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About Stanford African Students Association (SASA)

Stanford African Students Association, SASA Stanford African Students Association (SASA) We are a student organization committed to promoting awareness about the African continent, and fostering cultural and social ties with people of African descent and those interested in Africa in and around the Stanford community. ​ ​Mission ​ SASA is committed to fostering cultural, political, and social awareness about the African continent, promoting dialogue about pertinent issues affecting the continent, creating an intellectual and social space for Africans at Stanford, and fostering fellowship between SASA and members of the Stanford and Bay Area community at large. ​ ​General Information ​ From the onset of our organization's founding in 1979, which is reflected by our acronym "SASA" (which means "now" in Swahili), SASA seeks to convey the urgency and importance of not only African issues, but also the African presence throughout the world. The Birth of SASA ​​ During the mid and late l970s, however, things changed—the Stanford African student population had progressively increased over the years. African students realized that an informal organization could no longer take care of their concerns. ​ On December 4, 1978, at a meeting of African students, an interim organizing committee was appointed to draft a constitution and prepare an agenda for the first formal meeting of a new African Students Association. ​ On January 7, 1979, the first meeting was held and the draft constitution was approved. The Stanford African Students Association (SASA) came to being. The acronym ‘SASA” was carefully selected for in Swahili it means “Now.” It clearly expressed the dominant feeling among African students of the urgency with which the problems facing Africa had to be confronted. In blessing the birth of the newly born child, it was agreed that SASA’s aims and objectives be: ​​ (1) To foster unity among members and to promote social, political and cultural awareness of Africans at Stanford,​ (2) To provide a forum for the discussion of issues pertaining to Africa.​ (3) To promote understanding between Africans and Americans.​ (4) To promote solidarity of Africans with Third World students.​ (5) To foster cultural and social ties with all peoples of African descent within the Stanford community.
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