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About Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain (AUGB)

Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain, AUGB Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain (AUGB) The Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain (AUGB) is the largest representative body for Ukrainians and those of Ukrainian descent in the UK. It exists to develop, promote and support the interests of the Ukrainian community in the UK. The Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain (AUGB) is the largest representative body for Ukrainians and those of Ukrainian descent. It exists to develop, promote and support the interests of the Ukrainian community in the UK. Registered Office: 49 Linden Gardens, London W2 4HG. Tel. 020 72298392. The Association was founded in 1946 by Ukrainians who came to Great Britain at the end of the Second World War. AUGB operates a network of 28 local branches, with their own social/cultural centre, across the UK. There are also 19 smaller branches and sub-branches which do not have their own centre, but organise periodic events for Ukrainians in their area. At local level, we support Ukrainian Community Schools, Day Centres and a range of cultural and social activities. We have a highly respected reference library and archive in London, a small gift shop, and we publish, fortnightly, the only bilingual Ukrainian-English newspaper in the UK, ‘Ukrayinska Dumka’. AUGB works closely with other community organisations, including the Association of Ukrainian Women, the Association of Ukrainian Teachers and Educators, youth organisations and others. We have a working relationship with the Embassy of Ukraine in the United Kingdom. Internationally, AUGB is a member of the Ukrainian World Congress (CKY) and its European counterpart (EKY), and works with various organisations in Ukraine, including government and academic institutions. AUGB organises campaigns and events to promote and commemorate aspects of Ukrainian history and culture. The 2008 campaign was dedicated to the 75th anniversary of the Holodomor, the artificial famine in Ukraine in 1932-33 in which 7 million Ukrainians, including a third of Ukraine’s children, died from enforced starvation. Previous campaigns have included the 20th anniversary of the Chornobyl disaster, which was accompanied by an exhibition of original photographs and documents in conjunction with the National Museum of the History of Ukraine and a National commemoration celebrating the bicentenary of the birth of Ukraine's bard, Taras Shevchenko.
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