpin and perpetuate slavery are rejected: 3.1 – Local partner organisations effectively challenge the social norms and attitudes that underpin and perpetuate slavery in their countries and regions; 3.2 – Slavery eradication is recognised as an issue of political economy, requiring fundamental reform of trade and migration policy as well as the advancement of national and international rule of law; 3.3 – The international community recognise child and early marriage as a form of slavery; 3.4 – The international community recognise that discrimination, in particular caste discrimination and gender discrimination, are fundamental causes of slavery. 4-The impact and sustainability of the organisation is maximised: 4.1 – Efficient tools and processes support effective fundraising and communications; 4.2 – Efficient information technology systems and equipment effectively support organisational operations; 4.3 – An efficient organisational knowledge management system supports effective organisational operations and learning; 4.4 – The agreed organisational values are clearly reflected and embedded throughout the organisation. Our values We aim to demonstrate the following values through our work, both internally and externally: Transformative We work at all levels for long-term, sustainable, systemic change, challenging power structures, persisting until our aims have been achieved. Authoritative We are a knowledgeable and reliable organisation whose positions are developed through sustained human rights-based work with affected peoples and communities, and through rigorous, evidence-based research. Ethical We are an independent organisation whose decisions, actions and positions are drawn from a human rights-based approach to driving targeted social change, are consistently applied and are not shaped by vested interests such as governments or corporations. Equitable We are committed to fairness, non-discrimination and mutual respect, both internally and externally, in all of our decisions and actions, and the impartial fulfilment of each person’s human rights and dignity, including where this may involve taking affirmative action in favour of disadvantaged individuals and groups. Accountable We are responsible to a range of groups and individuals, both internally and externally, for the integrity of our actions and decisions, demonstrated through a proactive culture of openness and transparency. Collaborative We are strengthened by working together, through respectful, participatory collaboration and consultation, proactively identifying and involving marginalised and vulnerable groups.

Anuak Community Western Australia (ACWA)

Anuak Community Western Australia, ACWA Anuak Community Western Australia (ACWA) The Anyuak South Sudanese Community assists new arrivals from the Anyuak community of South Sudan to settle in WA. The association offers support with finding accommodation, driving lessons and assessing government and support systems. Volunteers from the association also help new arrivals with learning English and entering the education system.

ANZA

ANZA ANZA MISSION We exist to catalyse economic empowerment and community benefit in Tanzania’s Kilimanjaro region by partnering with aspiring entrepreneurs to incubate and accelerate social enterprises VISION Anza is a full service incubator for social enterprises. We’re a dynamic organisation dedicated to creating jobs and thriving communities in Tanzania’s Kilimanjaro region by empowering aspiring entrepreneurs with the vision, education, resources and network necessary to successfully start and scale social enterprises. Our approach integrates training and coaching in leadership, civic commitment and social entrepreneurship. We are partnering with aspiring entrepreneurs and assisting them, through our range of services to not only learn leadership but live leadership as models of integrity and social commitment as they lead successful, community­ minded enterprises.

Applause Africa Communications

Applause Africa Communications Applause Africa Communications 1 - BRAND: Applause Africa Communications is an innovative media brand for the progressive African in Diaspora, with a strong editorial focus on the people, innovations, cultures, businesses, leadership, philosophies and successes of Diaspora Africa. Applause Africa magazine and applauseafrica.com inspire our readers to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead conversations, and create the future for a better Africa by celebrating, empowering and connecting Africans in the Diaspora and on the continent. Applause Africa magazine inspires a new generation of thought leaders, committed to active engagement to shape, demystify and expose the true beauty and potential of the continent, Africa. 2 - VISION: Our vision is to claim the ownership of our stories by focusing on the virtues and successes of the people of African Diaspora. Applause Africa is committed to raising the consciousness of Africans about their collective responsibility and effort to help build a better Africa by becoming the change they envision. 3 - MISSION: The mission is to Celebrate, Empower and Connect the people, culture, and ambitions of Africans in Diaspora.?Through our print magazine, website, and events Applause Africa shares the achievements and ideas of our community as a platform for generational change. We Africans in Diaspora are a positive, intelligent and creative group; for that, we each deserve an Applause.

Arab Alliance Chamber Commerce of Washington State

Arab Alliance Chamber Commerce of Washington State Arab Alliance Chamber Commerce of Washington State Arab Alliance Chamber Commerce of Washington State has operated under the name of Arab American Chamber Commerce of Washington State since 2003. However, due to the trademark of the title we had to change the name. Although the name has slightly changed the acronyms of AACCWA, AACCWA logo, and the website will be still be the same. The AACCWA is derived to help local Arab business in Washington State to grow and be part of the global economy of America. The AACCWA will provide resources and networking to strengthen those business locally and nationally. The AACCWA will offer a series of workshop and conferences to provide information and resources on how to improve your business and reach out more to your stakeholders. We are hoping with your support the Arab Alliance Chamber Commerces of WA will grow and provide more necessary services and resouces for your needs. President of AACCWA

Arab America

Arab America, Arab diaspora, Arab diaspora, Arab in America Arab America Arab America is a national website founded with the purpose of promoting an accurate image about the Arab American community and the Arab world. With close to four million Arab Americans in the U.S., Arab America’s primary goal is to become a “bridge” bringing together the diverse Arab American community. Secondly, Arab America is an educational resource site for all Americans. Arab America’s mission is achieved through the dissemination of accurate information about Arab Americans and the Arab world providing: up to date events, the latest news, Arabic restaurants and ethnic grocery outlets, churches, mosques, cultural and social service organizations, commerce, and music. It is the intent of Arab America to be the leader in providing digital media to Arab Americans. - See more at: http://www.arabamerica.com/about/#sthash.EC5vgja8.dpuf

Arab Chamber of Commerce

Arab Chamber of Commerce Arab Chamber of Commerce ABOUT THE CHAMBER For more than 45 years, the Arab Chamber of Commerce has brought Arab area businesses together to promote economic growth and prosperity. Founded by a small group of businessmen in 1963, the Chamber has grown to over 300 members and continues to unite businesses and individuals for the common purpose of improving the community in which we live and work. Committed to the community and our member businesses, the chamber serves as: An Advocate Promoting entrepreneurial activity and encouraging existing industry expansion and retention A Resource Providing leadership training and networking opportunities to further business growth A Partner Enhancing workforce initiatives to meet the needs of a growing business community A Leader Encouraging government support and community action in the improvement of overall quality of life

Arabic Music

Arabic Music Arabic Music Arabic Music in all its wonder, glory and charm speaks volumes of a beautiful culture that transcends geographical barriers in the Arab World, and brings a nostalgic feeling of home away from home. The grandeur of the Lebanese Dabkeh the splendor of Egyptian belly dancing, the intricate Khaleeji dance music and the enchanting North African beat all blends together to make up the fabric of a musical culture that is so exceptional and uniquely captivating. Layali Carthage Band & Dj Stars Music & Folklore can bring to your Weddings, Anniversaries, Social Events, Parties and Dances the most beautiful Arabic Music of all time with crystal clear and crisp digital sound to create that wonderful atmosphere they will always remember.

Ardhi University

Ardhi University Ardhi University Ardhi University

Armenian American Wellness Center

Armenian American Wellness Center, Armenian diaspora Armenian American Wellness Center The Armenian American Wellness Center is a state-of-the-art diagnostic facility with the latest Western technology and training. It has become the champion of preventive health care in Armenia. It is exemplary for its humanitarian initiative, Western-style financial and administrative accountability, transparency and cost-effectiveness, and for providing a corruption-free workplace. It provides screening and diagnostic services to women and families of Armenia in 8 departments in Yerevan, at a Satellite Clinic in Gavar and through free of charge monthly medical missions to remote regions of the country. The Wellness Center is the humanitarian project of the Armenian American Cultural Association, Inc. (AACA), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization incorporated in the United States (U.S.) in 1995. Our Mission To save, prolong and improve the lives of women through early and accurate detection of their breast and cervical cancer and to provide primary health care services to ensure the good health and well-being of families in Armenia. Our Vision As a state-of-the-art Primary Health Care facility, the Wellness Center’s Vision is to become a Regional Health Center providing quality diagnosis and treatment onsite for the women, men and children of Armenia as well as the entire Caucasus Region.

Armenian Assembly of America

Armenian Assembly of America Armenian Assembly of America Headquartered in Washington, DC, the Armenian Assembly of America is the largest, non-partisan Armenian-American advocacy organization in the United States. Since 1972, the Assembly continues to promote public awareness of Armenian issues, encourage greater Armenian-American participation in the American democratic process, and assist in humanitarian and development programs in Armenia and Nagorno Karabakh, while strengthening the U.S.-Armenia and U.S.-Nagorno Karabakh relationships.

Armenian Cultural Association of America, Inc. (ACAA)

Armenian Cultural Association of America, ACAA Armenian Cultural Association of America, Inc. (ACAA) The Armenian Cultural Association of America, Inc. (ACAA) was organized in February of 1969 with the following purposes: To assist and support needy and impoverished people of Armenian origin; To assist, support and encourage institutions, such as homes for the aged, orphanages and schools organized and functioning to aid those of Armenian origin in their general welfare; To assist, support and encourage educational institutions and charitable organizations which encourage and develop the Armenian cultural heritage; To aid students, authors, artists and researchers who are pursuing intellectual efforts in the areas of Armenian culture and education; To publish educational, scientific and literary books which reflect Armenian culture, with the object of raising the educational, cultural and intellectual standards of the community. The ACAA sponsors projects both in the Republic of Armenia and the Diaspora such as cultural and educational activities, research on Armenian topics, grants to Armenian newspapers, publications and other media outlets, and internships. It also serves as a repository of historic Armenian national documents and archives.

Armenian Diaspora Magazine

Armenian Diaspora Magazine, Armenian Diaspora Armenian Diaspora Magazine Bienvenue sur Arménie Diasporamag, l’agenda des petites Arménies de France, de Belgique et de Suisse avec une sélection de spectacles, conférences, événements, soirées jeunes, fiestas, rencontres sportives. Vous aussi, faites votre buzz sur Diasporamag, annoncez votre actualité : c'est gratuit ! Diasporamag est une passerelle, empruntez-la ! Diasporamag : une vitrine pour les écoles, la presse et les associations arméniennes, mais aussi un annuaire des prestataires. Donnez du sens à vos achats, privilégiez nos annonceurs.

Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA)

Armenian National Committee of America, ANCA, Armenian diaspora Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA) The Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA) is the largest and most influential Armenian American grassroots political organization. Working in coordination with a network of offices, chapters and supporters throughout the United States and affiliated organizations around the world, the ANCA actively advances the concerns of the Armenian American community on a broad range of issues. The main goals of the ANCA are: >> To foster public awareness in support of a free, united and independent Armenia; >> To influence and guide U.S. policy on matters of interest to the Armenian American community; >> To represent the collective Armenian American viewpoint on matters of public policy, while serving as liaison between the community and their elected officials. The Armenian National Committee of America is active in a number of areas and engages in a wide variety of political and educational activities, including: Initiating legislation on issues of concern to the Armenian American community, such as strengthening Armenia as a secure, prosperous and democratic state; supporting Nagorno Karabagh’s right to self-determination and independence within secure borders; increasing U.S. aid levels to Armenia to promote economic and democratic development; securing direct U.S. aid to Nagorno Karabagh; ensuring the appropriate commemoration of the Armenian Genocide; and encouraging Turkey and Azerbaijan to lift their blockades and adhere to international standards for human rights and humanitarian practices. Participating in the American electoral process at the federal, state, and local levels by educating elected officials about Armenian American issues and providing Armenian American voters with up-to-date information about the positions of candidates on Armenian American concerns. The ANCA regularly endorses candidates, organizes voter registration drives, and distributes Candidate Questionnaires, Congressional Report Cards and Election Guides to Armenian American voters. Publishing congressional testimony, position papers, press releases, fact sheets, and regional newsletters.

Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale

Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale The Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale chapter has been an important presence for Armenian-American political action for several decades. Our efforts span a wide range including: meeting with public officials about issues affecting our community, conducting voter outreach campaigns, publicizing the Armenian Cause, educating the community, fighting historic revisionism, and promoting recognition of the Armenian Genocide. The ANCA- Glendale Chapter works to make Armenian -merican interests effectively part of the political dialogue of our governments and of our own community. Most recently, the Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale Chapter has worked with the Glendale Police and Fire Departments to increase diversity in our local emergency response units. We have also been working with various city officials and departments on issues of low income housing, public parks and open space in South Glendale, and more Armenian-American representation on city committees. Furthermore, the ANCA- Glendale Chapter is actively collaborating with a variety of community organizations to help ensure the needs of our community are met. Some organizations and local events the ANCA- Glendale Chapter has supported include the American Red Cross, City of Glendale- Commission on the Status of Women, City of Glendale- Week of Remembrance, Glendale Relay for Life, Glendale Educational Foundation, and YWCA. The Armenian National Committee of America- Glendale Chapter believes that it is essential to raise the future generation with an understanding of and respect for the political process. Therefore, the organization works closely with community youth in order to engage them in the political process. Along with our National and Western Regional term,ANCA and ANC – Western Region, we facilitate volunteering and internship opportunities for youth, both within the organization as well as in the community. In the past, the ANCA- Glendale Chapter has worked with the Armenian Youth Federation and other youth groups to help put on educational forums on issues ranging from gangs and violence to the political process and activism.

Armenian National Committee of Canada (ANCC)

Armenian National Committee of Canada (ANCC), Armenia diaspora, armenia in Canada, canadian diaspora Armenian National Committee of Canada (ANCC) The Armenian National Committee of Canada (ANCC), founded in 1965, is the largest and most influential Armenian-Canadian grassroots human rights organization. Working in coordination with a network of chapters, supporters throughout Canada, and affiliated organizations around the world, the ANCC actively advances the concerns of the Armenian-Canadian community on a broad range of issues. The ANCC seeks to: Foster public awareness about issues affecting the Armenian community in Canada and abroad; Represent the collective Armenian-Canadian viewpoint on matters of public interest; Act as an advocacy group on matters of interest to the Armenian-Canadian community; Support and promote human rights issues in Canada; Serve as a liaison between the community and their elected officials, non-governmental agencies, and others.

Armenian News for Diaspora

Armenian News for Diaspora Armenian News for Diaspora Armenian News for Diaspora is .... The Blog system gives you your own personal space at Armenian Diaspora News Forum. Depending on how the administrator has configured the blog, you will be able to create your own entries and control who may view them.

Armenian Volunteer Corps

Armenian Volunteer Corps Armenian Volunteer Corps Welcome to the Armenian Volunteer Corps (AVC) blog. Here our volunteers and alumni reflect on their experiences living and volunteering in Armenia. For more information about our programs, visit our website www.armenianvolunteer.org, follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Armenianvolunteer or drop us an email: info@avc.am

ARTHIS - LA MAISON CULTURELLE BELGO-ROUMAINE ASBL

ARTHIS - LA MAISON CULTURELLE BELGO-ROUMAINE ASBL ARTHIS - LA MAISON CULTURELLE BELGO-ROUMAINE ASBL Arthis is an association recognized by the Federation Wallonia-Brussels that works to improve and accelerate the integration of people from Eastern Europe. The association reaches this goal through the enhancement of their own culture and also through the learning of the new host culture. Arthis organizes activities in the areas: -artistic: concerts, exhibitions, conferences, debates,theater, film screenings -social: interpreting and translation services, intercultural mediation service and collective legal consultations with Belgian and Romanian specialists for topics of general interest (work permit, certification of diplomas) -social-cultural: language courses (French, Dutch, Romanian), literacy, introductory courses Computer for people of the third age, art workshops for children. INDUSTRY: Arts & Culture, Education, Gender Equality/Women's Empowerment ACTIVITIES: Consulting/Training, Events

Aruba Tourism Authority

Aruba Tourism Authority, Aruba diaspora Aruba Tourism Authority ARUBA - ONE HAPPY ISLAND For total relaxation, alabaster beaches and gentle seas are good for the soul. At resort spas, regain inner harmony and indulge in an exotic menu of indulgent treatments. Or… rock your world with wet ‘n wild adventures, deep sea diving, windsurfing, kitesurfing…even parasailing and sky diving! Tee off on a championship golf course,

Asaba Progressive Union, Atlanta Chapter

Asaba Progressive Union, Atlanta Chapter Asaba Progressive Union, Atlanta Chapter Asaba Progressive Union, Inc. is a 501(c)(3), tax exempt, not-for-profit organization incorporated in Atlanta, in the State of Georgia, in the United States of America (USA). The organization?s members and executives are 100% volunteers that represent a group of like-minded people who saw the need for combining their individual strengths and diverse professional and educational backgrounds to embark on charitable and philanthropic causes for the betterment of the underprivileged members of our Asaba community.

Ascina - Austrian scientists and scholars in the USA, Canada and Mexico

Ascina, Austrian scientists and scholars in the USA, Canada and Mexico Ascina - Austrian scientists and scholars in the USA, Canada and Mexico Ascina is the network of Austrian scientists and scholars in the USA, Canada, Mexico. Its objective is to support Austrian scientists and scholars in North America and to facilitate interactions between Austrian scientists and scholars and international research institutions. Diaspora science networks have seen a proliferation of interest in recent times and other keynote platforms include: Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology in the Arab World, Swiss Network of Scientific Diasporas, The Chinese American Engineers and Scientists Association of Southern California (CESASC), Turkish-American Scientists and Scholars Association, Caribbean Diaspora for Science, Technology and Innovation, Egyptian American Scientists Association (Egypt), and Malaysian Scientific Diaspora Network (MSDN)

Asha for Education

Asha for Education Asha for Education Asha for Education is a secular organization dedicated to socio-economic change in India through education of underprivileged children. It supports education-related projects in India, and forms links between these projects and their supporters in the USA and other countries.

Ashesi University College

Ashesi University College Ashesi University College Ashesi University College

Ashoka - Innovators for the Public

Ashoka - Innovators for the Public Ashoka - Innovators for the Public Vision: To advance an Everyone a Changemaker world, where anyone can apply the skills of changemaking to solve complex social problems. Mission: To support social entrepreneurs who are leading and collaborating with changemakers, in a team of teams model that addresses the fluidity of a rapidly evolving society. Ashoka believes that anyone can learn and apply the critical skills of empathy, team work, leadership and changemaking to be successful in the modern world.

Asia Foundation

Asia Foundation, asian diaspora Asia Foundation The Asia Foundation is a nonprofit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our programs address critical issues affecting Asia in the 21st century—governance and law, economic development, women's empowerment, environment, and regional cooperation. In addition, our Books for Asia and professional exchange programs are among the ways we encourage Asia's continued development as a peaceful, just, and thriving region of the world. Headquartered in San Francisco, The Asia Foundation works through a network of offices in 18 Asian countries and in Washington, DC. Working with public and private partners, the Foundation receives funding from a diverse group of bilateral and multilateral development agencies, foundations, corporations, and individuals. In 2014, we provided more than $108 million in direct program support and distributed textbooks and other educational materials valued at over $11 million. OUR APPROACH Internationally recognized for our commitment to Asia's development, the Foundation brings together local individuals, communities, and governments who are shaping Asia's future.

ASIA NEWS NETWORK

ASIA NEWS NETWORK, ANN ASIA NEWS NETWORK The Asia News Network (ANN) is a network of 21 media groups in Asian cities, organized to provide avenues for cooperation and to optimize coverage of major news events in the region. » BACKGROUND The networking of newspapers in Asia was first discussed informally by the Asian editors who participated in the first Asian-German Editors' Forum organized by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in Manila. Encouraged by the warm fellowship among them and the success of the forum, the editors decided that a more permanent professional and business relationship be pursued not only among themselves but among their respective publications with the goal of improving the coverage of Asian affairs by Asian media. In March 1999, ANN was born. » OBJECTIVES 1. To enhance and improve news coverage of Asian affairs. 2. To provide member newspapers with reliable access to news sources in Asia. 3. To help promote the professional development of journalism in the region. » OPERATING MECHANISM 1. All members shall be free to publish news stories, analyses, features and photographs from the network members. 2. Each network member will contribute a least five stories everyday from which other members may choose to print in their publications. The contributions may include any kind of story that may be deemed useful to the others, such as politics, regional conflicts, economy, human interest, and sports. Photographs may also be requested from any of the network members. 3. The newspaper that was the source of the story, analysis or photograph shall be given credit in the publication that uses these, along with the network. For example: The Jakarta Post/Asia News Network. Bylines of reporters shall be at the discretion of the editors. 4. Each member shall appoint an editor to the network with whom ANN members can communicate regarding specific requirements. A central coordinator shall be appointed to look after the daily contributions of the network members. The position of central coordinator shall be rotated quarterly. 5. Network members shall help one another whenever they can through sharing of facilities and manpower. In the event of coverage by a reporter of one newspaper to another member's country, the network member in "host" country shall extend support by means of free use of its library system and email and make available contacts known by the "host". On certain occasions, special arrangements may also be made among network members. The network member requesting the coverage shall bear the direct costs incurred in the assignment. 6. A network member may request special reports and background information from any of the other members. A member should try to deliver on a best effort basis but may decline if the request requires extensive work and additional resources. 7. Network members may embark on an exchange program for their journalists, either on a bilateral basis or as a group.

Asia Society

Cambodian Diaspora, Asia Society Asia Society Asia Society is the leading educational organization dedicated to promoting mutual understanding and strengthening partnerships among peoples, leaders and institutions of Asia and the United States in a global context. Across the fields of arts, business, culture, education, and policy, the Society provides insight, generates ideas, and promotes collaboration to address present challenges and create a shared future. Founded in 1956 by John D. Rockefeller 3rd, Asia Society is a nonpartisan, nonprofit institution with headquarters in New York, centers in Hong Kong and Houston, and offices in Los Angeles, Manila, Mumbai, San Francisco, Seoul, Shanghai, Sydney, and Washington, DC.

Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies at Berkeley University

Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, Berkeley, AAADS Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies at Berkeley University The Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies (AAADS) Program, one of the programs under the Department of Ethnic Studies, is dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of historical and contemporary experiences of Asian-ancestry groups in local, national, and global contexts. Asian American is a pan-ethnic term designating a racialized population made up of various groups of Asian ancestry, and encompassing both the foreign-born and the U.S.-born. As initially constituted as a component of the emergent field of ethnic studies in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Asian American Studies program centered on domestic U.S. concerns. It continues to be part of a national activist effort to increase the political, economic and cultural representation of people of color in American life, more specifically, to improve the educational relevance and ethnic diversity of institutions of higher learning. However, the Asian American Studies program has also been responsive to the shifting geopolitical, economic and sociocultural forces most conveniently summed up by the term globalization, and is now increasingly attentive to issues of transnationality and diaspora while retaining its original commitment to community empowerment. honor6853 Mission The AAADSP is committed to expanding and enriching the intellectual fabric of the entire academy by contributing to: the critical understanding of the rich and complex histories and experiences of Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander ancestry; the framing of this knowledge and understanding within larger intellectual inquiries regarding race and ethnicity in national and global contexts; the development of critical thinking and innovative learning through a socially engaged research and teaching curriculum; the promotion of comparative, multi- and inter disciplinary approaches to the study of the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans in local, national, and global contexts; the strengthening of relationship between the university and the community by fusing academic learning with community engagement.

Asian Diaspora - tribe.net

Asian Diaspora - tribe.net Asian Diaspora - tribe.net At tribe.net, we believe in the power of connecting to other people to get things done. Since that can be surprisingly hard in a city, we founded tribe.net to make it easier. Whether it's for finding the right job, a killer apartment, a good restaurant, a gentle dentist, or a hiking buddy, we think those tasks are best done by connecting with other local people for advice and sharing. The people you connect to can be your friends, people who live in your neighborhood, or people who live in your city that share a common interest with you. Tribe.net makes finding those people easier. You can invite friends, search for people with similar interests, and join or create tribes (member-created online groups) dedicated to interests you might have. The more people you're connected to, the better tribe.net will work for you. For all this to work, we have to build an online community in which people feel comfortable sharing their knowledge (and questions). So we have a thorough privacy policy, which you should read, and we give users lots of control over which pieces of their personal information get displayed to whom, and how and whether they are contacted by other community members. It's also why we require people to register and create profiles in order to post to Local Favorites, Services, or individual tribes. As in any good community, you should be accountable (to the community) for what you say and do. And also as with any good community, you have to be an active citizen to get the most out of it. The service is provided to you free of charge, and we're going to do our best to keep it that way. Our intention is to derive revenue from commercial uses such as job postings.

Asian Diaspora Platform

Asian Diaspora Platform, asian diaspora, diaspora asia Asian Diaspora Platform Helping Asia and the Asian Diaspora to Find and Engage with Each Other and with Opportunities Anywhere ... See https://www.diasporaengager.com/Asian

Asian Foundation for Philanthropy (AFP)

Asian Foundation for Philanthropy, AFP Asian Foundation for Philanthropy (AFP) 1- Who we are : The Asian Foundation for Philanthropy (AFP) was established as a registered charity in 2005 to mobilise British Asians, predominantly Indians and inspire them to contribute towards poverty reduction in India. Indians in the UK constitute one of the largest populations of Indians outside India. Yet the level of their engagement in mainstream development aid discourse has been fairly limited. By engaging this community with philanthropy and introducing them to novel ways of contributing we have been striving to channel their energy towards the poorest of the poor. Some of the avenues we developed to enable this process include our International volunteering programme, working with Asian businesses in the UK on corporate social responsibility (CSR), bringing Asian youth on board with ethical fashion, building on leadership skills of volunteers to transform them into community champions among others. Our wide-ranging activities have attracted businesses, students as well as professionals to reconnect with their cultural heritage and take positive action. 2 Asian Foundation for Philanthropy (AFP) inspires social change by creating an innovative movement of positive action through raising awareness and sharing skills. We work in the UK and India and support ethical initiatives of grass root communities. Our social enterprise 'Naitika' supports artisans, women's cooperatives and other local community groups to produce natural and handcrafted products in an eco-friendly and fair working environment.

Asian People's Disability Alliance (APDA)

Asian People's Disability Alliance, APDA Asian People's Disability Alliance (APDA) The Asian People's Disability Alliance (APDA) is a user-led registered charity of Asian disabled people.The Organisation's aim being to increase the numbers of Asian pwd accessing mainstream health and social care services by APDA offering such services itself in collaboration and partnership with mainstream providers.APDA runs a volunteering programme in Sri Lanka, supporting Asian people with disabilities, that are marginalised and do not receive any services or support. Mission: APDA aims to provide needs-led and user-led culturally-appropriate services that mainstream service providers are unable to provide because of limited or no expertise in culturally-related matters of Asian disabled people, their carers and their families.The organisation seeks to work in partnership and in collaboration with service planners and other mainstream bodies to help incorporate the particular needs of APDA's client groups in service planning and other programmes that affect their lives.It also strives to act as a resource for Asian disabled people, their carers and families for consultation, peer support, exchange of information and ideas etc. and as facilitators in their social development.

Asian Philanthropy Forum

Asian Philanthropy Forum Asian Philanthropy Forum Asian Philanthropy Forum curates the ongoing discussions in the philanthropic sector and highlights leaders and organizations that are working to improve the quality of life and sustainability of Asian communities. We are a project of Kordant Philanthropy Advisors, a global philanthropy research and advisory firm. We work with families and leading businesses and institutions to build and influence the capabilities of world-class philanthropic enterprises and initiatives.

Asociatiei Pro-diaspora France

Asociatiei Pro-diaspora France, diaspora france Asociatiei Pro-diaspora France Blogul oficial al Asociatiei Pro-diaspora France ..

Aspen Institute

Aspen Institute Aspen Institute The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute has campuses in Aspen, Colorado, and on the Wye River on Maryland?s Eastern Shore. It also maintains offices in New York City and has an international network of partners.

Aspen Institute

Aspen Institute Aspen Institute The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Our mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute has campuses in Aspen, Colorado, and on the Wye River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. It also maintains offices in New York City and has an international network of partners. The Aspen Institute does this primarily in four ways: Seminars, which help participants reflect on what they think makes a good society, thereby deepening knowledge, broadening perspectives and enhancing their capacity to solve the problems leaders face. Young-leader fellowships around the globe, which bring a selected class of proven leaders together for an intense multi-year program and commitment. The fellows become better leaders and apply their skills to significant challenges. Policy programs, which serve as nonpartisan forums for analysis, consensus building, and problem solving on a wide variety of issues. Public conferences and events, which provide a commons for people to share ideas.

ASPEN INSTITUTE'S DIASPORA INVESTMENT ALLIANCE

ASPEN INSTITUTE'S DIASPORA INVESTMENT ALLIANCE ASPEN INSTITUTE'S DIASPORA INVESTMENT ALLIANCE The mission of The Aspen Institute's Diaspora Investment Alliance is to create practical pathways for diaspora communities to make strategic investments which have social and financial impact in their countries of origin.

ASSEMBLY OF FRENCH CITIZENS ABROAD - Assemblée des Français de l'étranger

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Assenna.com

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Association des Beninois de Indiana, ABI-Etats-Unis ASSOCIATION des BENINOIS a INDIANA Espace d'Information, de discussion amicales, de concertation et de decision des membres de l'Association des Beninois a Indiana. Les objectifs sont de : •Regrouper les ressortissants béninois a Indiana •Renforcer la cohésion entre eux. •Assister à la sécurité des Béninois et à la protection de leur intérêt socio- économique et culturel. •Représenter les Béninois partout où besoin sera a Indiana. •Promouvoir la culture et l’art béninois a Indiana. •Assister momentanément les nouveaux émigrants béninois desireux de s’installer a Indiana. •Organiser des activités récréatives afin de consolider les liens de solidarité entre Béninois résidant a Indiana. •Mettre sur pied une stratégie de vulgarisation de l’information par l’utilisation de la haute technologie( l’outil informatique). •Assister les compatriotes en cas de malheur ( décès, accident, maladie, perte d’emploi, rapatriement), et de bonheur. Soyez le bienvenu dans la solidarite BENINOISE pour des discussions progressistes et fraternelles. Group Information Members :84 Category : Countries and Cultures Founded :Jun 18, 2008 Language :English Group Settings This is a restricted group. Attachments are permitted. Members cannot hide email address. Listed in Yahoo Groups directory. Membership requires approval. Messages require approval. All members can post messages. Group Email Addresses Post Message : abi_indiana@yahoogroups.com Subscribe : abi_indiana-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Unsubscribe : abi_indiana-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com List Owner : abi_indiana-owner@yahoogroups.com

ASSOCIATION des BENINOIS a INDIANA

ASSOCIATION des BENINOIS a INDIANA, diaspora beninoise, beninese diaspora, diaspora benin ASSOCIATION des BENINOIS a INDIANA Group Description Espace d'Information, de discussion amicales, de concertation et de decision des membres de l'Association des Beninois a Indiana. Les objectifs sont de : •Regrouper les ressortissants béninois a Indiana •Renforcer la cohésion entre eux. •Assister à la sécurité des Béninois et à la protection de leur intérêt socio- économique et culturel. •Représenter les Béninois partout où besoin sera a Indiana. •Promouvoir la culture et l’art béninois a Indiana. •Assister momentanément les nouveaux émigrants béninois desireux de s’installer a Indiana. •Organiser des activités récréatives afin de consolider les liens de solidarité entre Béninois résidant a Indiana. •Mettre sur pied une stratégie de vulgarisation de l’information par l’utilisation de la haute technologie( l’outil informatique). •Assister les compatriotes en cas de malheur ( décès, accident, maladie, perte d’emploi, rapatriement), et de bonheur. Soyez le bienvenu dans la solidarite BENINOISE pour des discussions progressistes et fraternelles.

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Association des Beninois de Nebraska Association des Beninois de Nebraska Le blog de BENIN DIASPORA USA, Inc. Conception des Régions et Associations Représentatives/Identifiées & Pratique des Elections pour la Seconde Conférence Economique Indianapolis, IN I.1 Conception des Régions et Associations Identifiées La structure proposée a été conçue en tenant compte des Associations existantes à la date de 7 Janvier 2012 lorsque cette structure a été finalement adoptée par tous les membres de la Commission 1 Administration et Redynamisation de Benin Diaspora USA. I.1.1 REGION NORTHEST (13 Etats) Il y a quatre zones. Chaque zone a une association (plusieurs associations Identifiées). Voici la situation que la Commission 1 a enregistré : (faites vos corrections) I.1.1.1 ZONE 1NEst: New York – New Jersey –Connecticut identifiée par l’Alliance NY-NJ-CT I.1.1.2 ZONE 2NEst: Maryland-Virginia-Washington DC identifiée par trois associations identifies: Union des Béninois pour le Développement Economique (UBEDE) – Organisation des Béninois de Washington Métropolitain (OBEWAME)-Association des Béninois de Baltimore (ABB) I.1.1.3 ZONE 3NEst: Pennsylvania-Delaware-West Virginia. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée I.1.1.4 ZONE 4NEst: Massachusetts-Rhodes Island-New Hampshire-Vermont-Maine. Identifiée par l’ARSB-NEW ENGLAND (corriger les noms !) I.1.2 REGION SUD (12 Etats) Il y a quatre zones. Chaque zone a une association (ou plusieurs associations identifiées). Voici la situation que la Commission 1 a enregistré : (faites vos corrections) I.1.2.1 ZONE 1Sud: North Carolina-Kentucky-Tennessee. Identifiée par Association des Béninois de North Carolina I.1.2.2 ZONE 2Sud: Georgia-Florida-South Carolina. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.2.3 ZONE 3Sud: Alabama-Mississipi-Arkansas. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.2.4 ZONE 4Sud: Texas-Louisiana-Oklahoma. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.3 REGION MIDWEST (12 Etats) Il y a quatre zones. Chaque zone a une association (ou plusieurs associations identifiées). Voici la situation que la Commission 1 a enregistré : (faites vos corrections) I.1.3.1 ZONE 1MWest: Indiana-Ohio-Michigan. Identifiée par Association des Béninois à Indiana (ABI) et formation d’une association à Michigan I.1.3.2 ZONE 2MWest : Illinois-Iowa-Wisconsin. Identifiée par Association des Béninois à Illinois. I.1.3.3 ZONE 3MWest: Nebraska-Kansas-Missouri. Identifiée par Association des Béninois à Nebraska en formation I.1.3.4 ZONE 4MWest: Minnesota- North Dakota-South Dakota. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.4 REGION WEST (13 Etats) Il y a quatre zones. Chaque zone a une association (ou plusieurs associations identifiées). Voici la situation que la Commission 1 a enregistré : (faites vos corrections) I.1.4.1 ZONE 1West: California-Nevada-Hawaii. Identifiée par Association des Béninois de California I.1.4.2 ZONE 2West: Oregon-Washington-Alaska. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.4.3 ZONE 3MWest: Idaho-Montana-Wyoming. Aucune Association Béninoise réellement identifiée. I.1.4.4 ZONE 4MWest: Colorado-Utah-Arizona-New Mexico. Identifiée par Association des Béninois à Colorado I.2. Développement des Zones et de la Région L’unité cellulaire de Benin Diaspora USA est l’Association des Béninois au niveau de chaque Etat. À cet effet, la Commission 1 a estimé que si 3 à 10 Béninois s’identifient dans un Etat où il n’y a aucune association des Béninois ou bien dans l’Etat où l’Association/Alliance existante se refuse de reconnaitre/s’adhérer à Benin Diaspora USA, ces 3 à 10 Béninois peuvent constituer l’unité cellulaire de Benin Diaspora compte tenu de la loi 1901 qui permet la libre associative de la société civile en vigueur dans notre pays la République du Benin. Toutefois, la nouvelle unité cellulaire doit prendre contact avec les responsables des autres Etats qui forment la Zone de la Région pour une assistance possible aussi bien de la Zone que de la Région. Les Associations de chaque Etat membres de Benin Diaspora USA (celles qui sont déjà formées prennent l’initiative au niveau de chaque zone) vont contacter les Associations des autres Etats qui sont formées ou en voie de formation pour commencer par travailler ensemble dans leur zone. L’Association/Alliance existante qui reconnait Benin Diaspora USA peut directement se considérer comme une Zone immédiate de Benin Diaspora USA et n’a plus besoin d’aller dans le processus de la formation de Zone. Cette Alliance/Association peut commencer immédiatement à travailler pour développer la Région à laquelle elle appartient. I.3 Domaine d’Intervention des Zones-Régions-Bureau Exécutif Fédéral/Benin Diaspora USA Introduction : Bénin Diaspora USA est une institution qui a la vision d'englober tous les Béninois vivant sur le territoire national des Etats-Unis d'Amérique quelle que soit leur appartenance à d'autres organisations culturelles, sociales et professionnelles. La vision est d’élever la participation de tous les Béninois au niveau de chaque Etat (institution de base) pour former chaque Région, sous-institution de la Diaspora Béninoise aux USA afin que, sous la bannière de notre logo qui dit « UNIS, NOUS SOMMES FORTS », chaque Béninois et chaque Béninoise travaillent pour améliorer leur vie, aider leurs enfants, et contribuer au développement économique du Benin. 1.3.1 Unité Cellulaire (Etat) – Zones – Régions Dans la phase de développement qui pourrait s’étendre sur un certain nombre d’années à programmer, chaque région doit se développer de façon autonome pour atteindre les objectifs d’améliorer les conditions de vie des membres de la région et d’aider et promouvoir leurs enfants. Spécifiquement les appellations suivantes sont suggérées pour éviter une répétition de titres qui engendrait des confusions. De façon générale, les objectifs d’Etat – Zones – Régions se définissent comme suit : 1. Servir de centre de ressources pour les possibilités d'investissement au Bénin 2. Servir de centre de ressources humaines et d'accumulation des compétences à enrichir par des études et des recherches. 3. Servir de plateforme pour l'organisation des conférences de réflexion 4. Initier des actions pour supporter une législation pour les intérêts du Bénin et de l'Afrique en général 5. Supporter la vision économique et le volet développement et éducation (formation) du gouvernement béninois 6. Utiliser les compétences recensées pour participer à la formation des formateurs au Bénin. Appellation & Couverture Géographique Couverture Géographique de la Structure Nom du Responsable Suprême Etat (Unité Cellulaire) Responsable Suprême d’Etat ou Unité Cellulaire Zone (ensemble d’Etats) Coordonnateur de Zone Région (Ensemble de Zones) Délégué Général du BEF, ou Vice-Président de Région Etats-Unis d’Amérique Président du Bureau Exécutif Fédéral Pour éviter une lourdeur administrative qui empêcherait la bonne marche des activités, il est indispensable que ce qui suit soit appliqué : A. Le Bureau Exécutif d’Etat est composé de: 1. Responsable Suprême d’Etat (titre Président) 2. Secrétaire d’Etat 3. Trésorier (re) d’Etat (un compte Bancaire pour l’Etat doit être ouvert) 4. Secrétaire Chargé(e) des Enfants (Education-Anniversaires/Noël/Jour Indépendance –Langue Française) 5. Secrétaire Chargé(e) des Affaires Culturelles et Sportives (Sport – Artistes – Arts – Cinéma – Photographie) 6. Secrétaire chargée des Affaires économiques (Partenariat- Fusionnement-Concentration-Déconcentration institutions économiques) 7. Secrétaire à l’organisation (planificateur des évènements) 8. Secrétaire de Zone & Agent-Liaison d’Etats (participe aux réunions d’Etat dans le cadre de son emploi en tant qu’Agent-Liaison d’Etats mais n’a pas droit de vote). B. Le Bureau Exécutif de Zone est composé de: 1. Coordonnateur de la Zone. Il est élu parmi les Responsables Suprêmes d’Etat dans une assemblée de Zone ou par consensus sans assemblée générale au début. 2. Secrétaire de Zone & Agent-Liaison d’Etats: C’est une position de multitâches travaillant aussi bien avec le Coordonnateur de Zone que les autres membres du Bureau Exécutif d’Etat pour remplir correctement sa mission. En tant qu’Agent-Liaison d’Etats, il/elle doit s’imprégner des actions qui se mènent au-niveau des autres Etats de la Zone pour en faire un compte-rendu régulier au Coordonnateur de Zone (lorsque le tour de ce poste arrive dans son Etat) et/ou bien au Responsable Suprême d’Etat, lorsqu’il n’est pas Coordonnateur de Zone. Ce rôle tampon est important pour la cohésion de la Zone. Un compte Bancaire pour la Zone doit être ouvert. Le Secrétaire de Zone & Agent-Liaison d Zone est élu au suffrage de la Zone ou désigné par le Coordonnateur de la Zone. C. Le Bureau Exécutif de la Région est composé de: 1. Le Délégué General de Région ou le Vice-Président du BEF : il est élu parmi les Coordonnateurs de Zone pour une durée compatible avec la durée du Président du BEF dans une assemblée des Coordonnateurs de Zones dans une région spécifique. Pendant son mandat de Délégué Général de Région ou Vice-Président, il peut cumuler les fonctions ordinaires de Coordonnateur de sa Zone et de Délégué General de Région ou Vice-Président. Deux Secrétaires sont directement sous ses ordres : 1) Secrétaire de Zone & Agent-Liaison d’Etats ; 2) Secrétaire de Région ou Coordonnateur de la Région 2. Secrétaire de Région ou Agent-Liaison Régions. C’est une position de multitâches travaillant aussi bien avec le Délégué General de Région (ou Vice-Président qui est son patron direct) qu’avec les quatre Coordonnateurs des Zones de la Région pour remplir correctement sa mission. En tant qu’Agent-Liaison Régions, il/elle doit s’imprégner des actions qui se mènent au-niveau des autres régions pour en faire un compte-rendu régulier au Délégué Général de Région ou Vice-Président. Ce rôle tampon est important pour la cohésion de la Région. (un compte Bancaire pour la Région doit être ouvert) D. Le Bureau Exécutif Fédéral de Benin Diaspora USA Le Bureau Exécutif Fédéral est composé de Cinq (5) membres: · Un Président (e) · 3 Vice-Présidents (es) · Commissaire Fédéral aux Comptes Les quatre vice-présidents de Région formeront les postes de Président et 3 Vice-présidents du Bureau Exécutif Fédéral. Sur une base rotative, les Vice-Présidents accèderont au Poste de Président du BEF sur un calendrier de 2 à 3 ans (à déterminer à la conférence). Le Commissaire Fédéral aux Comptes est directement élu en salle selon les qualifications professionnelles. Le Bureau Exécutif Fédéral est doté d’un Secrétariat Administratif Permanent. Le dernier Président sortant est membre à titre consultatif sans droit de vote. Voici les objectives à remplir par le BEF 1. Créer un site officiel de Web Site à utiliser pour la création des institutions de base qui sont les associations des Béninois au niveau de chaque Etat 2. Animer et travailler avec tous les responsables à tous les niveaux Etats/Zones/Régions pour permettre une meilleure gestion des ressources de la Diaspora Béninoise des Etats-Unis d’Amérique 3. Travailler de concert avec les représentations diplomatiques pour s’imprégner des priorités du Benin 4. Servir de centre de ressources pour les possibilités d'investissement au Bénin 5. Servir de centre de ressources humaines et d'accumulation des compétences à enrichir par des études et des recherches. 6. Servir de plateforme pour l'organisation des conférences de réflexion 7. Initier des actions pour supporter une législation pour les intérêts du Bénin et de l'Afrique en général 8. Supporter la vision économique et le volet développement et éducation (formation) du gouvernement béninois 9. Utiliser les compétences recensées pour participer à la formation des formateurs au Bénin. On aura : 1) Président : Chef des Etats-Unis d’Amérique, Président du Bureau Exécutif Fédéral Charge des relations entre la Diaspora Américaine et les Institutions Nationales (USA gouvernement – Ambassades & Consulats Benin aux USA) et les Institutions Internationales (Diaspora Internationale & gouvernements Benin et étrangers) 2) Premier Vice-Président, Chargé des projets économiques de la Diaspora 3) Deuxième Vice-Président Chargé des rapports entre le BEF et les Régions 4) Troisième Vice-Président Chargé des affaires juridiques et Sociales (Immigration – Conflit interpersonnel & intra personnel) 5) Commissaire Fédéral aux Comptes: Pour vérifier tous les comptes à tous les niveaux. Il participe aux réunions du BEF en tant membre entier et ayant droit au vote. Il est directement élu à la conférence selon les qualifications professionnelles. 6) Secrétaire General du BEF. Le Bureau Exécutif Fédéral est doté d’un Secrétariat Administratif Permanent. Ce poste purement professionnel sera payant basé dans la ville capitale de Benin Diaspora USA (probablement à la capitale des Etats-Unis d’Amérique à Washington DC). Pour le moment, il est n’est pas nécessaire de pourvoir le poste puisque nous n’avons pas les moyens pour payer un SG du BEF. On doit se donner plus de temps pour construire et appliquer la structure générale de Benin Diaspora USA afin que tout le monde comprenne l’importance de ce regroupement structurel qui doit inclure la participation effective de nos enfants. Pendant cette période transitoire, chaque membre du BEF (Président & Vice-Présidents continueront à utiliser leur staff pour travailler dans le cadre du BEF). 7) Ancien Président, membre du BEF à titre consultatif mais sans droit de vote. Le Président en exercice peut lui confier des tâches précises à réaliser. L’ancien président peut accepter ou refuser. II. Pratique des Elections de la Deuxième Conférence Economique Indianapolis La Conférence va commencer avec les interventions du représentant du Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine, de la Francophonie, et des Béninois de l’Extérieur, de nos Ambassadeurs représentant le Benin aux USA, de l’Attache Militaire de la Défense à l’Ambassade du Benin à Washington, des autorités politico-administratives de l’Etat d’Indiana, du Représentant du Haut Conseil des Béninois en Amérique et Caraïbes, des représentations des Associations des Béninois aux Etats-Unis. Après le compte rendu des membres du BEF sortant, le Président du Comité Préparatoire Local va faciliter le choix des membres du Présidium pour les élections des membres du Bureau Exécutif Fédéral parmi les participants. Le Présidium est formé du Président du Présidium, Secrétaire & Rapporteur. Comme à l’accoutumée, seuls les représentants en salle votent selon leur état d’origine. Les participants vont se retrouver selon leur région pour élire un délégué Général de Région. Les délégués généraux vont se retrouver pour désigner le Président du BEF, Premier VP, Deuxième VP, Troisième VP. Le Commissaire Fédéral aux Comptes est directement élu dans la salle selon les compétences professionnelles pour vérifier tous les comptes à tous les niveaux des Etats-Unis d’Amérique. A cet effet, un profil de qualifications sera présenté dans la salle de conférence. Le Présidium rédigera le PV des élections qu’il lira à l’assemblée générale à la fin des votes. Les nouveaux élus pour conduire les destinées de Benin Diaspora USA seront présentés à tous les participants. Fin de Conférence. Pour La Commission de l’Administration & Redynamisation Benin Diaspora USA Pierre Jacques Atchade Dr. Pierre Atchade, Coordonnateur Commission 1 Administration & Redynamisation Président du Comité Préparatoire Local Vice-Président Bureau Exécutif Fédéral Sortant Benin Diaspora USA Septembre 5, 2012

Association des Beninois des Etats-Unis d'Amerique - A.B.U.S.A.

Association des Beninois des Etats-Unis d'Amerique, ABUSA Association des Beninois des Etats-Unis d'Amerique - A.B.U.S.A. Vision du Benin Diaspora USA, Inc. Béninois & Béninoises des Etats-Unis d’Amérique s’engagent à travailler en union pour améliorer leur vie, éduquer leurs enfants, et participer au développement économique de la République du Benin. Mission Benin Diaspora USA, Inc. est une institution à caractère social, cultural, économique et apolitique qui s’engage à unir tous les Béninois et Béninoises des Etats-Unis d’Amérique pour travailler ensemble afin d’améliorer leur vie, aider leurs enfants, et participer au développement économique de la République du Benin. Buts Pour atteindre la mission afin de réaliser sa vision, Benin Diaspora USA, Inc. s’est fixé comme objectifs : Rédiger les Statuts de Constitution sous forme d’un non profit organisation reconnue comme 501c3 selon les réglementations légales des Etats-Unis d’Amérique Créer un site officiel de Web Site à utiliser pour la création des institutions de base qui sont les associations des Béninois au niveau de chaque Etat Regrouper les Etats sous forme de Régions pour permettre une meilleure gestion des ressources de la Diaspora Béninoise des Etats-Unis d’Amérique A travers ses institutions ainsi formées Benin Diaspora USA, Inc. aura pour fonctions de : Travailler de concert avec les représentations diplomatiques pour s’imprégner des priorités du Benin Servir de centre de ressources pour les possibilités d'investissement au Bénin Servir de centre de ressources humaines et d'accumulation des compétences à enrichir par des études et des recherches. Servir de plateforme pour l'organisation des conférences de réflexion Initier des actions pour supporter une législation pour les intérêts du Bénin et de l'Afrique en général Supporter la vision économique et le volet développement et éducation (formation) du gouvernement béninois Utiliser les compétences recensées pour participer à la formation des formateurs au Bénin. Benin Diaspora USA. Inc. n’a pas été créé par surprise. Il y a eu un processus qui a été entamé bien avant l’organisation de la conférence et certains regroupements des Béninois aux Etats Unis devraient être reconnus. Regroupements avant la Conférence Economique de New York. Bien avant la rencontre historique des 8 & 9 décembre 2007, des entités des Béninois qui travaillaient tantôt à caractère national, tantôt à caractère régional, ou tantôt à caractère local ont été les précurseurs du Benin Diaspora USA, Inc. aux Etats Unis d’Amérique. Il s’agit de ABUSA, Haut Conseil des Béninois de l’Extérieur Section des Amérique & Caraïbes (HCBE), Association des Béninois de New England, Alliance de New York New Jersey & Connecticut, et des associations étatiques (tels que Association des Béninois à Indiana (ABI), Association des Béninois à Illinois, les représentants des Etats de Pennsylvanie, Texas, Californie, Nebraska, Caroline du Nord, etc.) Formation du Comité Préparatoire de la Conférence de New York Une avancée terrible vers la création d’une institution regroupant tous les Béninois n’a été réellement amorcée qu’à partir du 11 décembre 2006, juste après la visite officielle du Président Yayi Boni à Washington DC. L’initiative de se regrouper dans une institution englobant tous les Béninois aux Etats-Unis d’Amérique a été l’œuvre de certains Béninois qui a priori ne se sont pas réclamés représentant une organisation. Une déclaration du 28 janvier 2007 de la communauté béninoise des USA en faveur d’une solidarité d’action a été adoptée. Il a été clairement défini dans l’article 1 et l’article 2 des principes qui demandent une coordination des actions et des représentations étatiques. Ensuite un Comité Préparatoire sera créé à une réunion devant se tenir à l’enceinte de notre Représentation Diplomatique à Washington pour donner un caractère officiel à nos décisions. Effectivement, la réunion s’était tenue le 26 mai 2007 en présence de Mr. Cyrille Oguin, Ambassadeur de la République du Benin près des Etats-Unis d’Amérique pour former le Comité Préparatoire de la Conférence de la Diaspora Béninoise aux USA. Cliquer ici pour lire le compte rendu de réunion désignant les membres du comité préparatoire de la conférence de New York. Rapport de la Conférence Economique des 8 & 9 décembre 2007 à New York. Les 8 et 9 décembre 2007, les Béninois étaient venus nombreux des quatre coins des Etats-Unis d’Amérique pour assister à leur première Conférence Economique dont le thème était « Contribution des Béninois des Etats-Unis d’Amérique pour le développement socio-économique, culturel et éducatif du Benin. ». La rencontre a eu lieu à New York, dans la somptueuse salle de Conférence de l’impressionnant bâtiment d’Adam Clayton Powell Jr., situé en plein cœur d’Harlem et à quelques mètres des bureaux du Président Bill Clinton. L’arrivée du Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, chargé des Béninois de l’extérieur était attendue, mais pour des raisons indépendantes de sa volonté il n’a pu honorer cette Conférence de sa présence. L’honneur est donc revenu à leurs Excellences M. Cyrille S. Oguin et M. Jean Marie Ehouzou respectivement Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire du Bénin près les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire, Représentant Permanent du Bénin auprès des Nations Unies, de patronner la dite Conférence. Dans leurs allocutions d’ouverture nos deux Ambassadeurs ont rappelé aux participants leur rôle très important dans le processus de développement économique d’un Benin émergent, et l’espoir que le peuple béninois tout entier place en eux. Afin d’assurer le succès dans leurs travaux, ils ont tour à tour exhorté tous les participant à faire preuve de courtoisie et de solidarité les uns envers les autres, d’amour mutuel et d’entraide, et enfin, à se tolérer les uns les autres. « C’est l’égoïsme poussé qui fait que nous nous battons, que nous nous pilonnons et que nous nous écrasons telles les miettes de gombo séché dans le mortier. Tolérance et Pardon doivent être notre credo, alors acceptons le droit à la différence !» a déclaré l’Ambassadeur Jean-Marie Ehouzou avant de passer la parole à son Excellence l’Ambassadeur Cyrille S. Oguin qui a ensuite déclaré ouvert les travaux de la Conférence. Il convient ici de mentionner que des investisseurs étrangers et des responsables d’autres diasporas assistaient nombreux aux travaux de la Conférence. Il faut aussi saluer tous les membres du Comité Préparatoire pour l’organisation parfaite de cette première Conférence Economique de la Diaspora des USA. Après l’adoption de l’ordre du jour proposé par le Comité préparatoire suivie des séances de prière, la plénière a laissé place aux travaux en panels. Les conférenciers se sont répartis dans les huit (08) panels de discussion thématique afin d’échanger et de faire des recommandations sur les projets à court et moyens termes contenus dans le rapport de la Commission Socio-économique du Comité Préparatoire. Après le goûter, aux environs de 18 heures, Dr. Pierre Atchade, Président de la Commission Politique du Comité Préparatoire a commencé la présentation des travaux de sa commission. La présentation du rapport de cette Commission n’a pas manqué de donner lieu à un débat très vif au sein des conférenciers dans la mesure où, le modèle de structure d’exécution à caractère fédéral proposé n’avait pas rallié le consensus. Certains participants ont proposé en lieu et place du Bureau fédéral de la diaspora des Béninois aux Etats-Unis d’Amérique un Comité de suivi qui n’aura pour mission que de suivre la mise en œuvre des recommandations faites par la Conférence. Pour un autre groupe de conférenciers, la référence faite au mot politique suscitait des inquiétudes en ce sens qu’il pourrait ouvrir les voies pour une instrumentalisation de la diaspora par ceux qui seraient portés à la tète des structures à mettre en place. Il aura fallu recourir à des séances de prière pour ramener le calme dans la salle et poursuivre les travaux dans la sérénité. Les différentes questions ont été mises aux votes. Les résultats de votes ont permis de retenir le principe de la mise en place d’un Bureau Fédéral (organe exécutif) qui se chargera de l’organisation et de la gestion politique de la Diaspora Béninoise des USA. Ainsi, la Conférence a souverainement adopté les travaux de la Commission Politique du Comité Préparatoire après des modifications qui seront incluses dans son rapport final qui sera publié dans les prochains jours.

Association des Beninois du Rhones-Alpes - ABRA (France)

Association des Beninois du Rhones-Alpe, ABRA, diaspora France Association des Beninois du Rhones-Alpes - ABRA (France) Articles sans catégorie Remerciements :ARBRE E NOËL 2010 ARBRE DE NOËL 2010 MERCI ET JOYEUX NOËL A TOUS ABRA /ARBRE DE NOËL SOLIDAIRE 2010 Cérémonie au cimetière de la doua à villeurbanne le 30/10/2010 Rencontre des Béninois et Mr Dakpè SOSSOU , Maire de Lokossa le 28 octobre 2010 à LYON le maire de lokossa Dakpè SOSSOU Rencontre des béninois avec le maire de lokossa à lyon Commémoration du 11 novembre 2010 au Tata Africain de Chasselay Possibilité du recensement en ligne Rencontre avec les étudiants ,stagiaires et Jeunes béninnois le 10 octobre 2010à BRON Invitation étudiants ,stagiaires et jeunes Béninois FERMETURE DU CONSULAT DU BENIN A LYON DU 7 AU 14 NOVEMBRE 2010 FERMETURE DU CONSULAT DU BENIN A LYON DU 07 AU 14 NOVEMBRE 2010 Décès de Georges GOVOU le 21/09/10 ( pére de GOVOU Sidney) Messe en memoire de Vincent GONGO le 03 octobre 2010 Recensement des Béninois de France dans le cadre de la liste Electorale Permanente Informatisée ( LEPI) iNFOMATION AFRICA'50 Demande d'aide pour une Béninoise MERCI A TOUTES ET A TOUS INFORMATION DU CONSULAT GENERAL DU 06 /09/2010 info consulat général DE LYON LESCOMPAGNIES ARERIENNES DESSERVANT LE BENIN Invitation de la fête de l'indépendance à Lyon (FRANCE) Nouvelle chaine de télévision Béninoise Monsieur ZOUNON Wassi , Président de l'ABRA à la cérémonie du 14 juillet 2010 à PARIS Message du consul général /Renouvellement des cartes d'identité consulaires carte d'invitation fête fe m'indépendance du Bénin à Lyon Fête de l'indépendance du Bénin à Lyon Le Président de l'ABRA invité aux manifestations du 14 juillet 2010 à Paris Rémaniement ministériel au Bénin Le "Tata" sénégalais de Chasselay dans le Rhône (film de Patrice ADRESSE DE L'ABRA INFORMATION DU CONSULAT GENERAL LE 10 JUIN 2010 NOTE D'INFORMATION DU CONSULAT GENERAL DU BENIN A PARIS AG ,REUNIONS, RENCONTRES , ACTIVITES ET EVENEMENTS DEPUIS LE DIMANCHE 22 NOVEMBRE 2009 NOUVEAUX ARRIVANTS DANS LA REGION LES MEMBRES DU CONSEIL CONSULTATIF Visitez le site du Cinquantenaire des Indépendances Africaines à Lyon : LYON AUX COULEURS DU MONDE Fêtes consulaires 5 et 6juin 2010 La fête bannièredu monde à Lyon le SAMEDI 5 JUIN 2010 REMERCIEMENTS ET MESSE POUR LE DECES DE LUCIEN AKPOLOU REMERCIEMENTS ET MESSE POUR AKPOLOU LUCIEN HOMMAGE A Mr Donatien AZANDO Remerciements de la famille ITCHAOU Compte rendu de la 4è réuinon du HCBE France le 3 Avril 2010 Assemblée générale extraordinaire le dimanche 21 mars 2010 au CCO.JPL à Villeurbanne LE 08 MARS : LA JOURNEE DE LA FEMME RENCONTRES REUNIONS DE BUREAU En Rhône-Alpes différents représentants des associations des communautés africaines de Lyon et sa région s'organisent pour la célébration du 50ème anniversaire de l'indépendance des pays africains Lettre d'information de Mr LAWSON aux membres de la communauté Béninoise ABRA Lettre d'information de Mr LAWSON aux membres de la communauté Béninoise ABRA COOPERATION DECENTRALISEE : LA CAPITALE DE BENIN ( PORTO-NOVO ) BIENTOT A LYON ABRA -CONVENTIONS LES VINGT ANS D'ABRA ABRA /NOUVEAUX ARRIVANTS ABRA /ST SYLVESTRE ABRA / MESSE DE SOUVENIR 2010 ASSEMBLEE GENERALE ORDINAIRE Rapport de la commission LAWSON-C.ADJAHI -AIDAZAN DE 2001 ABRA CONFERENCE-DEBAT SUR LE SIDA LE 5 JUILLET 2008 A LA MAIRIE DU 8ème ARRONDISSEMENT DE LYON ABRA CONFERENCE-DEBAT SUR LE SIDA LE 5 JUILLET 2008 A LA GRANDE SALLE DE LA MAIRIE DU 8ème ARRONDISSEMENT DE LYON DE 16H A 19H ABRA CONFERENCE SUR LE SIDA LE 5 JUILLET 2008 A LA MAIRIE LYON 8ème ABRA PARTENAIRES 1989-2009 BIENTOT XXème ANNIVERSAIRE DE L'ABRA AGENDA DU PRESIDENT REUNIONS DU BUREAU D'ABRA ABRA DANS LE MONDE ASSOCIATIF HISTORIQUE DE L'ASSOCIATION DES BENINOIS DE RHONE-ALPES histoire de tata sénégalais de chasseley invitation de la journée de commémoration du 11 novembre 2007 à Chasselay histoire du benin Proposition du nouveau contrat politique économique et culturelle LE REGLEMENT INTERIEUR D'ABRA courrier au consul LES STATUTS DE L'ASSOCIATION MESSE EN MEMOIRE DU CARDINAL BERNARDIN GANTIN LE VENDREDI 16 MAI MESSE EN MEMOIRE DU CARDINAL BERNARDIN GANTIN LE VENDREDI 16 MAI ACTIONS DEPUIS LE 10 JUIN 2007 LES ANCIENS PRESIDENTS Procès verbal de l'assemblée générale ordinaire du 10 juin 2007 JOURNAL OFFICIEL DES ASSOCIATIONS

Association des Beninois du Texas pour le Developpement (MBTD)

Association des Beninois du Texas pour le Developpement, MBTD Association des Beninois du Texas pour le Developpement (MBTD) Mouvement Des Beninois Du Texas Pour Le Developpement - Benin Alliance for Development filed as a Domestic Nonprofit Corporation in the State of Texas on Monday, February 13, 2012 and is approximately three years old, according to public records filed with Texas Secretary of State. See http://www.corporationwiki.com/Texas/Dallas/mouvement-des-beninois-du-texas-pour-le-developpement-benin/101326134.aspx

Association des Ressortissants Béninois en France

Association des Ressortissants Béninois en France, ARBF Association des Ressortissants Béninois en France Présentation & objectifs « Mobilisons-nous ensemble pour le rayonnement et le développement de l’ARBF » image1 L’ARBF, a été créée en 1994 dans la région du Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Elle accueille et accompagne la communauté Béninoise en France sans exclusivité, en commençant par ceux résidant dans la région Nord-Pas-de-Calais, dans les démarches d’insertion, des échanges d’expériences, la mise en réseau et aide à la structuration. À l’international L’ARBF peut accompagner le renforcement des capacités de la société civile, à la défense des droits de l’homme, au développement économique, à l’intervention d’urgence et à la lutte contre la pauvreté image2 L’ARBF a pour objet de : Regrouper tous les ressortissants Béninois, quel que soit leur statut socioprofessionnel. Défendre les intérêts matériels et moraux de ses membres. Resserrer les liens de fraternités, de solidarité et d’amitié entre ses membres. Promouvoir et de développer des rapports socioculturels par l’organisation de rencontres, de débats, de soirées et d’expositions de toutes natures, permettant de mieux apprécier les réalités Béninoises et Africaines. Instaurer et de développer des relations avec toutes les autres associations ou organisations œuvrant dans le même sens.

Association des Ressortissants Beninois de l'Universite de Sherbrooke (ARBUS)

Association des Ressortissants Beninois de l'Universite de Sherbrooke, ARBUS Association des Ressortissants Beninois de l'Universite de Sherbrooke (ARBUS) Association des ressortissants béninois de Unniversite de sherbrooke is ...

Association des Ressortissants Beninois en Belgique (ARBB)

Association des Ressortissants Beninois en Belgique, ARBB Association des Ressortissants Beninois en Belgique (ARBB) L’ARBB est une association de Béninois de droit belge. Elle souhaite offrir un cadre social visant à l’épanouissement de ses membres, ainsi qu'un cadre socio-économique de réflexion, d’action et de promotion pour le développement du Bénin. C’est une association indépendante, autonome et apolitique de durée de vie illimitée. La communauté est ouverte à tout Béninois résidant en Belgique quelque soit son sexe, son activité, ses convictions politiques, philosophiques et religieuses. Enfin , les principes régissant l’association sont : la libre adhésion, l’égalité de ses membres et le respect mutuel.

ASSOCIATION DES RESSORTISSANTS ET SYMPATISANTS DU BENIN AU NEW-ENGLAND (USA)

ASSOCIATION DES RESSORTISSANTS ET SYMPATISANTS DU BENIN AU NEW-ENGLAND (USA) ASSOCIATION DES RESSORTISSANTS ET SYMPATISANTS DU BENIN AU NEW-ENGLAND (USA) ASSOCIATION DES RESSORTISSANTS ET SYMPATISANTS DU BENIN AU NEW-ENGLAND (USA) is ... https://www.facebook.com/people/Arsb-newengland-Arsb/100002198088647

Association des Senegalais d'Amerique

Association des Senegalais d'Amerique, ASA, diaspora Senegalaise Association des Senegalais d'Amerique Chers membres et sympathisants, C’est avec un grand plaisir que je vous souhaite un cordial bienvenu à ce site web de l’Association des Sénégalais d’ Amérique ! Depuis plus de vingt-cinq que notre association existe, elle s’est attelée à regrouper la communauté sénégalaise aux Etats-Unis, à travailler au renforcement de la solidarité entre membres, et surtout à l’encadrement et à la protection du membre ou qu’il puisse être. Aujourd’hui, nous travaillons ardemment à l’intégration des enfants d’émigrés nés ici aux Etats-Unis et à la jeune génération. Ce site web doit être pour nous tous un outil interactif d’information et de communication, d’échange et d'entraide mutuelle. Nous espérons que les informations que vous y trouverez-vous seront utiles, et restons attentifs à vos suggestions et recommandations.

Association des Senegalais d'Amerique

Association des Senegalais d'Amerique Association des Senegalais d'Amerique Historique Créée en 1988 sous le nom de l’ Association Nationale des Sénégalais d’ Amérique (ANSA) et plus tard de l’Association des Sénégalais d’ Amérique (ASA) par l’ Assemblée Générale ordinaire de Janvier 1994, l’ ASA s’était fixée dés le début de sa création de rassembler tous les sénégalais qui résident aux Etats-Unis sans distinction de leurs convictions religieuses, politiques et philosophiques. Son bureau est composé de bonnes volontés acquises à la nécessité d’organiser leur communauté. L’ASA est la plus grande association d’immigrés/émigrés africains francophones et/ou l’une des plus grandes dans l’immigration africaine. Elle a joué un rôle capital dans la création du Consulat général à New York City. Depuis sa naissance l’ASA s’est toujours évertuée à l’amélioration des conditions d’existence des immigrés/émigrés sénégalais et africains. Malgré la croissance exponentielle de la communauté sénégalaise ces dernières années avec son corollaire de problèmes sociaux ( violence domestique, problèmes de ménage, éducation des enfants, acculturation, dislocation de familles, drogues, divorce, arrestations et assassinats, rapatriements de personnes ou des corps de défunts) l’ASA n’a pas manqué à sa mission d’assistance, de protection et de défense des sénégalais des Etats-Unis. Le Reglement CHAPITRE I DENOMINATION – OBJET SOCIAL – SIEGE - DUREE PART. 1 - Il est constitué une Association des Sénégalais d’Amérique résidant aux Etats-Unis dénommée “Association des Sénégalais d’Amérique abrégé A.S.A.” PART. 2 - L’objet de l’association est : - d’étudier les problèmes des Sénégalais des Etats-Unis ; - d’aider á la création de leur regroupement sans distinction de leurs convictions religieuses, politiques et philosophiques ; - de défendre leurs valeurs socio-culturelles et traditionnelles ; - de prendre une part active au développement économique de leur communauté. Cet objet pourra être réalisé notamment : 1/ par l’organisation de réunion, d’activités culturelles et sportives au sein de l’association ou en collaboration avec d’autres associations ou institutions. 2/ par des publications. PART. 3 - L’Association des Sénégalais d’Amérique s’interdit toute activité et toute discussion à caractère politique, religieux et philosophique. Sera considéré comme activité de propagande ou de discussion politique, religieuse et philosophique, tout rassemblement visant á utiliser l’association á des fins partisanes ou á mettre en cause le caractère neutre et apolitique de l’A.S.A. PART. 4 – La durée de vie de l’association est illimitée. PART. 5 – L’association a son siege au 121 St Nicholas Avenue # 5, New York, NY 10026 – TEL (212) 932-0900. Les activités de l’association peuvent s’exercer partout dans le monde. La réunion des organes de l’association peut avoir lieu soit au siège, soit à tout autre endroit. CHAPITRE II MEMBRES – COTISATIONS – DEMISSION – EXCLUSION PART. 6 - L’Association est composée de membres d’honneur et de membres individuels. PART. 7 - Le comité directeur, sur proposition du bureau peut décerner la qualité de membre d’honneur à des personnes physiques ou morales qui, par leurs activités ou leurs contributions ont montré qu’elles sont favorables aux principes et aux buts de l’ASA. Elles peuvent être de nationalité sénégalaise ou autre et titulaire d’une carte de membre d’honneur. Le titre de membre d’honneur appelle une participation annuelle laissée à la discrétion de l’intéressé. PART. 8 - Le nombre de membres individuels est illimité. Peuvent devenir membres individuels de l’ASA, les personnes physiques qui remplissent les conditions suivantes et qui en font la demande : - être de nationalité sénégalaise ; - vivre aux USA ; - s’engager à respecter les statuts et le règlement intérieur de l’ASA ; - s’engager à s’acquitter de ses cotisations pour l’année en cours ; PART. 9 - Le droit d’adhésion des membres individuels est fixé à vingt dollars ($ 20) et la cotisation mensuelle à $ 10. PART. 10 - Les ressources de l’association proviennent : 1/ des droits d’adhésion et des cotisations de ses membres individuels ou d’honneur ; 2/ des dons et des subventions des collectivités publiques ou privées ; 3/ des produits de ses activités économiques, culturelles et sportives et enfin des intérêts générés par ses avoirs. PART. 11 - L’association n’a l’obligation d’assister que les membres à jour de leur cotisation. Les membres dont le retard des cotisations ne dépassant pas trois mois sont éligibles à cette assistance. PART. 12 - La qualité de membre individuel se perd par démission ou exclusion. Tout membre est libre de se retirer de l’association en adressant sa démission au président. La démission est définitive dans les trente (30) jours suivant la réception. Les droits sociaux des membres n’ayant pas payé leurs cotisations à la fin de l’année sont suspendus jusqu’au règlement de leurs arriérés. Est considéré démissionnaire le membre qui, n’ayant pas payé ses cotisations à la fin de l’exercice, reste en défaut de s’exécuter dans les trois mois suivant une mise en demeure par lettre recommandée. Tout membre peut assister aux réunions du comité directeur sans droit de parole et de vote. Tout membre qui n’est pas à jour de ses cotisations peut assister à l’A.G. mais il ne peut ni prendre la parole ni voter. Tout membre qui doit postuler à un poste au comite directeur ou au bureau doit être membre de l’association pendant au mois un (1) an et à jour de ses cotisations. CHAPITRE III ASSEMBLEE GENERALE PART. 13 - L’Assemblée Générale Ordinaire se réunit au moins tous les deux ans, à la date et au lieu fixés par le bureau. Le délai entre les deux Assemblées Générales Ordinaires ne saurait dépasser vingt quatre (24) mois. LE BUREAU ORGANISE CHAQUE ANNEE UNE ASSEMBLEE GENERALE D’INFORMATION AU COURS DE LAQUELLE, IL SOUMET LES COMPTES DE L’EXERCICE ECOULE ET LES ACTIVITES POUR L’ANNEE SUIVANTE. Le président expose la situation morale de l’Association. Ne peuvent faire l’objet de vote lors de l’Assemblée Générale que les questions qui sont à l’ordre du jour. 27 membres individuels de l’Associati