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About Rights and Accountability in Development Limited (RAID)

Rights and Accountability in Development Limited, RAID Rights and Accountability in Development Limited (RAID) RAID is a non-profit making organisation based in Oxford that works to hold companies to account for illegal and unethical practices by helping victims to obtain redress, and by campaigning for stronger domestic and international mechanisms of regulation for business. RAID advocates for binding corporate accountability frameworks, particularly the development of international norms on the human rights responsibilities of companies. RAID's first piece of research, in 1997, examined the human rights impacts of the privatisation of Zambia's state-owned copper mines. As a result of its investigations, RAID was the first NGO to file a complaint under the revised OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, concerning the conduct of Anglo-American. RAID's work with Zambian NGOs provided a model that has been much emulated by other NGOs. RAID's work is painstaking and longterm. A current case is the ongoing struggle for justice in the Anvil case, where the Congolese military made use of Anvil Mining Limited's personnel and equipment to crush an insurgency in the town of Kilwa, Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2004. RAID's work has been made possible by the generous financial support of the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, the Sigrid Rausing Trust and the European Commission. RAID promotes respect for human rights and responsible conduct by companies abroad. RAID works to ensure that companies that perpetrate human rights abuses, cause environmental harm or engage in corruption or financial impropriety are held to account. Working closely with affected communities, RAID seeks redress through complaints mechanisms and legal actions throughout the world, as well as advising governments, companies and international institutions on good practice.
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